2018 Pharmaceutical & Medical Device Industry Trends: Get the Guide

| February 1, 2018

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Knowing for certain what the future holds is impossible. Trends, on the other hand, are more predictable. In fact, there’s probably no better indicator of emerging or future trends than recent history. That is exactly how we determined the trends we anticipate seeing in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries in 2018.

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Akvaforsk Genetics

Akvaforsk Genetics is the leading provider of technical genetic improvement services to aquaculture industries worldwide. We have extensive experience in design, implementation and routine technical operation from more than 25 applied selective breeding programs for fish and crustacean species in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These programs cover the majority of the commercially important farmed aquaculture species, including salmonids, tilapias, marine fish and shrimp. We routinely conduct external reviews of third party broodstock management and breeding program operations.

OTHER ARTICLES

How AI and Big Data Will Disrupt Pharma’s Regulatory Compliance Standards

Article | March 4, 2020

The industry as we know it is changing. Pharmaceutical and life sciences companies across the globe are experiencing more pressure than ever to keep up with increased regulatory standards while moving at a pace that requires them to innovate in order to remain competitive. With more real-time automation and the steady increase in AI and Big Data sweeping the landscape, what used to be a slow-to-change and risk-averse industry is now expected to see a significant shift towards newer technology that focus on heightened regulatory standards. Here’s how your company can get ahead of what industry experts are calling, Pharma

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Coronavirus Pandemic Brings Hundreds Of U.S. Clinical Trials To A Halt

Article | March 4, 2020

Rene Roach fired off a quick email in late March for an update on a colorectal cancer clinical trial for which she hoped to qualify. Worried about the coronavirus, she asked, almost as an afterthought, whether the study had been put on hold because of the pandemic.The answer crushed her: It had been. "That's when COVID-19 shut down everything," says Roach, 50, of Germantown, Md. Roach assumed that there would be workarounds for patients like her, who have stage IV cancer. These patients often depend on clinical trials as their best chance to knock cancer out when other therapies have failed. For now, she's being treated with traditional chemotherapy, but she was counting on the drug cocktail from the clinical trial. She figures if chemo was going to rid her body of cancer for good, it would have done so already.

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PHARMACY MARKET

A pharma outsourcing mission

Article | March 4, 2020

In a way, getting through the initial stages of a complex pharmaceutical project that is being outsourced to a contract development and manufacturing organization is like getting a rocket off the ground. Many drug developers express frustration with the time it often takes during the initial stages of working with a CDMO — from the time they first reach out to a CDMO for help until they receive a proposal. Some have described it as months of silence from when they send a request for proposal (RFP) until they have a proposal in hand. The initial stages of a relationship between drug sponsor and CDMO often do not get the attention it deserves, and valuable time is lost, delaying projects and delaying delivery of therapeutics to patients. The quick scheduling of the ACT meeting with the right attendees can deliver immediate answers to key questions needed by the drug sponsor for effective planning and can help propel projects to a successful launch.

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VIEWS AND ANALYSIS

New Dimensions of Clinical Trial Optimization

Article | March 4, 2020

For much of the past three decades, even as methodologies for clinical trial design have advanced and refined, the idea of the optimized clinical trial has centered on optimal patient samples, target enrollment rates, and generally the most efficient uses of scarce resources in the form of patients. Yet anyone who has had to design and optimize a clinical trial, knows that trial optimization occurs within an ecosystem of choices; a series of choices that stretch from the time it takes to implement a clinical trial and submit clinical data for analysis, to general concerns about the cost and power of a clinical trial. A true clinical trial optimization process would try to unify a number of these choices into a single framework for trial optimization. The complexity of clinical trial optimization comes from the need to align priorities on the one hand, and to understand opportunities on the other. We know that at a very general level, clinical operations specialists benefit from simplicity in clinical trial design, and that commercial teams prefer shorter clinical trials to longer ones. We also know that the statistical design of a clinical trial can influence both simplicity and duration. Yet how many sponsors have their clinical operations and commercial teams, sit with their R&D teams to review various statistically nuanced design options? For many sponsors, the reason this process does not occur as often as it should, is because the nuanced statistical parameters of a clinical trial design are very difficult to communicate to non-statisticians. Yet a trial optimization tool like Solara, equipped with data visualizations and the ability to see tradeoffs intuitively, can overcome this challenge. The real challenge is often convincing the non-statistician that they have a stake in clinical trial design. Cytel recently had a client that thought it needed a sample size re-estimation design, because it had a very strict limit on the number of patients it could enroll. After a few hours of working with Solara, though, a statistician discovered that a much simpler Group Sequential Design would deliver comparable power using about the same number of patients. The gains from the more complex design were minimal from the optimization perspective, when understood as the eco-system of choices. Similarly, most commercial teams pressure their clinical trial designers to have the most accelerated clinical trial imaginable, but as we all know, the longer the clinical trial the more likely there will be a higher number of events that demonstrate the effectiveness of a new medicine. So commercialization teams have a stake in longer clinical trials, even when their rule of thumb is to shorten them. Therefore, it is absolutely essential to communicate the benefits of various statistical designs to multiple stakeholders in a way that makes tradeoffs clear. Aligning on priorities early during the clinical trial design process is essential to selecting the optimal clinical trial. Yet for this statisticians need to be equipped for both a strategic and communicative role in the R&D process.

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Spotlight

Akvaforsk Genetics

Akvaforsk Genetics is the leading provider of technical genetic improvement services to aquaculture industries worldwide. We have extensive experience in design, implementation and routine technical operation from more than 25 applied selective breeding programs for fish and crustacean species in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These programs cover the majority of the commercially important farmed aquaculture species, including salmonids, tilapias, marine fish and shrimp. We routinely conduct external reviews of third party broodstock management and breeding program operations.

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