Brookfield eyes Mytrah Energy; Carlyle, Cadila team up for Bharat Serums bid

| April 22, 2019

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Canada’s Brookfield Asset Management Inc. is looking to acquire a majority stake in Mytrah Energy Ltd in a deal that could be valued as much as $1.5 billion, the Mint newspaper reported, citing three people aware of the development. Hyderabad-based Mytrah has a portfolio of 1.6 gigawatt of renewable energy projects and has been looking for an investor for almost a year. The Mint report said that the company needs to repay a loan of Rs 1,800 crore that it had taken from Piramal Group in September 2017 to buy out its private equity investors. Brookfield has so far focussed on infrastructure and real estate sectors in India, but also has a presence in the renewable energy sector thanks to its 2017 acquisition of US firm SunEdison Inc.

Spotlight

PT Anugerah Pharmindo Lestari

PT Anugerah Pharmindo Lestari (APL) has been successfully serving the Indonesian healthcare market since 1985. We make available high quality healthcare products for patients and consumers across the complex geography and multi-channel environment of Indonesia. In our line of business, customer coverage, reach and service levels are the most important and necessary core competencies of our organization. Our wide distribution network meets the needs of the market in all of the 34 provinces. We operate 33 pharma-grade warehouses of highest international quality standards in 28 cities across Indonesia. The APL sales forces cover a total of 434 cities with a directly served customer base of 28,000+ accounts. 100,000 general trade accounts are served through a customized regional sub-distribution network.

OTHER ARTICLES

What do you have to lose taking hydroxychloroquine for coronavirus? Potentially your life

Article | April 10, 2020

The president and some of his close advisors — desperate for a COVID-19 cure — are asking “What do you have to lose?” by taking hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a strong medication never adequately tested for efficacy or safety in COVID-19 patients. The correct answer to the president’s question, which he doesn’t seem to want to hear, is that we have our lives to lose. The president acknowledges “I’m not a doctor” but this raises the question “What do doctors know about the drug recommended by the president? Most doctors are aware that HCQ can be effective for patients with malaria, arthritis or lupus. If they were to follow the president’s suggestion and prescribe it for COVID-19 patients, they would also like to know that it will benefit some of those patients, at least.

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The Future of Pharma Beyond Blockbusters

Article | March 17, 2020

We’ve all heard the saying “treat the patient, not the disease”, and this couldn’t be truer in today’s ever-changing pharmaceutical landscape. We are living in a time of revolution – advancements in genomics and technology are improving our ability to develop precise drugs and targeted therapies, rather than focusing on a one size fits all approach. Each individual’s genetic makeup is slightly different from everyone else’s,

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New Dimensions of Clinical Trial Optimization

Article | April 20, 2021

For much of the past three decades, even as methodologies for clinical trial design have advanced and refined, the idea of the optimized clinical trial has centered on optimal patient samples, target enrollment rates, and generally the most efficient uses of scarce resources in the form of patients. Yet anyone who has had to design and optimize a clinical trial, knows that trial optimization occurs within an ecosystem of choices; a series of choices that stretch from the time it takes to implement a clinical trial and submit clinical data for analysis, to general concerns about the cost and power of a clinical trial. A true clinical trial optimization process would try to unify a number of these choices into a single framework for trial optimization. The complexity of clinical trial optimization comes from the need to align priorities on the one hand, and to understand opportunities on the other. We know that at a very general level, clinical operations specialists benefit from simplicity in clinical trial design, and that commercial teams prefer shorter clinical trials to longer ones. We also know that the statistical design of a clinical trial can influence both simplicity and duration. Yet how many sponsors have their clinical operations and commercial teams, sit with their R&D teams to review various statistically nuanced design options? For many sponsors, the reason this process does not occur as often as it should, is because the nuanced statistical parameters of a clinical trial design are very difficult to communicate to non-statisticians. Yet a trial optimization tool like Solara, equipped with data visualizations and the ability to see tradeoffs intuitively, can overcome this challenge. The real challenge is often convincing the non-statistician that they have a stake in clinical trial design. Cytel recently had a client that thought it needed a sample size re-estimation design, because it had a very strict limit on the number of patients it could enroll. After a few hours of working with Solara, though, a statistician discovered that a much simpler Group Sequential Design would deliver comparable power using about the same number of patients. The gains from the more complex design were minimal from the optimization perspective, when understood as the eco-system of choices. Similarly, most commercial teams pressure their clinical trial designers to have the most accelerated clinical trial imaginable, but as we all know, the longer the clinical trial the more likely there will be a higher number of events that demonstrate the effectiveness of a new medicine. So commercialization teams have a stake in longer clinical trials, even when their rule of thumb is to shorten them. Therefore, it is absolutely essential to communicate the benefits of various statistical designs to multiple stakeholders in a way that makes tradeoffs clear. Aligning on priorities early during the clinical trial design process is essential to selecting the optimal clinical trial. Yet for this statisticians need to be equipped for both a strategic and communicative role in the R&D process.

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What to Watch in 2020: Non-Specialty Drugs

Article | March 1, 2020

Pharmaceutical manufacturers are constantly working to develop new and improved medications. Join us as we explore the non-specialty drugs you should be watching in 2020. If you missed last week’s article about the most important upcoming specialty drugs, be sure to check it out here. Approximately 40 new medications are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) every year.1 (Please note: If you’re curious about what it takes to develop a drug and bring it to market, check out our previous article). Why should you care about these new medications? Because they can affect both your organization’s pharmacy spend and your members’ cost share. For non-specialty drugs, we will focus on medications that may come to market this year, including ones that are currently being reviewed by the FDA, or that are in the last clinical trial (Phase III) stage.

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Spotlight

PT Anugerah Pharmindo Lestari

PT Anugerah Pharmindo Lestari (APL) has been successfully serving the Indonesian healthcare market since 1985. We make available high quality healthcare products for patients and consumers across the complex geography and multi-channel environment of Indonesia. In our line of business, customer coverage, reach and service levels are the most important and necessary core competencies of our organization. Our wide distribution network meets the needs of the market in all of the 34 provinces. We operate 33 pharma-grade warehouses of highest international quality standards in 28 cities across Indonesia. The APL sales forces cover a total of 434 cities with a directly served customer base of 28,000+ accounts. 100,000 general trade accounts are served through a customized regional sub-distribution network.

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