How to correct opioid misinformation? Spend $285M on counter-marketing, expert says in J&J trial

fiercepharma | June 11, 2019

How to correct opioid misinformation? Spend $285M on counter-marketing, expert says in J&J trial
Countless lawsuits have sought to estimate the costs of fixing the U.S. opioid and addiction epidemic. Now, thanks to an expert in Oklahoma's ongoing trial against Johnson & Johnson, we have one dollar figure. Oklahoma would have to spend nearly $285 million to mount a counter-marketing campaign that would offset pharma’s influence over pain prescribing, Saxum Strategic Communications chairman and CEO Renzi Stone testified during the state’s trial against Johnson & Johnson on Monday. And that's just the cost of a campaign to spread awareness about the harms of opioids, Stone pointed out in testimony reported by the Oklahoman. It doesn't include the other costs of fixing the state's opioid crisis.

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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Daniel Kraft shows us where technology can take us in health and medicine. He pulls out countless gadgets of his jacket that will change the future of health-monitoring and improve our access to personal health care.


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Intent Data in the Age of Data Regulation

DECK 7 | March 23, 2020

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TScan and Novartis partner to develop cancer therapies

Pharmaceutical Technology | April 16, 2020

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BeiGene reports positive Phase III interim analysis for lung cancer drug

MedCity News | April 14, 2020

Interim results from a Phase III clinical trial have shown that patients receiving a cancer immunotherapy drug for a form of lung cancer on top of chemotherapy were more likely than those receiving chemotherapy alone to survive without their disease worsening, the company developing the drug said Monday. Beijing-based BeiGene reported an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) among first-line patients with non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving tislelizumab along with platinum chemotherapy and pemetrexed, compared with those receiving chemotherapy and pemetrexed alone. However, it did not disclose the data. The company said it plans to file for approval of the drug with Chinese drug regulators and present data from the study at upcoming medical conferences. Shares of BeiGene were up around 6% on the Nasdaq in Tuesday afternoon trading, following the after-hours announcement.

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Would-be coronavirus drugs are cheap to make

Science | April 10, 2020

With a vaccine for the novel coronavirus still likely a year or more away, the first weapon against the virus could be one of the drugs now in clinical trials with COVID-19 patients. A new analysis out today shows that many of these drugs, which are currently manufactured or in development to treat other diseases, can be made for $1 a day per patient, or less. If any prove effective against the novel coronavirus, a coordinated international effort will be needed to ensure they are made affordable for people worldwide, the researchers argue. Scientists worldwide are conducting clinical trials on at least a dozen potential treatments for COVID-19. Some compounds have been on the market for decades, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine used to combat malaria and lupus. That makes it relatively straightforward to estimate the minimum cost of making them, says Andrew Hill, a drug pricing specialist at the University of Liverpool.

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Spotlight

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Daniel Kraft shows us where technology can take us in health and medicine. He pulls out countless gadgets of his jacket that will change the future of health-monitoring and improve our access to personal health care.

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