Ayurvedic Treatment for Broken Capillaries (Spider Veins)

| March 2, 2019

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Broken capillaries appear when the vein wall is too weak to withstand the pressure of the blood being pumped around the body. Reduced resistance of the vein walls is common in women during menopause, when broken capillaries in the arms and legs can mean reduced oestrogen levels (hormonal imbalance). Hereditary factors and environmental conditions also play an important role. Broken capillaries can appear due to sun exposure and also substance abuse.  Does your family have a history of heart disease and blood clots? Apart from the feet, are there visible capillaries on the face?

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Idifarma Desarrollo Farmacéutico, S.L.

Idifarma is a leading Contract Development Organization for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Based in Spain, but with an increasingly international reach, Idifarma provides a full range of services that encompasses: drug formulation, development and validation of analytical methods, quality control and batch release in the EU, Pilot-Scale GMP-compliant manufacturing, ICH stability studies, clinical trial logistics management and regulatory support. Now, we can also manufacture commercial batches of high potency and conventional oral solids.

OTHER ARTICLES

How Can Medical Cannabis Help to Manage Pain Conditions? – The Cannabis Exchange

Article | February 11, 2020

Pain management is one of the most common reasons for the use of medical cannabis products. However, despite many jurisdictions – including Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands – now allowing the prescription of medical cannabis for this purpose, there remains little ‘high-quality’ evidence to support, or oppose its efficacy. Madden et al. (2018) set out to review the evidence available in order to determine the efficacy of medical cannabis when employed in the management of various forms of musculoskeletal pain. The researchers analysed various studies that assessed the use of cannabinoids in the treatment of arthritis pain; back pain; postoperative pain; and trauma-related pain. It is estimated that up to 30% of the population may suffer from a non-cancer-related pain condition. As such a high percentage of people suffer from these conditions, the development of simple and safe therapies is an essential area of research. This is particularly important as the therapeutic options for people with chronic pain are increasingly limited.

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Tips for Managing Chronic Pain Beyond Prescription Painkillers

Article | February 17, 2020

Painkillers like Oxycontin, Percocet, and Vicodin, have been prescribed by primary physicians, surgeons, dentists, and other healthcare providers to patients suffering from varying levels of pain. Though these medications have proven to be an effective source of pain relief, they have also proven to be highly addictive. In fact, it has even been reported that there are more cases of a drug overdose and deaths from prescription painkillers than heroin or cocaine. While there are a number of factors that play into this opioid epidemic, educating doctors and patients on alternative solutions to managing chronic pain is a great place to start combatting this nationwide crisis.

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New Dimensions of Clinical Trial Optimization

Article | April 20, 2021

For much of the past three decades, even as methodologies for clinical trial design have advanced and refined, the idea of the optimized clinical trial has centered on optimal patient samples, target enrollment rates, and generally the most efficient uses of scarce resources in the form of patients. Yet anyone who has had to design and optimize a clinical trial, knows that trial optimization occurs within an ecosystem of choices; a series of choices that stretch from the time it takes to implement a clinical trial and submit clinical data for analysis, to general concerns about the cost and power of a clinical trial. A true clinical trial optimization process would try to unify a number of these choices into a single framework for trial optimization. The complexity of clinical trial optimization comes from the need to align priorities on the one hand, and to understand opportunities on the other. We know that at a very general level, clinical operations specialists benefit from simplicity in clinical trial design, and that commercial teams prefer shorter clinical trials to longer ones. We also know that the statistical design of a clinical trial can influence both simplicity and duration. Yet how many sponsors have their clinical operations and commercial teams, sit with their R&D teams to review various statistically nuanced design options? For many sponsors, the reason this process does not occur as often as it should, is because the nuanced statistical parameters of a clinical trial design are very difficult to communicate to non-statisticians. Yet a trial optimization tool like Solara, equipped with data visualizations and the ability to see tradeoffs intuitively, can overcome this challenge. The real challenge is often convincing the non-statistician that they have a stake in clinical trial design. Cytel recently had a client that thought it needed a sample size re-estimation design, because it had a very strict limit on the number of patients it could enroll. After a few hours of working with Solara, though, a statistician discovered that a much simpler Group Sequential Design would deliver comparable power using about the same number of patients. The gains from the more complex design were minimal from the optimization perspective, when understood as the eco-system of choices. Similarly, most commercial teams pressure their clinical trial designers to have the most accelerated clinical trial imaginable, but as we all know, the longer the clinical trial the more likely there will be a higher number of events that demonstrate the effectiveness of a new medicine. So commercialization teams have a stake in longer clinical trials, even when their rule of thumb is to shorten them. Therefore, it is absolutely essential to communicate the benefits of various statistical designs to multiple stakeholders in a way that makes tradeoffs clear. Aligning on priorities early during the clinical trial design process is essential to selecting the optimal clinical trial. Yet for this statisticians need to be equipped for both a strategic and communicative role in the R&D process.

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What to Watch in 2020: Non-Specialty Drugs

Article | March 1, 2020

Pharmaceutical manufacturers are constantly working to develop new and improved medications. Join us as we explore the non-specialty drugs you should be watching in 2020. If you missed last week’s article about the most important upcoming specialty drugs, be sure to check it out here. Approximately 40 new medications are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) every year.1 (Please note: If you’re curious about what it takes to develop a drug and bring it to market, check out our previous article). Why should you care about these new medications? Because they can affect both your organization’s pharmacy spend and your members’ cost share. For non-specialty drugs, we will focus on medications that may come to market this year, including ones that are currently being reviewed by the FDA, or that are in the last clinical trial (Phase III) stage.

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Spotlight

Idifarma Desarrollo Farmacéutico, S.L.

Idifarma is a leading Contract Development Organization for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Based in Spain, but with an increasingly international reach, Idifarma provides a full range of services that encompasses: drug formulation, development and validation of analytical methods, quality control and batch release in the EU, Pilot-Scale GMP-compliant manufacturing, ICH stability studies, clinical trial logistics management and regulatory support. Now, we can also manufacture commercial batches of high potency and conventional oral solids.

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