Pharma Industry Is Prioritizing Big Data, Blockchain, Cloud Computing and Cybersecurity for Investments

Authority | November 05, 2019

Pharma Industry Is Prioritizing Big Data, Blockchain, Cloud Computing and Cybersecurity for Investments
Big data, blockchain, cloud computing and cybersecurity are the main technologies where pharma companies see the need to invest, the latest survey data from GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company, suggests. GlobalData’s latest report, ‘Emerging Technology Trends Survey – Pharma 2019’, reveals that over 70% of pharma executives, who have some level of responsibility with regards to the implementation of new and emerging technologies, prioritize data protection and storage solutions for their investments. “There is a sizable market on the dark web for healthcare industry related data and breaking into pharmaceutical companies’ systems can expose information related to clinical trials, trade secrets, and IP associated with drug formulation processes and technologies. Any cyberattack that leaks confidential information can affect not only revenues but also damage brand reputation, disrupt the supply chain, or result in litigating actions.” The pharmaceutical industry is one of the most regulated industries in the world, with companies being required to comply with a number of regulations covering areas ranging from clinical trials to manufacturing and advertising. Over the years, the pharmaceutical industry has seen healthcare authorities constantly imposing new regulations and compliance requirements, including the obligations to protect ever increasing amounts of sensitive, confidential data and to adhere to data protection laws and legislative requirements.

Spotlight

Several biopharmaceutical products are approved for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and other immune mediated disorders. They include biologic drugs such as the soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor fusion protein etanercept (Enbrel, Amgen/Pfizer), the chimeric monoclonal antibody infliximab (Remicade, Janssen), the human monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira, AbbVie), and others, such as interferongamma. Many of these medicines have structures based on monoclonal antibodies that differ in size and in their capacity to bind to the target ligand

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RESEARCH

UConn startup DIANT bags license for continuous nanoparticle manufacturing tech

UConn | November 20, 2020

Consistent assembling has just begun to override customary group handling in the domain of tablet creation. The following region due for an assembling update? Nanoparticle drug conveyance frameworks, one startup thinks—and it's currently prepared to pitch its foundation to drugmakers. The University of Connecticut as of late authorized its ceaseless nanoparticle fabricating innovation to DIANT Pharma, a startup helped to establish by the stage's designers Antonio Costa, Ph.D., and Diane Burgess, Ph.D. The high-throughput framework can possibly spare tidy up room space, bring down the quantity of preparing steps and diminish the quantity of bunches created every year. Since the stage is persistent, it should empower makers to hop in the event that anything turns out badly, redirecting or eliminating just a little bit of the item instead of rejecting a whole group, Costa, CEO at DIANT and partner research teacher at UConn, said in a meeting.

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PHARMA TECH

Feds rebuff Pfizer's pleas to speed up supplies of COVID-19 vaccine raw materials

Pfizer | December 21, 2020

Since the time Pfizer was fixed to partake in the U.S. government's Warp Speed exertion to get COVID-19 antibodies to showcase, the organization has made it very clear it didn't have to take any bureaucratic cash to build up the immunization. In any case, did that refusal of R&D subsidizing add to Pfizer's failure to produce more dosages of its mRNA antibody for the U.S. market? Pfizer could give more than the 100 million portions it guaranteed in its unique agreement with the U.S. government in the main portion of one year from now—however just if Trump organization authorities request that providers of crude materials rapidly satisfy the organization's requests. Furthermore, CEO Albert Bourla, Ph.D., is approaching the public authority to utilize the Defense Production Act to do precisely that. The Trump organization hasn't done as such yet on the grounds that they've zeroed in on giving those materials to antibody producers that took government R&D subsidizing, as Moderna, as indicated by anonymous sources who addressed The New York Times. A representative for Pfizer declined to remark, refering to the privacy of conversations with the U.S. government. Yet, Bourla said during a CNBC meet that the organization is in exchanges to sell an extra 100 million dosages of Pfizer's COVID-19 immunization to the U.S. government. "We can give a ton of that in the second from last quarter. The U.S. government needs it in the subsequent quarter," Bourla said in the Monday meet. "We are working cooperatively to attempt to discover an answer and have the option to apportion those 100 million [doses] in the subsequent quarter if conceivable, or a ton of them." Pfizer mentioned almost immediately that the public authority grant it "supported status" with providers of crude materials, however authorities were anxious about the possibility that that would harm contending immunization programs that took government R&D cash, as per the Times report. Among those organizations is Moderna, which is required to win crisis use approval from the FDA for its mRNA immunization this week—and last Friday, inked an arrangement to add 100 million additional portions to its underlying U.S. request.

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Neuraxpharm and Panaxia Global have entered a comprehensive agreement to start a business collaboration

Panaxia Global, Neuraxpharm | July 22, 2020

Neuraxpharm, a leading European pharmaceutical company specialized in CNS, and Panaxia Global, the controlling owner of Panaxia Labs Israel (Panaxia Israel) (TASE: PNAX), Israel's largest medical cannabis manufacturer, announced today they have entered a definite agreement to start a business collaboration for marketing Panaxia's medical cannabis products in Germany, Europe's largest and fastest-growing market for cannabis in Europe. The agreement, which anchors a previous MOU entered by the companies, includes exclusivity for Panaxia products, as well as an option for scaling the distribution to additional countries, also including further major European countries. The agreement is one of a kind in the cannabis industry. It represents the first time a global pharma company of Neuraxpharm caliber marketing medical cannabis products as part of its broad prescription and non-prescription product portfolio. On top of distributing the products to pharmacies through local distributors, the venture will focus on marketing efforts to the relevant target audiences in Germany, namely the prescribing physicians, and the patients. The marketing activity is critical for the success of commercial sales and will be implemented according to the standards used in the pharmaceutical industry.

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Spotlight

Several biopharmaceutical products are approved for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and other immune mediated disorders. They include biologic drugs such as the soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor fusion protein etanercept (Enbrel, Amgen/Pfizer), the chimeric monoclonal antibody infliximab (Remicade, Janssen), the human monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira, AbbVie), and others, such as interferongamma. Many of these medicines have structures based on monoclonal antibodies that differ in size and in their capacity to bind to the target ligand