How are drugs designed and developed?

| March 13, 2018

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What is a drug?
• Drugs are chemical or biological substances that have some kind of physiological? or biochemical? effect on our bodies.
• They may be single compounds or a mixture of different compounds.
• Their effects are intended to be beneficial but can cause harmful side effects in some people.

Spotlight

Neumentum, Inc.

Neumentum is developing and plans to commercialize products that have the potential to effectively treat pain, without the risks of abuse, misuse and diversion seen with opioid analgesics. Neumentum’s lead product candidate, NTM-001 (novel, alcohol-free formulation of ketorolac in a pre-mixed bag for continuous IV infusion), has the potential to treat moderately severe acute pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level for up to 24 hours, usually in a postoperative setting, and to reduce the need for opioids.

OTHER ARTICLES

Comparing HydroxyChloroquine Trials

Article | April 1, 2020

One minor side effect of the pandemic is that perhaps more people will learn about what drug research and clinical trials can really be like. Today’s example: we have a clinical trial of hydroxychloroquine from Wuhan that has just published on a preprint server. What’s good is that this one is blinded, randomized, and controlled (like the earlier hydroxychloroquine which one I blogged about here from Zhejiang University, so we can actually talk about it rather than just spend all our time wondering what the heck is going on.

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5 Pharma Trends and Their Impact on Packaging

Article | April 1, 2020

The pharmaceutical industry is changing at an unprecedented pace. New biological treatments for cancer, and a dramatic rise of widespread diseases such as diabetes, call for new processing and packaging solutions to fulfill the different needs all over the world. Keep your eye on these five main packaging trends for 2020 for the global pharmaceutical market.

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What do you have to lose taking hydroxychloroquine for coronavirus? Potentially your life

Article | April 1, 2020

The president and some of his close advisors — desperate for a COVID-19 cure — are asking “What do you have to lose?” by taking hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a strong medication never adequately tested for efficacy or safety in COVID-19 patients. The correct answer to the president’s question, which he doesn’t seem to want to hear, is that we have our lives to lose. The president acknowledges “I’m not a doctor” but this raises the question “What do doctors know about the drug recommended by the president? Most doctors are aware that HCQ can be effective for patients with malaria, arthritis or lupus. If they were to follow the president’s suggestion and prescribe it for COVID-19 patients, they would also like to know that it will benefit some of those patients, at least.

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Coronavirus Pandemic Brings Hundreds Of U.S. Clinical Trials To A Halt

Article | April 1, 2020

Rene Roach fired off a quick email in late March for an update on a colorectal cancer clinical trial for which she hoped to qualify. Worried about the coronavirus, she asked, almost as an afterthought, whether the study had been put on hold because of the pandemic.The answer crushed her: It had been. "That's when COVID-19 shut down everything," says Roach, 50, of Germantown, Md. Roach assumed that there would be workarounds for patients like her, who have stage IV cancer. These patients often depend on clinical trials as their best chance to knock cancer out when other therapies have failed. For now, she's being treated with traditional chemotherapy, but she was counting on the drug cocktail from the clinical trial. She figures if chemo was going to rid her body of cancer for good, it would have done so already.

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Spotlight

Neumentum, Inc.

Neumentum is developing and plans to commercialize products that have the potential to effectively treat pain, without the risks of abuse, misuse and diversion seen with opioid analgesics. Neumentum’s lead product candidate, NTM-001 (novel, alcohol-free formulation of ketorolac in a pre-mixed bag for continuous IV infusion), has the potential to treat moderately severe acute pain that requires analgesia at the opioid level for up to 24 hours, usually in a postoperative setting, and to reduce the need for opioids.

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