Grifols to acquire Montreal-based plasma fractionation facility and two purification facilities for US$460 million

Grifols, Green Cross Corporation | July 21, 2020

Grifols to acquire Montreal-based plasma fractionation facility and two purification facilities for US$460 million
Grifols, a global healthcare company and one of world's top producers of plasma-derived medicines, today announced it has executed purchase arrangements with the South Korean-based GC Pharma (Group) whereby Grifols will acquire the Montreal-based plasma fractionation facility and two purification facilities, along with 11 U.S.-based plasma collection centers for a total amount of US$460 million.

The transaction is part of Grifols' sustainable global growth strategy to expand plasma collection and fractionation capacity to ensure patients worldwide have safe and secure access to life-saving plasma-derived medicines. Most importantly, this strategic acquisition will strengthen Grifols' presence in Canada, building on a legacy of partnership in Canada's blood system.

For more than three decades, Grifols has been a fractionator of Canadian plasma under contract manufacturing services, providing trusted plasma-derived medicines for Canadian patients and their healthcare providers. Throughout these many years Grifols has gained firsthand knowledge of the Canadian healthcare system. This transaction further demonstrates Grifols' commitment to supporting domestic self-sufficiency and security of plasma-protein-product supply.

Spotlight

The pharmaceutical industry is not short of challenges patent cliffs, regulatory scrutiny, and R&D productivity, as well as a complex supply chain. Pharmaceutical products see several changes of hands from the manufacturers to distributors to dispensers and, finally, the patients allowing easy entry of counterfeit drugs and drug diversions. According to estimates by the WHO, nearly $40 billion is lost each year to counterfeit products.


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Spotlight

The pharmaceutical industry is not short of challenges patent cliffs, regulatory scrutiny, and R&D productivity, as well as a complex supply chain. Pharmaceutical products see several changes of hands from the manufacturers to distributors to dispensers and, finally, the patients allowing easy entry of counterfeit drugs and drug diversions. According to estimates by the WHO, nearly $40 billion is lost each year to counterfeit products.

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