Coronavirus: The Latest Problem Big Pharma Won’t Solve

Barron's | February 07, 2020

Coronavirus: The Latest Problem Big Pharma Won’t Solve
Time for new pharmaceutical-innovation models. The pharmaceutical industry is one of the most profitable on earth, expected to be worth $1.4 trillion by the end of 2020. Last year, the four drug companies that dominated the vaccine market made $30 billion selling vaccines. The pharmaceutical industry benefits from considerable incentives, including in the form of patents and other market monopolies to sustain vaccine and treatment prices well above production cost. Society pays this price—in theory—because it enables the industry to generate money needed to invest in developing new health innovations. With the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, a disease for which there is neither a vaccine nor an effective drug treatment, the call for such innovations is growing louder by the day. With global sales in vaccines alone totaling $54 billion in 2019 and predicted to near $60 billion in 2020, one would think that industry has the reserves to jump at this challenge. But so far, as reported by Barron’s, none of the four top vaccine companies has shown significant interest.

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Injuries which occur on regular basis in day today routine of hospital and healthcare setups. The Plethora of new injectable products has created new opportunities for physicians to treat areas previously thought to be not reachable.

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Seven pharmaceutical stocks that stand to win beyond the Covid-19 chase

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It’s easy to miss the forest for the trees in markets like this. Especially when it comes to pharmaceutical stocks. What I mean is that, in some sectors, there are great stocks that get overlooked because a few of them are working on event-driven issues, while others are creating long-term solutions to major trends. This is especially true in the pharmaceutical and biotech spaces right now. Maybe it’s because the Kentucky Derby was postponed, but people are betting on pharmas discovering a vaccine to Covid-19 like it’s the only horse race out there. The fact is, there’s a whole racing season and betting on one horse in one race isn’t successful investing. And neither is betting on pharmaceutical stocks for one medicine. That’s where my grading system comes in. Overall, there are plenty of massively successful drugs. However, they’re blockbusters because they can be used for a variety ailments. Or, the top companies have a strong pipeline of drugs that address issues that are important to a large number of people.

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PHARMA TECH

Moderna hitches a ride with Uber to boost vaccine confidence—and, of course, drive access

Moderna | January 15, 2021

COVID-19 vaccine maker Moderna is looking for a lift from Uber—a collaboration lift, that is. The two companies say they're planning to work together to promote vaccine confidence and ease access to coronavirus shots. Early ideas include promoting vaccine safety on the Uber network and through in-app messages as well as incorporating Uber rides into the vaccination scheduling process. While those details are still in the works, the appeal of Uber as a partner for Moderna is not only its nationwide network and connections but also the diversity of its 1.2 million drivers. “Uber has broad access across the United States—its ride-sharing platform is used by Americans everywhere, and its drivers represent a wide variety of the population," Michael Mullette, Moderna's vice president of commercial operations in North America, said. "There’s a great opportunity for us to think about educating the population about how do you get immunized … but also how do you access credible information about vaccines." The deal comes amid a U.S. vaccine rollout hobbled by confusion, lack of centralized government planning and distribution headaches. Even when vaccines are readily available and easy to access, fear is hampering uptake, thanks to the unprecedented speed of vaccine development, historical abuse of the Black community in biomedical research and more generalized anti-vaxxer sentiment. Last month, Uber pledged 10 million free or discounted rides for underserved populations who may have difficulty with transportation to get vaccines. The company is partnering with the National Urban League, the Morehouse School of Medicine and the National Action Network to focus on communities of color where people have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

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Moderna, AstraZeneca and J&J coronavirus shots rev up for NIH tests beginning in July: WSJ

Fiercepharma | June 10, 2020

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Spotlight

Injuries which occur on regular basis in day today routine of hospital and healthcare setups. The Plethora of new injectable products has created new opportunities for physicians to treat areas previously thought to be not reachable.