BMJ data suggests link between sugary drinks and cancer

A study published by The BMJ has reported a possible association between higher consumption of sugary drinks and and an increased risk of cancer. The data comes from a team of researchers based in France, who set out to assess the associations between the consumption of sugary drinks (sugar sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices), artificially sweetened beverages, and risk of overall cancer, as well as breast, prostate, and bowel cancers. The results show that a 100 ml per day increase in the consumption of sugary drinks was associated with an 18% increased risk of overall cancer and a 22% increased risk of breast cancer. In contrast, the consumption of artificially sweetened (diet) beverages was not associated with a risk of cancer, but the authors warn that caution is needed in interpreting this finding owing to a relatively low consumption level in this sample. Participants completed at least two 24 hour online validated dietary questionnaires, designed to measure usual intake of 3,300 different food and beverage items and were followed up for a maximum of nine years. Several well known risk factors for cancer, such as age, sex, educational level, family history of cancer, smoking status and physical activity levels, were taken into account.

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