Hospitals Making Drugs?

DEREK LOWE | January 19, 2018

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This story from the New York Times got a lot of attention yesterday, and understandably so. It’s fundamentally about the shortage of some generic drugs, a problem that’s been with us for some years now in one form or another. My own belief is that much of this is a regulatory problem, and I note that Scott Gottleib, the current FDA commissioner, has said that he wants to do something about the situation (or these situations, more properly, since there are several factors).

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