Owlstone Medical, Actelion team up for pulmonary hypertension detection

pharmatimes | May 20, 2019

Owlstone Medical, Actelion team up for pulmonary hypertension detection
Owlstone Medical has announced a strategic partnership with Actelion Pharmaceuticals. The global leader in Breath Biopsy for applications in early disease detection announced the collaboration to discover and validate a breath-based test to help facilitate the early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and its subtypes. This development program will be solely funded by Actelion. Currently, early diagnosis of PH is very difficult, and even at an advanced stage presents similar to other heart and lung conditions, so a delay of years between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis and treatment is unfortunately common. The collaboration will initially involve collecting breath exhaled Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from over 1,000 patients using Owlstone Medical’s proprietary sampling device, which will then be analysed by Owlstone Medical to identify those that are associated with PH, in order to develop biomarker signatures that can help facilitate earlier detection of the disease.

Spotlight

PMMI, The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies, examined the latest trends impacting the pharmaceutical and medical device markets. The 2016 Pharmaceutical & Medical Devices report offers insights from 60 industry experts—describing market trends, product innovations, future equipment needs, and operational and regulatory challenges.

Related News

Major pharma companies including Novartis and Merck build federated learning platform for drug discovery

Venturebeat | September 17, 2020

Last June, 10 major pharmaceutical companies — Amgen, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, GSK, Institut De Recherches Servier, Janssen, Merck, and Novartis — inked an agreement to build a shared platform called MELLODDY (Machine Learning Ledger Orchestration for Drug Discovery). In partnership with Nvidia, Owkin, and other tech partners, the group sought to leverage techniques like federated learning to collectively train AI on datasets without having to share any proprietary data.

Read More

RESEARCH

Eli Lilly wins FDA's emergency nod for COVID-19 antibody—but, thanks to mixed data, it's limited

Eli Lilly | November 11, 2020

The U.S. just had another COVID-19 drug authorized for emergency use. But the approval is limited—and, with at least one vaccine launch on the horizon, industry watchers wonder whether drugs to treat the illness have any staying power. The FDA authorized Eli Lilly’s bamlanivimab for emergency use on Monday, making it the first antibody therapy to win that distinction. Dubbed LY-CoV555, it's an anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody therapy the Indianapolis pharma is co-developing with AbCellera. The OK comes with some caveats: It's limited to patients 12 years and older who aren't hospitalized but who are at high risk of developing severe illness, including elderly people and those with certain underlying conditions. And Lilly is advising infusion within 10 days of symptom onset.

Read More

U.S. states build stockpiles of malaria drug touted by Trump

Abcnews | April 26, 2020

State and local governments across the United States have obtained about 30 million doses of a malaria drug touted by President Trump to treat patients with the coronavirus, despite warnings from doctors that more research is needed. At least 22 states and Washington, D.C., secured shipments of the drug, hydroxychloroquine, according to information compiled from state and federal officials by The Associated Press. Sixteen of those states were won by Trump in 2016, although five of them, including North Carolina and Louisiana, are now led by Democratic governors. Supporters say having a supply on hand makes sense in case the drug is shown to be effective against the pandemic that has devastated the global economy and killed nearly 200,000 people worldwide, and to ensure a steady supply for people who need it for other conditions like lupus. But health experts worry that having the drug easily available at a time of heightened public fear could make it easier to misuse it. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday warned doctors against prescribing the drug, hydroxychloroquine, for treating the coronavirus outside of hospitals or research settings because of reports of serious side effects, including dangerous irregular heart rhythms and death among patients.

Read More

Spotlight

PMMI, The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies, examined the latest trends impacting the pharmaceutical and medical device markets. The 2016 Pharmaceutical & Medical Devices report offers insights from 60 industry experts—describing market trends, product innovations, future equipment needs, and operational and regulatory challenges.