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How exercise can counter the effects of jet lag HOW EXERCISE CAN COUNTER THE EFFECTS OF JET LAG

blog article

Feb 22, 2019

New research in The Journal of Physiology suggests that exercising at certain times of the day can alter the circadian rhythms, potentially offering a new therapy for jet lag and shift work. Circadian rhythms, which are "physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a daily cycle," ...

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Patient Access: A Step by Step Guide PATIENT ACCESS: A STEP BY STEP GUIDE

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

In the most basic sense, patient access refers to the ability of patients and their families to take charge of their own health care. With the advent of the internet and digital marketing, medical practices and businesses have a new way to reach their target audiences. This has slowly empowered pati...

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How These 8 Medication Management Activities Can Help Patients HOW THESE 8 MEDICATION MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES CAN HELP PATIENTS

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

Medication management is a patient-focused approach to helping patients take their medicines properly and consistently refill their prescriptions. Implementing a medication management program can improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary visits to the emergency room or hospital, and reduce the ne...

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Acupuncture may reduce menopause symptoms ACUPUNCTURE MAY REDUCE MENOPAUSE SYMPTOMS

blog article

Feb 21, 2019

A recent study concludes that just a relatively short course of acupuncture could significantly reduce some of the most unpleasant symptoms of menopause. Menopause typically begins in the sixth decade of life and continues for an average of 4–5 years. The symptoms of menopause can reduce overa...

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Can we halt cellular aging? New drug combo shows promise CAN WE HALT CELLULAR AGING? NEW DRUG COMBO SHOWS PROMISE

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Aging cells can become toxic to surrounding tissue, thus leading to numerous health problems. A class of drugs scientists calls senolytics could help address these health issues, and improve symptoms. Senolytics are a class of drugs that target cells that have entered senescence, meaning an old...

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What causes post-cesarean wound infections? WHAT CAUSES POST-CESAREAN WOUND INFECTIONS?

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Post-Cesarean wound infection can occur when bacteria get into the incision wound. Doctors can treat surgical wound infections with medications and proper wound care.
An estimated 3–15 percent of woman develop an infection in their cesarean incision wounds. This article looks at the cau...

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Treating constipation in Crohn TREATING CONSTIPATION IN CROHN'S DISEASE

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Crohn's disease tends to cause frequent diarrhea, but it can also cause constipation. This constipation may result from medications, other health conditions, or lifestyle factors. Doctors consider a person to have constipation if they have fewer than three bowel movements a week. Other symptoms ...

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Transcendental meditation can help treat PTSD TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION CAN HELP TREAT PTSD

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Working with a cohort of young people with symptoms of PTSD and depression, researchers found that practicing transcendental meditation can help reduce or even reverse these symptoms. Studies have shown that meditation practices can have a significant, positive effect on mental health and how w...

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Aggressive brain cancer: Why does immunotherapy fail? AGGRESSIVE BRAIN CANCER: WHY DOES IMMUNOTHERAPY FAIL?

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

New research that now appears in the journal Nature Medicine examined glioblastoma tumors, and the results move scientists closer to understanding why this form of brain cancer does not respond as well to immunotherapy as other cancers. Immunotherapy is a treatment type that aims to boost the immune...

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Light-based production of drug discovery molecules LIGHT-BASED PRODUCTION OF DRUG DISCOVERY MOLECULES

blog article

Feb 20, 2019

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells are widely studied for the conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels. They use photocathodes and photoanodes to “split” water into hydrogen and oxygen respectively. PEC cells can work under mild conditions with light, which makes them also suitable f...

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There THERE'S MUCH WORK TO BE DONE: 8 MEDICAL ERRORS STATISTICS TO KNOW

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

Preventing medical errors must be a high priority for any healthcare provider. They are avoidable, and yet every year, medical errors greatly harm and kill patients nationwide. We know these claims to be true because of the medical errors statistics available to back them up. Here are eight medical ...

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Flu breakthrough: Universal vaccine may be in sight FLU BREAKTHROUGH: UNIVERSAL VACCINE MAY BE IN SIGHT

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

Researchers have studied various flu strains and found that the body's so-called killer immune cells offer protection against all influenza viruses. Influenza A, B, and C viruses are widespread globally and infect a significant number of children and adults each year. For example, during the 201...

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Ability to do pushups may predict cardiovascular risk ABILITY TO DO PUSHUPS MAY PREDICT CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

A new study suggests that the more pushups a man is able to complete, the lower his cardiovascular risk and vice versa. These findings may establish a new measure of risk assessment that is simple and does not require costly specialized equipment. World Health Organization (WHO) data indicate t...

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'SMILING DEPRESSION': IT'S POSSIBLE TO BE DEPRESSED WHILE APPEARING HAPPY

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

The term “smiling depression” – appearing happy to others while internally suffering depressive symptoms has become increasingly popular. Articles on the topic have crept up in the popular literature, and the number of Google searches for the condition has increased dramatically th...

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Depression: Gene-activating drug reverses symptoms in mice DEPRESSION: GENE-ACTIVATING DRUG REVERSES SYMPTOMS IN MICE

blog article

Feb 19, 2019

New research shows that activating a gene that, in turn, boosts the activity of certain neurons involved in depression can reverse symptoms of the condition in male mice. Depression is "the leading cause of disability worldwide," as more than 300 million people across the globe are li...

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Gender transition drugs could be bad for the heart GENDER TRANSITION DRUGS COULD BE BAD FOR THE HEART

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

New research now published in the journal Circulation finds that some people who are gender transitioning may be at a higher risk of experiencing cardiovascular conditions due to the hormone therapy they are receiving. Previous studies have revealed that hormone therapy raises cardiovascular risk. F...

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Mediterranean Diet Works By Adding Up Small Improvements MEDITERRANEAN DIET WORKS BY ADDING UP SMALL IMPROVEMENTS

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Eating a Mediterranean-type diet won’t suddenly and dramatically improve your cholesterol, magically slash your blood pressure, or help you drop 20 pounds overnight. But if you stick with it over time, it can potentially cut your risk of heart and blood vessel diseases by as much as 25%, accor...

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Bacteria keep us healthy but could they keep us young? BACTERIA KEEP US HEALTHY BUT COULD THEY KEEP US YOUNG?

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

A study in mice has indicated that the make-up of bacteria in the gut is linked with learning abilities and memory, providing a potential avenue of research into how to maintain cognitive functioning as we age. It’s part of a field of research looking at the link between gut bacteria and aging...

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Versatile Drug May Protect Baby From Hazards Of Intraamniotic Infections VERSATILE DRUG MAY PROTECT BABY FROM HAZARDS OF INTRAAMNIOTIC INFECTIONS

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Dangerous to both mom and baby, infections or inflammations of the tissue or fluids that surround the fetus often result in preterm delivery with a high risk of serious complications for the infant. A prescription drug used to treat conditions as varied as acetaminophen overdose and cystic fibrosis,...

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Could Omega-3 Fatty Acids Help Prevent Miscarriages? COULD OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS HELP PREVENT MISCARRIAGES?

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Compounds found in fish oil prevent pregnancy complications, including preterm birth, neonatal death, and stillbirth, in mice when the complications are caused by a common oral bacteria, according to research published today in the journal JCI Insight. The study, by scientists at Columbia University...

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Immunotherapy and DNA damage repair combo could target lung cancer IMMUNOTHERAPY AND DNA DAMAGE REPAIR COMBO COULD TARGET LUNG CANCER

blog article

Feb 18, 2019

Researchers have discovered that a combination of immune checkpoint blockade and targeted therapies that prevent DNA damage repair (DDR) resulted in significant tumor regression in mouse models of small cell lung cancer. Scientists have used the study results to suggest that the PARP inhibitor olapa...

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Diabetes and Alzheimer DIABETES AND ALZHEIMER'S: WHAT'S THE LINK?

blog article

Feb 17, 2019

New research has shown that impaired insulin signaling in the brain, often a feature of diabetes, may negatively impact cognition, mood, and metabolism all of which are common aspects of Alzheimer's disease. Although the conditions are seemingly independent of each other, earlier studies ha...

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Can these new compounds treat memory loss in depression? CAN THESE NEW COMPOUNDS TREAT MEMORY LOSS IN DEPRESSION?

blog article

Feb 16, 2019

Memory loss does not only occur in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia. It also happens with age, or in relation to mental health problems, such as depression. Now, researchers have developed new compounds that could reverse this cognitive effect. Memory loss is not solely a bedfellow of de...

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Frontal Lobe Paradox: Where People Have Brain Damage But Don FRONTAL LOBE PARADOX: WHERE PEOPLE HAVE BRAIN DAMAGE BUT DON'T KNOW IT

blog article

Feb 16, 2019

Humans have big brains and our frontal lobes, just behind the forehead, are particularly huge. Injuries to this part of the brain often happen after blows to the head or a stroke. Paradoxically, some people with frontal lobe injuries can seem unaffected until they’ve been carefully evaluated. ...

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Study finds new cognitive decline mechanism in Alzheimer STUDY FINDS NEW COGNITIVE DECLINE MECHANISM IN ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

People with Alzheimer's disease experience poor blood flow to the brain, which affects cognitive function. A new study conducted in a mouse model has finally uncovered the reason behind this reduced blood flow. For a while now, researchers have been aware that Alzheimer's disease goes h...

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How can estrogen help control type 2 diabetes? HOW CAN ESTROGEN HELP CONTROL TYPE 2 DIABETES?

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

New research finds that estrogen improves insulin sensitivity and details the mechanism behind this effect. The findings have a "profound impact on our understanding of obesity and diabetes, as well as potential dietary interventions," say the researchers. About 84 million people in t...

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Competition between different strains of malaria COMPETITION BETWEEN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF MALARIA

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

A recent study in Burkina Faso showed that genetic diversity in strains of malaria resulted in different degrees of disease severity and showed evidence of competition between strains. Of the five species of malaria parasites known to infect humans, Plasmodium falciparum is the most virulent, b...

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Patient Access – Pros and Cons to Improve your Healthcare Practice PATIENT ACCESS – PROS AND CONS TO IMPROVE YOUR HEALTHCARE PRACTICE

blog article

Feb 15, 2019

In the United States, we have certain expectations as consumers. We expect to shop around, read reviews, and select the best-performing and most cost-effective product. In essentially everything we want to buy, from a new television set to a vacation package, we can do this. There’s plenty of ...

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Breast pumps transmitting asthma-causing bacteria BREAST PUMPS TRANSMITTING ASTHMA-CAUSING BACTERIA

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

More often these days, mothers across the world use breast pumps to collect the milk in feeding bottle and feed their babies. A new study has revealed that these pumps may not be safe and may be contaminated with bacteria that can cause asthma in the babies later in life. The results of this study w...

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Developing a blood test for pain measurement DEVELOPING A BLOOD TEST FOR PAIN MEASUREMENT

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

Researchers have developed a blood test to measure pain. Scientists at Indiana University School of Medicine, and led by Professor Alexander Niculescu developed the breakthrough test. The team tracked hundreds of participants at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis to identify ...

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Diabetes: Human Cells Can Also Change Jobs DIABETES: HUMAN CELLS CAN ALSO CHANGE JOBS

blog article

Feb 14, 2019

Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation. By inducing non-insulin-producing human pancreatic cells to modify their function to produce insulin in a sustainable way, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerla...

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New drug shows promise against several aggressive cancers NEW DRUG SHOWS PROMISE AGAINST SEVERAL AGGRESSIVE CANCERS

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

A new phase I/II open-label, the dose-escalation trial has recently tested the effectiveness of a "Trojan horse" drug in treating multiple types of otherwise treatment-resistant cancer in its late stages. Recently, a team of experts from The Institute of Cancer Research in London and ...

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How sleep can boost your body HOW SLEEP CAN BOOST YOUR BODY'S IMMUNE RESPONSE

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

Researchers have demonstrated the importance of good-quality sleep time and time again, showing that a solid night's rest can contribute to many aspects of physical and mental well-being. One new study has explained how sleep contributes to the proper functioning of the immune system. Getti...

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PD-L1 assay specifically selects ideal patients for cancer treatment PD-L1 ASSAY SPECIFICALLY SELECTS IDEAL PATIENTS FOR CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

Immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab, have become important tools for managing non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Assessing the level of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expressed by a tumor can help clinicians determine how the patient should be treated. A re...

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Is Stem Cell Research Revolutionizing Modern Medicine? IS STEM CELL RESEARCH REVOLUTIONIZING MODERN MEDICINE?

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

Stem cell research has been a growing area of medicine for almost 40 years. In 1981, scientists discovered ways to derive embryonic stem cells from early mouse embryos, which led researchers to discover a method for doing so from human embryos in 1998. This allowed scientists to grow the cells in la...

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How Can Healthcare Address the Problem of Opioid Pain Management? HOW CAN HEALTHCARE ADDRESS THE PROBLEM OF OPIOID PAIN MANAGEMENT?

blog article

Feb 13, 2019

Opioids claimed over 64,000 lives in 2017 and data show an almost fourfold increase in overdose deaths from 1999 to 2008.[1] Yet, opioid medications are still necessary to manage the pain following surgery or injury. So how do we balance the need for pain management with the need to reduce addiction...

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Diagnostic technique reveals biomarker differentiating bladder cancer from inflammation DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUE REVEALS BIOMARKER DIFFERENTIATING BLADDER CANCER FROM INFLAMMATION

blog article

Feb 12, 2019

Label-free digital pathology using infrared (IR) imaging with subsequent proteomic analysis for bladder cancer (BC) has revealed the first protein biomarker (AHNAK2) for BC. AHNAK2 differentiates between chronic cystitis (inflammation of the bladder) and a non-muscle invasive-type BC (carcinoma in s...

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Protecting vision after optic nerve trauma using arginase 2 PROTECTING VISION AFTER OPTIC NERVE TRAUMA USING ARGINASE 2

blog article

Feb 11, 2019

Researchers have shown through mouse models of tough-to-treat optic nerve trauma, that removing the enzyme arginase 2, which increases with injury, decreases neuron death in the retina as well as the degeneration of nerve fibers that connect neurons to each other and ultimately the brain. “Rig...

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Can We Stem the Tide of Unsuccessful Drugs? CAN WE STEM THE TIDE OF UNSUCCESSFUL DRUGS?

blog article

Feb 11, 2019

While an increasing number of drugs is being developed, fewer of them are approved yearly by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), compared to the 1990s.1 As of today, it can cost up to $ 2.6 billion for a drug to be developed over an average of 10 years.2 Pharmaceutical companies are acknowled...

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The Bliss of Chocolate An Ayurvedic Perspective THE BLISS OF CHOCOLATE AN AYURVEDIC PERSPECTIVE

blog article

Feb 11, 2019

Theobroma cacao, the food of the gods, has been used as food, medicine, and even currency for thousands of years. In its pure form, raw cacao is an amazing source of antioxidants, protecting us from free radicals, helping to keep us vibrant and healthy. Antioxidants may act to counteract the effects...

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7 startling facts that will make you quit alcohol today 7 STARTLING FACTS THAT WILL MAKE YOU QUIT ALCOHOL TODAY

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

Since the dawn of civilization, man has found great fascination in concocting fermented beverages. Be it from grains or from ripe fruits alcohol-making appears in the earliest recorded documents, dating back to 7000 B.C. There are numerous reasons as to how this culture of alcohol consumption stood ...

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Protection against Mayaro virus using engineered DNA vaccine PROTECTION AGAINST MAYARO VIRUS USING ENGINEERED DNA VACCINE

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

A novel, synthetic DNA vaccine developed at The Wistar Institute induces protective immunity against Mayaro virus (MAYV), a mosquito-borne infection endemic to South America, that has the potential to become a global emerging viral threat. Since its discovery in 1954, MAYV infections have been confi...

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5 menstruation myths you must leave behind 5 MENSTRUATION MYTHS YOU MUST LEAVE BEHIND

blog article

Feb 08, 2019

Approximately half of the world's population experiences will experience, or has experienced menstruation, and yet myths about this biological process still abound. In this Spotlight feature, we debunk some of the most widespread menstruation misconceptions. As of 2017, the world's popu...

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Virtual drug discovery tackles unknown universe of drugs VIRTUAL DRUG DISCOVERY TACKLES UNKNOWN UNIVERSE OF DRUGS

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

Researchers have developed the world’s largest virtual pharmacology platform and have shown that it is capable of identifying extremely powerful drugs. The researchers mentioned that the platform, soon to contain over a billion virtual molecules never before synthesized and not found in nature...

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Ob–Gyns Do Too Much Fetal Monitoring OB–GYNS DO TOO MUCH FETAL MONITORING

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

For nearly three decades, I reminded every woman I saw in my family practice, from adolescence onward, to do a monthly self-breast examination (SBE). It made great sense in theory: the earlier you find a malignancy, the earlier you can treat it, and the better the outcome. But when researchers looke...

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6 Ways Clinicians Can Improve Medication Management for Seniors 6 WAYS CLINICIANS CAN IMPROVE MEDICATION MANAGEMENT FOR SENIORS

blog article

Feb 07, 2019

As people age, their risk of medication-related problems increases. As a Consumer Reports article notes, "When it comes to risks from prescription drugs, seniors face triple jeopardy." Older adults are more likely to take multiple medications. In fact, roughly half of adults 65 and ol...

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See-Through Fish Aid Scientists In Autism-Related Breakthrough SEE-THROUGH FISH AID SCIENTISTS IN AUTISM-RELATED BREAKTHROUGH

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

University of Miami researchers has discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish’s digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress. By replicating a mutation in ze...

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Treatment could prevents and treat Chlamydia TREATMENT COULD PREVENTS AND TREAT CHLAMYDIA

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Scientists have developed a method of treating and preventing Chlamydia one of the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections all over the world. Researchers at the University of Waterloo mentioned how this treatment differed from the traditional antibiotic treatment as it leans towards b...

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Overdose Deaths Could Increase With ‘Changing Nature’ Of Opioid Epidemic OVERDOSE DEATHS COULD INCREASE WITH ‘CHANGING NATURE’ OF OPIOID EPIDEMIC

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

The opioid epidemic in the United States could be responsible for 700,000 overdose deaths between 2016 and 2025, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open. “Preventing people from misusing prescription opioids is important and could help prevent some overdose deaths in the ...

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How to Get Fit Using Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) HOW TO GET FIT USING ELECTRICAL MUSCLE STIMULATION (EMS)

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS), also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or electromyo stimulation, is a protocol that elicits a muscle contraction using electrical impulses that directly stimulate your motor neurons. An EMS unit (like a Powerdot, Complex, Tone-A-Matic, or Marc...

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NSAID Pretreatment Impairs Immune Response In Heart Failure, Worsens Heart And Kidney Damage NSAID PRETREATMENT IMPAIRS IMMUNE RESPONSE IN HEART FAILURE, WORSENS HEART AND KIDNEY DAMAGE

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation. However, prolonged use raises the risk of heart and kidney failure events. A heart attack causes the death of heart muscle cells by lack of oxygen, and it also significantly inju...

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Fibromyalgia: Many may receive the wrong diagnosis FIBROMYALGIA: MANY MAY RECEIVE THE WRONG DIAGNOSIS

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that affects millions of people in the United States. However, the authors of a new study now warn that a significant number of people who have received a diagnosis may not, in reality, have this condition. People with fibromyalgia experience pain all over th...

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Immunosuppressants reduce artery plaque in people with psoriasis IMMUNOSUPPRESSANTS REDUCE ARTERY PLAQUE IN PEOPLE WITH PSORIASIS

blog article

Feb 06, 2019

New research finds that treatment with biologic drugs reduces coronary plaque buildup among people with severe psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 7.5 million people in the United States and approximately 125 million worldwide. Psoriasis is also the most ...

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A diet rich in fiber and vegetables can relieve depression A DIET RICH IN FIBER AND VEGETABLES CAN RELIEVE DEPRESSION

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

A healthful diet can "significantly reduce" symptoms of depression. That's the definitive conclusion from a meta-analysis of existing randomized, clinical trials. Researchers have long suspected that a poor diet can lead to poor mental health. Although the underpinnings of mental ...

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Rumors of Age Reversal: The Plasma Fraction Cure RUMORS OF AGE REVERSAL: THE PLASMA FRACTION CURE

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

I say “rumors” because there is no publication and results from just 6 rats, all of which were sacrificed for the sake of tissue biopsies.  Worse, we have no announcement of what the active agent(s) were that rejuvenated the rats, so discussion of mechanisms will have to wait. I&rsq...

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Sleep apnea may stop you from forming life memories SLEEP APNEA MAY STOP YOU FROM FORMING LIFE MEMORIES

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

New research suggests that obstructive sleep apnea may impair a person's ability to form meaningful memories about their personal life. Such dysfunction may, in turn, be a sign of depression, caution the researchers. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder that affects more than 1...

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Flaxseed fiber could help reduce obesity FLAXSEED FIBER COULD HELP REDUCE OBESITY

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

Flaxseed has many culinary uses, most commonly in granola and smoothies. It is a popular add-on in foods because research has suggested that it has many health benefits, including improving cholesterol. Now, a new study in an animal model shows how flaxseed can impact obesity markers. Flaxseeds...

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5 Qualities of Medication Management Systems for Providers 5 QUALITIES OF MEDICATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR PROVIDERS

blog article

Feb 05, 2019

Effective medication management is vital to achieving optimal outcomes. When providers can help their patients adhere to a medication regimen, risks such as adverse drug reactions, unnecessary admissions, illness, and even death are reduced and clinical goals are more likely to be achieved. Consider...

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Antitumor protein can sometimes promote cancer ANTITUMOR PROTEIN CAN SOMETIMES PROMOTE CANCER

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

A protein that plays a key role in protecting the body against cancer also appears to have the opposite effect in some cancers. New research from the University of California in San Diego demonstrates instances in which the tumor suppressor protein p53 can boost cancer metabolism. In a paper on the ...

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Fasting boosts metabolism and fights aging FASTING BOOSTS METABOLISM AND FIGHTS AGING

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

The latest study to explore the impact of fasting on the human body concludes that it increases metabolic activity more than previously realized and may even impart anti-aging benefits. Studies have shown that intermittent fasting can help certain people lose weight. Although researchers are still d...

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Hypertension: Home-based care may be the future HYPERTENSION: HOME-BASED CARE MAY BE THE FUTURE

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

Innovators and clinicians have developed and tested a new home-based care-delivery program. The new system helped 81 percent of study participants successfully control their blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the artery walls. Blood pressure rises and falls througho...

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‘Enhanced Recovery’ Protocol Reduces Opioid Use In Spinal Surgery Patients ‘ENHANCED RECOVERY’ PROTOCOL REDUCES OPIOID USE IN SPINAL SURGERY PATIENTS

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

A novel “Enhanced Recovery After Surgery” (ERAS) protocol developed by Penn Medicine for patients undergoing spinal and peripheral nerve surgery significantly reduced opioid use. A new study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that when an ERAS protocol was employed wh...

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Research Could Lead To Treatments For Muscle Wasting In Cancer Patients RESEARCH COULD LEAD TO TREATMENTS FOR MUSCLE WASTING IN CANCER PATIENTS

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

Researchers have found that evidence of cachexia, or muscle loss in cancer patients that can be life-threatening, emerges early in tumor development, a discovery that broadens understanding of the complicated effects of cancer on the body and advances their study of the condition to find ways to tre...

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Clusterin linked to both cardiac and metabolic diseases CLUSTERIN LINKED TO BOTH CARDIAC AND METABOLIC DISEASES

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

Scientists have linked the protein clusterin to a number of different cardiometabolic syndrome risks, by identifying its actions in the liver. Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Cancer Center spent nearly a decade ...

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Combination therapy may halt the progression of neuroblastoma in children COMBINATION THERAPY MAY HALT THE PROGRESSION OF NEUROBLASTOMA IN CHILDREN

blog article

Feb 04, 2019

The MYCN oncogene has long been known to be a key cause of a number of deadly solid tumor cancers, including neuroblastoma, which claims more lives of children under the age of 5 than any other cancer. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor found in young children. In up to 25 percent of cases...

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Are we facing a Parkinson ARE WE FACING A PARKINSON'S PANDEMIC?

blog article

Feb 03, 2019

According to one new study paper, the evidence is emerging that Parkinson's disease is becoming a pandemic. The authors discuss their concerns and the challenges ahead. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition. Primarily affecting the motor regions of the central nervous system, ...

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How can the development of brain stem cells into neurons cause cancer? HOW CAN THE DEVELOPMENT OF BRAIN STEM CELLS INTO NEURONS CAUSE CANCER?

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Scientists have identified how brain stem cells could cause brain cancer instead of developing into neurons. Researchers at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) followed stem cells along the path of development towards becoming neurons. The team analyzed each step where genes were switched on an...

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Flu-like illness raises the risk of stroke FLU-LIKE ILLNESS RAISES THE RISK OF STROKE

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Two new research studies show that the chance of experiencing a stroke is significantly higher after flu or flu-like illness. Each year, nearly 800,000 people in the United States experience a stroke. The risk factors include weight, smoking status, age, and family history of stroke. However, flu an...

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Medical cannabis relieves symptoms in children with autism MEDICAL CANNABIS RELIEVES SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

In a new study of patients with autism who are 18 years old and under, researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Soroka University Medical Center report that cannabis as a treatment for autism spectrum disorders appears to be a well-tolerated, safe and effective option to relieve...

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Certain E-cigarette Flavoring Chemicals Could Impair Lung Function CERTAIN E-CIGARETTE FLAVORING CHEMICALS COULD IMPAIR LUNG FUNCTION

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Electronic cigarettes or “e-cigarettes” are devices that vaporize a liquid solution which can then be inhaled by the user, delivering a dose of nicotine. E-cigarettes have gained significant popularity as an alternative to conventional cigarettes, which is reflected by the vast number of...

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Females Find Social Interactions To Be More Rewarding Than Males FEMALES FIND SOCIAL INTERACTIONS TO BE MORE REWARDING THAN MALES

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Females find same-sex social interactions to be more rewarding than males, and females are more sensitive to the rewarding actions of oxytocin (OT) than males, according to a research study that used Syrian hamsters to investigate the brain mechanisms that determine the rewarding properties of socia...

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Pinpointing the Cells That Control the Brain’s Memory Flow PINPOINTING THE CELLS THAT CONTROL THE BRAIN’S MEMORY FLOW

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

From the cab driver heading for Times Square to the commuter returning home on the freeway, we all carry maps in our head labeled with important locations. And a new Columbia study in mice shows that, by directing the delicate ebb-and-flow of brain activity, a small cluster of cells helps the brain&...

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Albendazole for lymphatic filariasis… direct hit or misfire? ALBENDAZOLE FOR LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS… DIRECT HIT OR MISFIRE?

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

For two decades albendazole has been donated for lymphatic filariasis mass treatment programs. An updated Cochrane Review investigates the effectiveness of albendazole for lymphatic filariasis. Lymphatic filariasis, a disease common in tropical and subtropical areas, is spread by mosquitoes and...

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Can We Treat Mood Disorders With Pharmacological Therapeutics? CAN WE TREAT MOOD DISORDERS WITH PHARMACOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS?

blog article

Feb 01, 2019

Clinical treatments for neurological and mood disorders like anxiety disorder (SAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) have failed to show consistent efficacy in treating patients. VistaGen Therapeutics is aiming to correct that. VistaGen’s compound AV-101, an NMDA receptor antagonist, is cur...

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Fathers Are Happier Parents Than Mothers, New Study Shows FATHERS ARE HAPPIER PARENTS THAN MOTHERS, NEW STUDY SHOWS

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

A study of 18,000 people shows that fathers experience more well-being from parenthood than mothers. Past studies have considered whether people with children have greater well-being than people without children. They do. But few have considered the relative happiness of fathers and mothers.

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BDNF–VEGF interplay key to rapid antidepressant actions BDNF–VEGF INTERPLAY KEY TO RAPID ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

A study reveals a complex interplay of two different growth factors in the rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine. The study reports that the antidepressant-like actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) require the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). &...

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Dementia: The worrying DEMENTIA: THE WORRYING 'RISE OF PSEUDOMEDICINE'

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

An article, published in JAMA Network this month, attacks what it refers to as pseudomedicine. In particular, the authors are concerned that individuals with dementia and their families are being targeted. Dementia is becoming increasingly prevalent as the population of the United States ages. Curre...

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Schizophrenia: Restoring brain circuitry to improve symptoms SCHIZOPHRENIA: RESTORING BRAIN CIRCUITRY TO IMPROVE SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 31, 2019

Researchers pin down the faulty brain circuitry that drives negative symptom severity in schizophrenia and looks at noninvasive methods of targeting and "repairing" this breakdown. Schizophrenia is a mental health condition with characteristic symptoms that include delusions and hallu...

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Hearing loss and cognitive decline: Study probes link HEARING LOSS AND COGNITIVE DECLINE: STUDY PROBES LINK

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Recent research adds to a growing body of knowledge that links hearing loss with cognitive decline, which is a hallmark of dementia and often precedes the disease. After analyzing 8 years of data from a health study of more than 10,000 men, scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Har...

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Are tattoos linked to poor health and risky behavior? ARE TATTOOS LINKED TO POOR HEALTH AND RISKY BEHAVIOR?

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Tattoos have grown in popularity dramatically over recent decades. A new survey-based study investigates whether they have any associations with risky behavior or adverse health outcomes. In 2003, just 16 percent of people in the United States had a tattoo. By 2015, that figure had increased to 29 p...

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Expanding pill could monitor the stomach for up to a month EXPANDING PILL COULD MONITOR THE STOMACH FOR UP TO A MONTH

blog article

Jan 30, 2019

Engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an ingestible, jelly-like tablet that expands to the size of a ping-pong ball upon reaching the stomach. This way it is big enough to stay in the stomach for a longer period of time. The inflatable pill is embedded with a sensor...

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A new cure for river blindness and elephantiasis A NEW CURE FOR RIVER BLINDNESS AND ELEPHANTIASIS

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) are neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that cause severe disability and affect more than 106 million people, according to the latest reports from WHO. These two NTDs are caused by parasitic roundworms, the filarial nematodes O...

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We Need to Talk about Intestinal Worms WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT INTESTINAL WORMS

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

In 1909, John D. Rockefeller, Sr., deeded 72,000 shares of the Standard Oil Company to establish a foundation dedicated to the promotion of health and the reduction of disease. Hookworm, then rampant throughout the U.S. South, was the Rockefeller Foundation’s first undertaking. The parasite la...

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Vaccinating Mice May Finally Slow Lyme Disease VACCINATING MICE MAY FINALLY SLOW LYME DISEASE

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Kirby Stafford, Connecticut’s state entomologist, knows only one surefire way to reduce tick populations enough to cut Lyme disease rates: killing deer. Otherwise, he says, “very little by itself really reduces tick numbers enough.” But in some Connecticut neighborhoods, Stafford h...

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Drug compound could be next-generation treatment for aggressive form of AML DRUG COMPOUND COULD BE NEXT-GENERATION TREATMENT FOR AGGRESSIVE FORM OF AML

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

Purdue University researchers are developing a series of drug compounds that have shown promise in treating the recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). About 30 percent of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients have a mutation caused by a kinase called FLT3, which makes leukemia more aggressive. ...

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What’s A Dosha? Ayurvedic Dosha Types Explained WHAT’S A DOSHA? AYURVEDIC DOSHA TYPES EXPLAINED

blog article

Jan 29, 2019

In Ayurvedic medicine, doshas are innate, bodily humor of which every individual is formed. The body constitution is based on three doshas: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. These innate energies circulate in the body and are responsible for several physicals, mental and emotional characteristics. Every indiv...

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Sitopaladi Benefits, Ingredients, Dosage, Side Effects SITOPALADI BENEFITS, INGREDIENTS, DOSAGE, SIDE EFFECTS

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Sitopaladi is an important Ayurvedic herbal formula. It is popular worldwide due to its various health benefits, including cold, cough and chronic respiratory problems. How should it be taken? Keep reading to learn sitopaladi dosage, sitopaladi side effects, sitopaladi ingredients and more. The...

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Influenza Drug Platform Could Yield Candidates for Multiple Pathogens INFLUENZA DRUG PLATFORM COULD YIELD CANDIDATES FOR MULTIPLE PATHOGENS

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Scientists at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) and Imperial College London have designed a new type of drug against influenza that targets the flu virus’ ability to gain entry into its host’s cells. The new technology, reported in the Journal of Immunology, effectively en...

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Unprecedented look into capillaries using new technology UNPRECEDENTED LOOK INTO CAPILLARIES USING NEW TECHNOLOGY

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

More than 40 billion capillaries – tiny, hair-like blood vessels – are tasked with carrying oxygen and nutrients to the far reaches of the human body. But despite their sheer number and monumental importance to basic functions and metabolism, not much is known about their inner workings....

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Chicken eggs containing human proteins could be key for future therapies CHICKEN EGGS CONTAINING HUMAN PROTEINS COULD BE KEY FOR FUTURE THERAPIES

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

Genetically modified chickens could produce human proteins in their eggs, offering a cost-effective method of producing certain drugs. Researchers at University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute and Roslin Technologies initially focused on the production of high-quality proteins so they could be...

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Defeat cravings for unhealthful food in 2 minutes DEFEAT CRAVINGS FOR UNHEALTHFUL FOOD IN 2 MINUTES

blog article

Jan 28, 2019

The modern world can seem saturated with unhealthful food options. It can be a challenge to make positive dietary choices. A new study finds an intriguingly simple way to combat cravings for unhealthful foods. Researchers from the marketing department at the University of South Florida in Tampa...

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Diabetes: How optimism may influence your risk DIABETES: HOW OPTIMISM MAY INFLUENCE YOUR RISK

blog article

Jan 27, 2019

New research suggests that optimism may have a protective effect against type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. A range of factors can raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Some of these factors such as diet, physical activity, and weight can be modified. Others, including ethnicity, genes...

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Chinese fir tree compound may help to combat cancer CHINESE FIR TREE COMPOUND MAY HELP TO COMBAT CANCER

blog article

Jan 27, 2019

New research finds that a structural analog of a compound found in an endangered Chinese fir tree has cancer-fighting properties when combined with an existing cancer drug. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimates that doctors diagnosed well over 1,700,00 new cases of cancer in 2018, and m...

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How High Blood Pressure Might Contribute To Alzheimer’s HOW HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MIGHT CONTRIBUTE TO ALZHEIMER’S

blog article

Jan 26, 2019

The brain’s system for removing waste is driven primarily by the pulsations of adjoining arteries, University of Rochester neuroscientists and mechanical engineers report in a new study. They also show that changes in the pulsations caused by high blood pressure slow the removal of waste, redu...

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How gum disease could lead to Alzheimer HOW GUM DISEASE COULD LEAD TO ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Jan 26, 2019

 In a new study, researchers have found that a bacterium largely responsible for gum disease also contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease. According to data from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 8.52 percent of adults between 20 and 64 years of ...

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Mavoglurant could improve eye gaze in fragile X patients MAVOGLURANT COULD IMPROVE EYE GAZE IN FRAGILE X PATIENTS

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Researchers have found that an experimental drug, mavoglurant, could be used to modify a key characteristic in individuals with fragile X syndrome. A team at Rush University Medical Center and the MIND Institute at UC Davis found that the mGluR5 negative modulator could help target gaze avoidance, i...

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New drug targets for BRCA-driven cancer uncovered NEW DRUG TARGETS FOR BRCA-DRIVEN CANCER UNCOVERED

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

BRCA1 and BRCA2 are critical tumor suppressor genes–women carrying a mutation in one of these genes have up to an 80 percent risk of developing breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of developing ovarian cancer. Cancer drugs known as Parp inhibitors have recently been approved for treating patie...

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Overcoming the Identification Bottleneck in Untargeted Metabolomics: Combining Technological and Software Innovations OVERCOMING THE IDENTIFICATION BOTTLENECK IN UNTARGETED METABOLOMICS: COMBINING TECHNOLOGICAL AND SOFTWARE INNOVATIONS

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Metabolomics, a rapidly evolving field that examines the profile and concentration of the small molecule constituents of cellular processes, has the potential to drive significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. Being effectively downstream of other 'omics' app...

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The viral content of human genomes is more variable than we thought THE VIRAL CONTENT OF HUMAN GENOMES IS MORE VARIABLE THAN WE THOUGHT

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Parts of human DNA are of viral origin: many of them were inserted into the primordial genetic material of our ancestors many millions of years ago and have been inherited by successive generations ever since. Thus, they are not thought to vary much in the genomes of modern humans. Human endogenous ...

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Licensing Deal Moves Merck KGaA, Vertex Further into Gene Editing-Based Drug Development LICENSING DEAL MOVES MERCK KGAA, VERTEX FURTHER INTO GENE EDITING-BASED DRUG DEVELOPMENT

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

Merck KGaA has advanced further into gene editing-based drug development with its deal this week that out licenses to Vertex Pharmaceuticals a pair of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitors one clinical, the other preclinical for use in gene editing applications in six genetic disease indi...

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UK Lung Cancer Diagnostic Services: Time to Step Up UK LUNG CANCER DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES: TIME TO STEP UP

blog article

Jan 25, 2019

The UK’s national health system needs to take a hard look at their priorities and procedures to ensure that rapid advances in molecular diagnostics in lung cancer are translated into a practical service for all patients, according to a report launched today at the British Thoracic Oncology Gro...

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4 Ways Technology Developed in Hospitals is Supporting Medical Advances 4 WAYS TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED IN HOSPITALS IS SUPPORTING MEDICAL ADVANCES

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

Advances in healthcare technology are allowing hospitals to deliver safer, more effective and higher quality care to patients. In fact, one could say that technology is helping take medicine to places no one has gone before.  As Marc Siegel, MD, a professor of medicine and medical director of D...

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Melanoma mortality rates vary across the country MELANOMA MORTALITY RATES VARY ACROSS THE COUNTRY

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

People with melanoma who live in states with the highest number of melanoma diagnoses tend to have better survival rates, according to recent research that examined data on a state-by-state basis. Researchers from the University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City set out to determine if there wer...

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Are We Innately Immune to Cancer? ARE WE INNATELY IMMUNE TO CANCER?

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

The study of cancer immunity has been a global challenge since William Coley first treated patients with his eponymous toxin in the late 19th century. As our understanding of the immune system has evolved, its role in the fight against cancer has become increasingly apparent. There have been some mo...

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Bacterial pathogens found in brains of Alzheimer’s patients BACTERIAL PATHOGENS FOUND IN BRAINS OF ALZHEIMER’S PATIENTS

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

A bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis, ordinarily associated with chronic gum disease, has been shown to drive Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Researchers at the University of Louisville detailed in their study how P. gingivalis was observed, with Dr Jan Potempa at the Department of Oral Immuno...

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Scientists find a cellular process that stops cancer before it starts SCIENTISTS FIND A CELLULAR PROCESS THAT STOPS CANCER BEFORE IT STARTS

blog article

Jan 24, 2019

Salk Institute scientists studying the relationship of telomeres to cancer made a surprising discovery: a cellular recycling process called autophagy–generally thought of as a survival mechanism–actually promotes the death of cells, thereby preventing cancer initiation. The work reveals ...

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Genetic study reveals possible new routes to treating osteoarthritis GENETIC STUDY REVEALS POSSIBLE NEW ROUTES TO TREATING OSTEOARTHRITIS

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

In the largest genetic study of osteoarthritis to date, scientists have uncovered 52 new genetic changes linked to the disease, which doubles the number of genetic regions associated with the disabling condition. Scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK, and their collaborators analyzed the ...

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Pushing the immune system to eat cancer PUSHING THE IMMUNE SYSTEM TO EAT CANCER

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

Researchers have managed to find a way to fuel macrophages with the energy needed to attack and eat cancer cells. Macrophages are immune cells that engulf foreign objects and destroy them, and as such are supposed to ‘serve and protect’. However, cancer has managed to find a way around t...

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Oolong tea extract may stave off breast cancer OOLONG TEA EXTRACT MAY STAVE OFF BREAST CANCER

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

New research finds that oolong tea can damage breast cancer cells and that people who consume large amounts of this tea have a lower risk of developing breast cancer. Despite recent advances in screening procedures and treatment, breast cancer remains both the most common form of this disease a...

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How your flu medicine can affect your heart HOW YOUR FLU MEDICINE CAN AFFECT YOUR HEART

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

January is at the heart of the cold and flu season, and whenever the sneezing and coughing hits, we tend to stock up on anti-inflammatories and decongestants to help us fight these symptoms. However, the American Heart Association warned that these drugs can have unwanted effects on the heart. ...

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The FDA’s Response to an Increase in the Development of Gene and Cell Therapies THE FDA’S RESPONSE TO AN INCREASE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GENE AND CELL THERAPIES

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

In the last two decades, our understanding of the mechanisms behind human disease paired with significant innovation in complementary technologies has empowered our industry to develop treatments for a wide variety of previously untreatable conditions. Two such treatment categories are cell and gene...

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S: COULD TARGETING THIS MECHANISM REVERSE MEMORY DECLINE?

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

A novel genetic approach that repairs broken connections between brain cells could lead to treatments that restore memory capacity in Alzheimer's disease. The new approach reverses changes to gene expression that tend to occur in the later stages of the disease. Scientists at State University of...

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Skin test detects prion infection before symptoms appear SKIN TEST DETECTS PRION INFECTION BEFORE SYMPTOMS APPEAR

blog article

Jan 23, 2019

An international team of researchers successfully have used two methods to detect prions in skin samples collected from inoculated rodents. Prions are able to infect both animals and humans, and often go undetected as they destroy brain tissue, causing memory loss, mobility issues, and ultimately de...

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ROCKbusting Huntington’s and Probing Parkinson’s ROCKBUSTING HUNTINGTON’S AND PROBING PARKINSON’S

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

At the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) conference last held in November 2018 in San Diego, a truly frightening number of posters were presented over nine sessions. The summary document for one of these sessions is 1400 pages long. Whilst attempting to explore all these posters before Neuroscience 201...

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S BLOOD TEST DETECTS BRAIN DAMAGE YEARS BEFORE SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

A blood test for a protein could identify people in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease a decade or more before symptoms, such as a decline in memory and thinking, emerge. This was what an international group of scientists concluded after evaluating the simple test that used blood sampl...

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How your immune system uses chaos to prevent disease HOW YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM USES CHAOS TO PREVENT DISEASE

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

New research, appearing in the journal Nature Communications, reveals a new mechanism that is at play in cellular function. Chaotic swings of protein concentrations help keep our immune system alert and functional, preventing chronic diseases, such as cancer and diabetes. Modern research has un...

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Targeted oral treatments for severe asthma TARGETED ORAL TREATMENTS FOR SEVERE ASTHMA

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

Researchers in Leicester is leading a study to investigate the use of antibiotics in the treatment of cancer. The researchers in this project, funded by a collaboration between the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and Medical Research Council (MRC), are also working with Asthma UK. Arou...

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Neurofilament light chain detects Alzheimer’s damage before symptoms NEUROFILAMENT LIGHT CHAIN DETECTS ALZHEIMER’S DAMAGE BEFORE SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 22, 2019

A simple blood test reliably detects signs of brain damage in people on the path to developing Alzheimer’s disease – even before they show signs of confusion and memory loss, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neu...

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Drinking soda after exercise could damage kidneys DRINKING SODA AFTER EXERCISE COULD DAMAGE KIDNEYS

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Downing a cool soft drink after a hot workout can feel refreshing. However, according to the latest research, it may cause further dehydration and interfere with kidney function. Caffeinated soft drinks that are high in fructose are hugely popular worldwide. They need no introduction. The ...

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Leaky blood vessels may trigger Alzheimer LEAKY BLOOD VESSELS MAY TRIGGER ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Recent research reveals that leaky capillaries in the brain could have a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Dementia, the main type of which is Alzheimer's disease, affects about 50 million people worldwide. According to the Alzheimer's Association, over 5 million people in ...

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Making The Transition To Digital Pathology MAKING THE TRANSITION TO DIGITAL PATHOLOGY

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

In the second part of this blog series, the discussion looked at the key blockers standing in the way of the adoption of digital pathology. Here, our experts discussed the advice they’d give those just starting out on the journey to digital. If you weren’t able to make the panel discussi...

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Deciphering RNA to Predict if a Patient Will Respond to a Targeted Drug DECIPHERING RNA TO PREDICT IF A PATIENT WILL RESPOND TO A TARGETED DRUG

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Ineffective drugs have a profound impact on patients. First of all, the patient could be taking a medication that not only doesn't make them feel better but could also result in unwanted adverse effects. Establishing a way to ensure patients are prescribed optimal treatment from day one while av...

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Cancer Survivors Face Significant Hardships Related To Medical Bills CANCER SURVIVORS FACE SIGNIFICANT HARDSHIPS RELATED TO MEDICAL BILLS

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

New research indicates that cancer survivors carry greater financial burdens related to medical debt payments and bills compared with individuals without a cancer history, with the greatest hardships in younger survivors. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Canc...

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How Staying In Shape Is Vital For Reproductive Success HOW STAYING IN SHAPE IS VITAL FOR REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Cells must keep their shape and proportions to successfully reproduce through cell division, finds new research from the Francis Crick Institute and King’s College London. The research, published in Nature Communications, reveals a fundamental biological basis for scaling, where cells maintain...

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Is Veganism actually healthier? IS VEGANISM ACTUALLY HEALTHIER?

blog article

Jan 21, 2019

Veganuary is in full swing. This year, 6% of people in the UK will attempt to avoid meat and resist dairy for one whole month. It is thought more than half will adopt their new, fashionable lifestyle on a more permanent basis, continuing to abstain from an animal-based diet beyond January. Some will...

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Combination Therapeutic Effective for Leishmaniasis and HIV Patients COMBINATION THERAPEUTIC EFFECTIVE FOR LEISHMANIASIS AND HIV PATIENTS

blog article

Jan 20, 2019

In a study published in PLOS Neglected Diseases, special combination therapy has been proven for efficacy in cases of coinfection with Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). As of now, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends AmBisome monotherapy for treatment, how...

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Central obesity linked to brain shrinkage CENTRAL OBESITY LINKED TO BRAIN SHRINKAGE

blog article

Jan 20, 2019

Being overweight can lead to several health problems. Scientists now believe that obesity in the stomach area could even have associations with smaller brain size. Researchers already know that the size of the brain can determine its health and function. However, they know much less about what affec...

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Key brain area plays a crucial role in addiction KEY BRAIN AREA PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN ADDICTION

blog article

Jan 19, 2019

New research finds that the cerebellum, a large part of the human brain that scientists thought was primarily involved in motor control, may play a key role in reward-seeking and social behaviors. The findings may help inform future therapies for treating addiction. Recent research has hinted a...

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What role does the immune system play in hypertension? WHAT ROLE DOES THE IMMUNE SYSTEM PLAY IN HYPERTENSION?

blog article

Jan 19, 2019

Millions of people in the United States and across the world have hypertension, a condition that, without proper management, can contribute to the risk of heart disease and stroke. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that approximately 75 million adults in the U.S...

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Multiple sclerosis: Small molecule could delay onset MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: SMALL MOLECULE COULD DELAY ONSET

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Treatment with a small molecule could delay the damage that multiple sclerosis inflicts in the brain and other parts of the central nervous system, say, scientists. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disabling disease that destroys the myelin sheath that protects nerve fibers, causing loss of signaling an...

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Scientists Create A Renewable Source Of Cancer-Fighting T Cells SCIENTISTS CREATE A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF CANCER-FIGHTING T CELLS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells. The technique uses structures cal...

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What is an obsessive-compulsive disorder? WHAT IS AN OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER?

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition characterized by distressing, intrusive, obsessive thoughts and repetitive, compulsive physical or mental acts. It is a distinct condition but falls within the category of "obsessive-compulsive and related disorders." The American Psychiatri...

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How trypanosomes spread the news HOW TRYPANOSOMES SPREAD THE NEWS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa but probably their more critical impact is through the disease they cause in the livestock of farmers and smallholders. Here, the economic losses of disease and the cost of prophylactic drugs to control the impact of the diseas...

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Flossing could increase exposure to toxic chemicals FLOSSING COULD INCREASE EXPOSURE TO TOXIC CHEMICALS

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Eating takeout and flossing the teeth are routine tasks for many people. However, a new study has found that they could be exposing people to potentially dangerous chemicals. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have become a daily part of human life. These water- and greaseproof substances ar...

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Researchers Discover Synaptic Logic For Connections Between Two Brain Hemispheres RESEARCHERS DISCOVER SYNAPTIC LOGIC FOR CONNECTIONS BETWEEN TWO BRAIN HEMISPHERES

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience have developed a new combination of technologies that allow them to identify the functional properties of individual synapses that link the two hemispheres and determine how they are arranged within a neuron’s dendritic field.

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Big Data Analysis Approaches for Drug Discovery BIG DATA ANALYSIS APPROACHES FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

Big data has long been a buzzword in drug discovery, but as analysis methods become more sophisticated, its potential is beginning to be realized. We look at some of the latest advances in big data analysis for drug discovery. Dr. Anne Carpenter’s lab at the Broad Institute is dedicated to mak...

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Why We Use Food as an Energetic Buffer WHY WE USE FOOD AS AN ENERGETIC BUFFER

blog article

Jan 18, 2019

For as long as I can remember, my relationship with food has been complicated. On the one hand, I was super health conscious at an unusually young age fascinated by all the different schools of thought that were emerging about how best to eat for optimal health. On the other hand, I was also quite y...

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Insomnia breakthrough: Scientists identify 5 types INSOMNIA BREAKTHROUGH: SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY 5 TYPES

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

There are five types of insomnia, each with its own distinct features, according to a recent study. Scientists at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience studied thousands of people who had voluntarily signed up to an online sleep registry. They concluded that insomnia has five subtypes that diff...

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Scientists developed a new mouse model of Hirschsprung’s disease SCIENTISTS DEVELOPED A NEW MOUSE MODEL OF HIRSCHSPRUNG’S DISEASE

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Researchers have developed the first viable mouse model of Hirschsprung’s disease and associated enterocolitis with a defect in GDNF/GFRa1/RET signaling…About one in every 5,000 babies is born without enteric neurons in distal colon resulting in Hirschsprung’s disease. Because of ...

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GREB1 gene potential drug target for prostate cancer treatment GREB1 GENE POTENTIAL DRUG TARGET FOR PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Researchers in the US have discovered how a gene involved in regulating hormone receptors, GREB1, may contribute to drug resistance in some prostate cancer patients. The scientists’ findings suggest that disrupting the specific activity of the GREB1 gene could be explored for developing m...

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Tuberculosis Tests are Inadequate, Better Options Identified TUBERCULOSIS TESTS ARE INADEQUATE, BETTER OPTIONS IDENTIFIED

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found. In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not...

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A Bone a Day Keeps the Doctor Away? A BONE A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY?

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that may have health benefits, although more research is needed to validate these claims. ...

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Experimental drug may prevent Alzheimer EXPERIMENTAL DRUG MAY PREVENT ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

A drug that scientists are currently developing to treat stroke survivors might also help stave off Alzheimer's disease. According to the Alzheimer's Association, 5.7 million people in the United States are living with the condition. Current medications can only relieve some symptoms of the ...

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Breast Cancer Survivors Report Improvements in Side Effects After Acupressure BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS REPORT IMPROVEMENTS IN SIDE EFFECTS AFTER ACUPRESSURE

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

Researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center reported in 2016 that acupressure helped reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors. In the new study, they looked at the impact of acupressure on symptoms that frequently accompany fatigue in this population: chronic pain, anxiety, depr...

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Detecting Urinary Tract Infections Sooner to Avoid Hospital Trips DETECTING URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS SOONER TO AVOID HOSPITAL TRIPS

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

UTI is an infection of any part of the urinary system, from the kidneys to the bladder. The symptoms include pain in the lower part of the stomach, blood in urine, needing to urinate suddenly or more often than usual, and changes in mood and behavior. In a paper published in PLOS One, scientists fro...

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ADM-RAMP2 system could be therapeutic target for retinal vein occlusion ADM-RAMP2 SYSTEM COULD BE THERAPEUTIC TARGET FOR RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

blog article

Jan 17, 2019

A model of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in mice that mimics the clinical features of CRVO in humans was used to study the pathologic effects of retinol occlusion and demonstrate the retinoprotective effects of the peptide adrenomedullin (ADM) and the protein RAMP2. “CRVO is the second...

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7 simple steps for heart health also prevent diabetes 7 SIMPLE STEPS FOR HEART HEALTH ALSO PREVENT DIABETES

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

New research suggests that following the American Heart Association's guidelines for maintaining heart health can also drastically reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), there are seven cardiovascular risk factors that people can ch...

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How a dog can make it easier to manage diabetes HOW A DOG CAN MAKE IT EASIER TO MANAGE DIABETES

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

Dogs can be great friends they will offer unconditional love, joy, and company. But they can also support your health and well-being in other, more specific ways. Fresh evidence now suggests that dogs could help people with type 1 diabetes manage their condition with extra confidence.

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13 Sureshot Home Remedies to Lower High Blood Pressure 13 SURESHOT HOME REMEDIES TO LOWER HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

If you think frequent headaches, anxiety, shortness of breath or feeling dizzy are common symptoms of high blood pressure or hypertension, then you are wrong. Hypertension is basically a symptomless condition. This factor makes it quite dangerous to rely only on the symptomatic diagnosis of high blo...

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A potential therapeutic target for ALS revealed A POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGET FOR ALS REVEALED

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

Stem cell scientists have investigated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), identifying a potential new therapeutic target. A team of researchers, led by scientists at Harvard University, identified STMN2 as the biomarker and possible drug target for the neurological disease that is currently extrem...

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New intelligent systems predict behavior to improve accessibility in persons with disabilities NEW INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS PREDICT BEHAVIOR TO IMPROVE ACCESSIBILITY IN PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

Performing activities of daily life are something most people take for granted, but there are those who need assistance with those tasks. A recent study published in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation utilized an intelligent system to speed up the control of Environment Control Inter...

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Lower Back Pain: Ayurvedic Remedies, Causes + Treatment LOWER BACK PAIN: AYURVEDIC REMEDIES, CAUSES + TREATMENT

blog article

Jan 16, 2019

Lower back pain is not a disease in itself. It’s a symptom which arises from incorrect use of the body or from an underlying disease. Low back pain is the most common health complaint in 35-50-year-olds in both men and women. Above 50, it is associated with several other diseases. It is usuall...

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Engineered T-cells promote acceptance of organs after transplant ENGINEERED T-CELLS PROMOTE ACCEPTANCE OF ORGANS AFTER TRANSPLANT

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

The rejection of organs after a transplant is a major problem, and suppressing the immune system to prevent the rejection of the organ can lead to life-threatening infections. A team of researchers at the University of Basel have developed an approach that could prevent the rejection of transplanted...

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Producing vaccines without the use of chemicals PRODUCING VACCINES WITHOUT THE USE OF CHEMICALS

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

Innovative new technology will use electron beams to produce inactivated vaccines quickly, reproducibly and without the use of chemicals. Producing vaccines is a tricky task especially in the case of inactivated vaccines, in which pathogens must be killed without altering their structure. Until now,...

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Hyperpigmentation Causes, Management + Ayurvedic Home Remedies HYPERPIGMENTATION CAUSES, MANAGEMENT + AYURVEDIC HOME REMEDIES

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

Hyperpigmentation is a common skin condition. Some parts of the skin become darker compared to the immediate surrounding skin. Hyperpigmentation causes are diverse. Topical management is available but tries also the Ayurvedic home remedies for hyperpigmentation. When melanin production increase...

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Exercise can halve heart attack risk in healthy people EXERCISE CAN HALVE HEART ATTACK RISK IN HEALTHY PEOPLE

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

New research, appearing in the European Heart Journal, suggests that lack of physical activity can drastically increase the risk of a heart attack in the long-term, even if there are no symptoms at present. Cardiorespiratory fitness describes the body's ability to deliver oxygen to the musc...

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A good night A GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP COULD LOWER CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

Can the duration and quality of your sleep affect your cardiovascular health? A new study suggests there is a connection between how much sleep you get each night and how well you sleep and the risk of cardiovascular problems. Many studies have emphasized the importance of sleep in maintaining ...

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Innovative skin patch may offer long-term contraception INNOVATIVE SKIN PATCH MAY OFFER LONG-TERM CONTRACEPTION

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

Researchers have devised a new technology that may soon enable women to "self-administer long-acting contraceptives" in a matter of seconds. More than 60 percent of women of reproductive age in the United States are using contraception, according to the latest estimates from the Cente...

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Screen Time Affects Adolescent Wellbeing (but Only 0.4% of It) SCREEN TIME AFFECTS ADOLESCENT WELLBEING (BUT ONLY 0.4% OF IT)

blog article

Jan 15, 2019

Researchers at the University of Oxford have performed the most definitive study to date on the relationship between technology use and adolescent mental health, examining data from over 300,000 teenagers and parents in the UK and USA. At most, only 0.4% of adolescent wellbeing is related to screen ...

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A lack of deep sleep could indicate Alzheimer A LACK OF DEEP SLEEP COULD INDICATE ALZHEIMER'S DEVELOPMENT

blog article

Jan 14, 2019

A recent study suggests that a warning sign may come before any symptoms of Alzheimer's disease: Adults who do not get enough deep sleep may be on their way to developing the disease. Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, found that older people who...

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6 Immune Boosters to Keep You Healthy Through the Holidays 6 IMMUNE BOOSTERS TO KEEP YOU HEALTHY THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS

blog article

Jan 14, 2019

’Tis the season—the season for joy, celebration, family, friends, lights, gifts, and yes—challenges to our health. While the holiday season is rich in activities, the hustle and bustle can leave the immune system compromised. The most effective way to protect your immune system thi...

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Could pomegranates offer the key to new IBD treatments? COULD POMEGRANATES OFFER THE KEY TO NEW IBD TREATMENTS?

blog article

Jan 13, 2019

Studies of pomegranates, "the fruit of the gods, "is increasingly revealing why they are so beneficial. Urolithin A, derived from pomegranates, and its synthetic equivalent could help treat inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study. The Centers for Disease Control and Preve...

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Personal income may increase risk of heart disease PERSONAL INCOME MAY INCREASE RISK OF HEART DISEASE

blog article

Jan 13, 2019

Income levels, if they are unstable, can easily turn into a stressor. However, the volatility of personal income could be having a more serious effect on people's heart health. It is often expected that a person's income will constantly rise until they reach retirement age. However, this isn...

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Common pain relievers may worsen C. difficile infection COMMON PAIN RELIEVERS MAY WORSEN C. DIFFICILE INFECTION

blog article

Jan 12, 2019

A study finds that certain pain relievers may promote Clostridium difficile infection. The results may help improve the management of the condition and its symptoms. Clostridium difficile also called C. difficile or C. diff is a bacterium that causes inflammation of the colon. This health condition ...

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Osteoporosis breakthrough: Bone mass increased by 800 percent OSTEOPOROSIS BREAKTHROUGH: BONE MASS INCREASED BY 800 PERCENT

blog article

Jan 12, 2019

A groundbreaking set of studies has found that blocking certain receptors in the brain leads to the growth of remarkably strong bones. Could a new osteoporosis treatment be on the horizon? Primarily a disease of old age, osteoporosis can cause bones to become gradually weaker. Over time, bones becom...

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Hidden culprit in heart failure discovered HIDDEN CULPRIT IN HEART FAILURE DISCOVERED

blog article

Jan 11, 2019

An international research team led by scientists at the University of Alberta have pinpointed a hidden culprit that leads to dilated cardiomyopathy a dangerous condition that accounts for 20 percent of all cases of heart failure which opens the door to potential new treatments that could help counte...

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Exercise can help fight off Alzheimer EXERCISE CAN HELP FIGHT OFF ALZHEIMER'S, BUT HOW?

blog article

Jan 11, 2019

Exercise is a vital element of a healthful lifestyle; it helps maintain heart health, improve mood, and fight weight gain. New research also suggests that it can protect a person's cognitive skills, and a new study uncovers fresh information as to how this can happen.

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Calcium specks could be key prognostic marker of heart disease in South Asians CALCIUM SPECKS COULD BE KEY PROGNOSTIC MARKER OF HEART DISEASE IN SOUTH ASIANS

blog article

Jan 11, 2019

Specks of calcium in the heart's artery walls could be an important prognostic marker of early cardiovascular disease in South Asians and may help guide treatment in this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. In a study of nearly 700 patients with ethnic background...

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3 common drugs can reduce severe mental health symptoms 3 COMMON DRUGS CAN REDUCE SEVERE MENTAL HEALTH SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 11, 2019

A new study revealed that three common drugs normally used to treat cardiovascular problems or diabetes could also aid in the treatment of some serious mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia. Scientists at University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom, Karolinska Institute in Stockh...

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Unconventional T cells may account for failure of IL-17 inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis UNCONVENTIONAL T CELLS MAY ACCOUNT FOR FAILURE OF IL-17 INHIBITION IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

Spondyloarthritis is one of the most common types of chronic joint inflammation affecting nearly 1-2% of the Western population. Cytokine blockade of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and more recently Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has revolutionized the perspectives of patients suffering from this disease by ac...

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UMN Medical School research uncovers how to treat diastolic heart failure UMN MEDICAL SCHOOL RESEARCH UNCOVERS HOW TO TREAT DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

Research shows magnesium improves a form of heart failure previously without treatment Research out of University Minnesota Medical School and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight uncovers what causes diastolic heart failure and how it can be treated. In the article, "Magn...

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Expression of a molecule in blood cells inversely predicts the appearance of subclinical atherosclerosis EXPRESSION OF A MOLECULE IN BLOOD CELLS INVERSELY PREDICTS THE APPEARANCE OF SUBCLINICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

Earlier detection of cardiovascular disease is a step closer thanks to the findings of a research team at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) led by Francisco Sánchez-Madrid and Pilar Martín. The scientists have found that the expression level of the molecule...

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How do genetic differences affect the risk of bipolar disorder? HOW DO GENETIC DIFFERENCES AFFECT THE RISK OF BIPOLAR DISORDER?

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

Fresh insights from a recent study of the genetics and biology of bipolar disorder could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the debilitating condition. So concluded the scientists at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge wh...

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S: 9 NEW GENETIC RISK FACTORS FOUND

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

New research, published in the journal Nature Genetics, identifies new genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. It also uncovers novel biological mechanisms that may lead to this neurodegenerative condition. About 5.7 million people in the United States are currently living with Alzhei...

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Ayurveda For Common Cold: Cold Symptoms, Cold Medicine, Cold Vs Flu AYURVEDA FOR COMMON COLD: COLD SYMPTOMS, COLD MEDICINE, COLD VS FLU

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

A change of every season requires a change in diet and lifestyle. Ayurveda prescribes a distinctive lifestyle and diet to both wards off and beats the common cold and cold systems. Using only natural ingredients, Ayurvedic medicine offers excellent treatment options like cold medicine and remedies. ...

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Eliminate Puffy Eyes Naturally With Ayurvedic Wellness ELIMINATE PUFFY EYES NATURALLY WITH AYURVEDIC WELLNESS

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

Puffy eyes occur for many reasons. Inherited facial features, allergies, stress, eye fatigue and individual skin characteristics such as texture can all contribute to puffy eyes. A long-lasting solution depends on the underlying cause. Ordinary swelling around the eyes means you have an excessive ac...

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Raising histamine levels boosts long-term memory RAISING HISTAMINE LEVELS BOOSTS LONG-TERM MEMORY

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

According to a fascinating new study, taking a drug that increases histamine levels in the brain could improve performance in long-term memory tests. Histamine carries out multiple roles in the body. Perhaps most famous for its role in the immune system, histamine also helps regulate gut function an...

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Stem cell study optimizes bone marrow transplants STEM CELL STUDY OPTIMIZES BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTS

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

A study has shown that transplanted stem cells do not behave ‘normally’, as they would in a healthy person without a transplant. Bone marrow transplants are often the best course of treatment for many different types of cancers, blood disorders, and immune diseases. Despite over 22,000 o...

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What dictates how vitamin E supplements affect cancer risk? WHAT DICTATES HOW VITAMIN E SUPPLEMENTS AFFECT CANCER RISK?

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

There is a longstanding debate as to whether taking vitamin E supplements increases or decreases a person's risk of developing cancer. A new study suggests that both outcomes are a possibility and also explains why. Many people believe that taking supplements can improve their well-being an...

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5 Ayurvedic Ways to Care for Your Skin this Winter 5 AYURVEDIC WAYS TO CARE FOR YOUR SKIN THIS WINTER

blog article

Jan 10, 2019

In most areas of the United States, early winter is the time when the dryness of fall meets the cold of winter. Many of us begin "winding up" for the holidays, bringing stress levels to an all-time high for the year. Others will be outdoors skiing, snowboarding, and snowshoeing. Whatever y...

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Does this common food additive stop us exercising? DOES THIS COMMON FOOD ADDITIVE STOP US EXERCISING?

blog article

Jan 09, 2019

A two-part study that examined both mice and humans revealed a strong link between inorganic phosphate, a food additive that is prevalent in the "Western diet," and a lack of physical activity. According to the latest statistics from the United States Department of Health and Human Se...

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Cancer: A new CANCER: A NEW 'DRUG SPONGE' MAY REDUCE CHEMO'S TOXIC EFFECTS

blog article

Jan 09, 2019

Researchers have developed an innovative, personalized absorber that can "catch" toxic chemotherapy drugs when they "leak out" of a treated organ. This could help reduce the adverse side effects of these cancer treatments. A team of researchers from institutions across the U...

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Nutrient in mother NUTRIENT IN MOTHER'S DIET MAY HELP FIGHT ALZHEIMER'S IN OFFSPRING

blog article

Jan 09, 2019

Recent research suggests that a maternal diet that is high in an essential nutrient can reduce the impact of Alzheimer's disease on future generations. In the study, scientists bred mice that were genetically predisposed to develop hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease from females whose die...

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Drug sponge could minimize the effects of cancer therapy DRUG SPONGE COULD MINIMIZE THE EFFECTS OF CANCER THERAPY

blog article

Jan 09, 2019

A drug ‘sponge’ could be the future method of soaking up excess drugs within the body after cancer treatments such as chemotherapy to prevent side effects A ‘drug sponge’ could be used in future to soak up excess drugs in the hope that it would prevent debilitating and d...

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Scientists design SCIENTISTS DESIGN 'SMART' WOUND HEALING TECHNIQUE

blog article

Jan 08, 2019

 New research, published in the journal Advanced Materials, paves the way for "a new generation of materials that actively work with tissues to drive [wound] healing." As more and more surgical procedures are performed in the United States, the number of surgical site infections ...

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Racial Differences In Alzheimer’s Disease Unveiled RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE UNVEILED

blog article

Jan 08, 2019

African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop Alzheimer’s disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white pool of research participants. Consequently, little is known about...

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Mice Sleeping Fitfully Provide Clues To Insomnia MICE SLEEPING FITFULLY PROVIDE CLUES TO INSOMNIA

blog article

Jan 08, 2019

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied mice genetically modified to mimic the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), which is associated with sleep problems. They found that animals, like some people with NF1, slept in short, irregular spurts. Studying ...

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Resistance To Cancer Treatment Is A Chain Reaction RESISTANCE TO CANCER TREATMENT IS A CHAIN REACTION

blog article

Jan 08, 2019

Research has shown tumors have two common ways of resisting targeted cancer treatment. Until now, those resistance mechanisms were thought to be separate, but a new study from the Abramson Cancer Center is the first to show they’re actually connected by a process called ER translocation where ...

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AI used to diagnose diabetic eye disease AI USED TO DIAGNOSE DIABETIC EYE DISEASE

blog article

Jan 08, 2019

Artificial Intelligence has been used to cost-effectively diagnose diabetic-related eye disease automatically with far more accuracy than current methods. Artificial Intelligence has been used to support the early diagnosis of diabetes-related eye diseases, one of the main causes of blindness.

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Inhalable mRNA could treat lung disease INHALABLE MRNA COULD TREAT LUNG DISEASE

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

Cells can be induced to produce therapeutic proteins by messenger RNA (mRNA), which can then be used to treat numerous diseases. Researchers at Massachusettes Institute of Technology (MIT) have designed an inhalable form of mRNA, to overcome the biggest obstacle in this approach the method of delive...

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Overcoming Challenges in Biopharma: Transformational Innovation is Key OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN BIOPHARMA: TRANSFORMATIONAL INNOVATION IS KEY

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

The major multinational pharmaceutical companies, which were once considered traditional pharma companies, are now shifting their presence into biopharma on an unprecedented scale. However, with this comes growing pains. Looking at the industry growth and the complexities of biopharma development, i...

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Fluctuating Personal Income May Be Associated With An Increased Heart Disease Risk FLUCTUATING PERSONAL INCOME MAY BE ASSOCIATED WITH AN INCREASED HEART DISEASE RISK

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

Sudden, unpredictable drops in personal income during young adulthood are associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease and/or dying from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. In the United States, the recent rise in ...

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Triple-negative breast cancer responds to new dual-target therapy TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER RESPONDS TO NEW DUAL-TARGET THERAPY

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

An experimental therapy has shown promising results fighting particularly aggressive breast cancer with limited treatment options. A recent study has revealed that the novel treatment decreased the growth and spread of triple-negative breast cancer in mice. The approach uses a protein to block two g...

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Implementing new technologies in national healthcare systems: the introduction of NGS testing in cancer IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN NATIONAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS: THE INTRODUCTION OF NGS TESTING IN CANCER

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

 Next generation sequencing technologies are aiding in the development of targeted cancer therapies and are becoming part of routine clinical practices. However, the introduction of these complex technologies poses major challenges. In this blog, Els Van Valckenborgh, author of research publish...

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Understanding humans – the key to African swine fever control UNDERSTANDING HUMANS – THE KEY TO AFRICAN SWINE FEVER CONTROL

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

For more than ten years African swine fever (ASF) has been spreading in Eurasia, currently expanding its territory both west- and eastwards. The disease affects domestic pigs and wild boar: animals usually die within three to ten days after infection and the case fatality rate can be almost 100%.

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This Little-Known Brain Chemical is the Reason Why Your Memory Is Losing Its Edge THIS LITTLE-KNOWN BRAIN CHEMICAL IS THE REASON WHY YOUR MEMORY IS LOSING ITS EDGE

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

It all started with minor slips you easily dismissed as "senior moments." You forgot your keys. You called someone by the wrong name. The word you were looking for was on the tip of your tongue, but you couldn't quite grasp it. You don't feel any older, but you do feel yourself cha...

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It’s Not Epilepsy: Counseling Helps Those With Often Misdiagnosed Seizure Disorder IT’S NOT EPILEPSY: COUNSELING HELPS THOSE WITH OFTEN MISDIAGNOSED SEIZURE DISORDER

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

One of four patients admitted to hospitals for evaluation of seizures don’t have epilepsy but rather have a debilitating and difficult to diagnose condition known as psychogenic non-epileptic seizures or PNES. Nearly 80 percent of these patients who suffer seizures not caused by altered electr...

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Spit Test Detects Presence of Malaria-causing Parasites SPIT TEST DETECTS PRESENCE OF MALARIA-CAUSING PARASITES

blog article

Jan 07, 2019

An easy-to-use saliva test to screen for the parasite that causes malaria has been developed, and details of the assay have been published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The non-invasive “spit test” could be a key tool in efforts to eradicate malaria, which kills a child ...

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Nanosatellite system imagery could revolutionise lab imaging NANOSATELLITE SYSTEM IMAGERY COULD REVOLUTIONISE LAB IMAGING

blog article

Jan 06, 2019

Nanosatellite system imagery could dramatically alter lab imaging, changing the way microscopes and other laboratory imaging systems work. Researchers at Ben-Gurion University have developed a new satellite imaging system that could revolutionize the economics and imagery available from space-based ...

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Natural Allergies Treatment Home Remedies From Ayurveda NATURAL ALLERGIES TREATMENT HOME REMEDIES FROM AYURVEDA

blog article

Jan 05, 2019

According to the Allergy & Asthma Foundation of America, 1 in 5 people, or an estimated 50 million Americans suffer from some type of allergies.1 We’re all pretty familiar with allergies. An allergy is a hypersensitive reaction to a substance that is in fact harmless. So what can you do? I...

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Ayurvedic Treatment for Typhoid AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR TYPHOID

blog article

Jan 04, 2019

Typhoid is not a modern-day disease. People in India have always referred to it as “motijhara” and “Daane wala bukhaar” in regional languages. It is a type of intestinal disease that affects the whole body. Eating contaminated food/water or being in contact with suffering pat...

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Medicinal Uses of Punarnava (Hogweed) MEDICINAL USES OF PUNARNAVA (HOGWEED)

blog article

Jan 04, 2019

“Always praised” is the meaning of the Sanskrit name Punarnava. There are many benefits, and the herb has been used in indigenous medicine from time immemorial. ‘Punar’ denotes restoring or regaining and ‘nava’ means new. Punarnava, as the name suggests, has the t...

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Can Triphala Cause Bloating? CAN TRIPHALA CAUSE BLOATING?

blog article

Jan 04, 2019

Triphala is an Ayurvedic compound herb that has been used for hundreds of years to cleanse the body. It has numerous benefits, including weight loss, but may have some potential side effects. Can Triphala cause bloating? Let’s take a look at some concerns you need to be aware of when taking Tr...

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Arthritis Pain Relief (Joint Pain): Can Ayurvedic Herbal Oils + Essential Oils Help? ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF (JOINT PAIN): CAN AYURVEDIC HERBAL OILS + ESSENTIAL OILS HELP?

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

Arthritis is not a single disease but a formal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease featuring inflammation. It can affect one joint or multiple joints. Western medicine recognizes more than 100 different types of arthritis, with different causes and treatment methods. In this article, we&...

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What Does It Mean If Your Temples Hurt? (Temple Pain, Sore Temples, Temple Headache Relief) WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF YOUR TEMPLES HURT? (TEMPLE PAIN, SORE TEMPLES, TEMPLE HEADACHE RELIEF)

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

Temples are the flat region on either side of the forehead, behind the eyes. They are one of the most sensitive and delicate parts of the head. Sore temples or temple pain is truly uncomfortable.What does it mean if your temples hurt? Read through for temple headache relief with Ayurveda.

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Bioengineering and Food Labeling Requirements BIOENGINEERING AND FOOD LABELING REQUIREMENTS

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

When you go to the supermarket these days, a baffling and sometimes overwhelming array of products are available to the consumer organic, ethically sourced, free-form, insect-friendly, free-range the list goes on. But which one to pick, do you know what is really in the product and even then, do you...

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ddPCR Brings Confidence to Leukemia Monitoring DDPCR BRINGS CONFIDENCE TO LEUKEMIA MONITORING

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

Droplet digital PCR is sensitive enough to detect rare DNA sequences such as BCR-ABL gene fusions. From left: the sample is partitioned into 20,000 nanoliter-sized droplets; each droplet undergoes PCR amplification to the endpoint, and droplets that contain the target DNA fluoresce; positive droplet...

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Implantable device could treat bladder problems IMPLANTABLE DEVICE COULD TREAT BLADDER PROBLEMS

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

The team of engineers and neuroscientists, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, developed the soft device in order to help people bypass the need for medi...

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Giving up alcohol for just 1 month has lasting benefits GIVING UP ALCOHOL FOR JUST 1 MONTH HAS LASTING BENEFITS

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

Many of us will have enjoyed numerous glasses of wine, beer, champagne, or other alcoholic beverages over the winter holidays. Thus, in January, we may feel the need to take a break from alcohol. An alcohol-free month is the best choice we could possibly make for our health, British researchers conc...

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Antibiotic misuse in children still a concern in the US ANTIBIOTIC MISUSE IN CHILDREN STILL A CONCERN IN THE US

blog article

Jan 03, 2019

The news comes despite the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guideline’s advice not to routinely use antibiotics in children with the disease, as it carries an extremely low risk (below 1%) of causing any bacterial infection. The study authors analyzed data collected by the National Hospita...

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The Biochemistry and Pharmacologic Properties of Cannabis-derived Terpenoids THE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGIC PROPERTIES OF CANNABIS-DERIVED TERPENOIDS

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

Terpenoids are responsible for the unique aroma of cannabis. These compounds are lipophilic, can permeate lipid membranes, and several are capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier after inhalation. We recently spoke to Ethan Russo, MD, to learn more about the biochemistry and potential pharmacolo...

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Diabetes: Drug duo helps body replenish its insulin-producing cells DIABETES: DRUG DUO HELPS BODY REPLENISH ITS INSULIN-PRODUCING CELLS

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

Scientists have taken a key step in the pursuit of a cure for diabetes that restores the body's ability to make insulin. They have created a new drug cocktail that can induce insulin-producing cells to regenerate at a rate that is fast enough to work in human treatments. The recent stu...

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Using machine learning to predict symptoms USING MACHINE LEARNING TO PREDICT SYMPTOMS

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

Researchers at the University of Surrey have developed Artificial Intelligence that is able to predict symptoms and how severe they could be through the course of a patient’s treatment. Two machine learning models were developed and are able to accurately predict the severity of common symptom...

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Panchabhautik Chikitsa: A Unique Branch Of Ayurvedic Medicine PANCHABHAUTIK CHIKITSA: A UNIQUE BRANCH OF AYURVEDIC MEDICINE

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

Panchabhautik chikitsa is a unique branch of Ayurveda. It is based on one of Ayurveda’s core philosophies macrocosm and microcosm. Panchabhautik chikitsa is a principle of analysis and treatment. It was brought into practice by Vaidya Raj Atmaram Vaman Datar Shastri who we’ll refer to as...

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6 Adaptogens From Ayurveda (For Sleep, Stress, Depression + Weight Loss) 6 ADAPTOGENS FROM AYURVEDA (FOR SLEEP, STRESS, DEPRESSION + WEIGHT LOSS)

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

While popular usage of the term adaptogen is relatively recent, the use of Ayurvedic adaptogens traces back thousands of years. In this article, we’ll look at the origins and benefits of adaptogens as well as six Ayurvedic adaptogens for sleep, energy, stress, depression and weight loss. Here&...

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The Biochemistry and Pharmacologic Properties of Cannabis-derived Terpenoids THE BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGIC PROPERTIES OF CANNABIS-DERIVED TERPENOIDS

blog article

Jan 02, 2019

Terpenoids are responsible for the unique aroma of cannabis. These compounds are lipophilic, can permeate lipid membranes, and several are capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier after inhalation. We recently spoke to Ethan Russo, MD, to learn more about the biochemistry and potential pharmacolo...

Read More

Hair Growth: Ayurveda For Long Locks HAIR GROWTH: AYURVEDA FOR LONG LOCKS

blog article

Jan 01, 2019

Everyone wants beautiful and healthy hair. So what if I told you that good texture, healthy hair growth, big volume, and luster were all achievable. Would you believe me? This article is not about hair care products. In this article, we’ll give you some tips on hair growth and how to make your...

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10 Ayurvedic Ways To Get Rid Of Runny Nose And Sniffles Fast 10 AYURVEDIC WAYS TO GET RID OF RUNNY NOSE AND SNIFFLES FAST

blog article

Jan 01, 2019

Constant sniffles and a runny nose can be very irritating, especially when it keeps on dripping. A runny nose and sniffles can have two causes. They can be caused by cold temperatures during the winter and rainy seasons and are often accompanied by a sore throat and sometimes fever. A runny nose and...

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Moderate Drinking Not Harmful For Older Patients With Heart Failure MODERATE DRINKING NOT HARMFUL FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE

blog article

Dec 31, 2018

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. However, the findings do not suggest that nondrinkers should start imbib...

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Can exercise lower blood pressure as effectively as drugs? CAN EXERCISE LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE AS EFFECTIVELY AS DRUGS?

blog article

Dec 31, 2018

Millions of people live with high blood pressure, which can place them at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. For this condition, doctors typically prescribe blood-lowering drugs, but could exercise help just as well? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), ap...

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Mindfulness MINDFULNESS 'HAS HUGE POTENTIAL' AS A WEIGHT LOSS STRATEGY

blog article

Dec 30, 2018

As the holiday season draws to a close, many of us may be struggling with the extra weight we put on during extensive, food-filled celebrations with family and friends. Can mindfulness techniques come to our aid in getting rid of those extra pounds? According to anecdotal evidence and some exis...

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Does magnesium hold the key to vitamin D benefits? DOES MAGNESIUM HOLD THE KEY TO VITAMIN D BENEFITS?

blog article

Dec 30, 2018

New research finds that magnesium may hold the key to understanding how vitamin D levels relate to health and disease. Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, has enjoyed something of celebrity status, receiving praise for a multitude of health benefits. Yet, in the complex web of biological ...

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How coffee might protect against Parkinson HOW COFFEE MIGHT PROTECT AGAINST PARKINSON'S

blog article

Dec 29, 2018

Coffee is thought to protect the brain against Parkinson's disease. A recent study investigates which compounds might give coffee its neuroprotective powers. The findings may eventually lead to innovative new treatments. More than 60,000 people are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in the U...

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Bipolar: Physical activity may boost mood and energy BIPOLAR: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY MAY BOOST MOOD AND ENERGY

blog article

Dec 29, 2018

New research, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, found that higher levels of physical activity boost mood and energy levels. The benefits were particularly noticeable in people with bipolar disorder. In the United States, almost 3 percent of adults experienced bipolar disorder "in the pa...

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Moderate drinking tied to lower risk of hospitalization MODERATE DRINKING TIED TO LOWER RISK OF HOSPITALIZATION

blog article

Dec 28, 2018

New research suggests that moderate drinking may lower the risk of being hospitalized for any cause, including cardiovascular conditions. The effects of alcohol consumption on health are the subject of much controversy. Some studies have suggested that moderate drinking may reduce the risk of s...

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The Myth of Perfect Ayurveda THE MYTH OF PERFECT AYURVEDA

blog article

Dec 28, 2018

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m a recovering perfectionist. And quite honestly, my dedication to excellence served me well for a lot of years. But more recently, I have come to realize the degree to which it has also stood in my way. Interestingly, my relationship with Ayurveda tells...

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Study finds link between obesity and sense of smell STUDY FINDS LINK BETWEEN OBESITY AND SENSE OF SMELL

blog article

Dec 27, 2018

A recent review concludes that people with obesity have a reduced ability to detect and discriminate smell compared with those who are not obese. Obesity is a medical condition characterized by an excessive amount of body fat. It is a global issue that affects millions of people worldwide, and it is...

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How Exercise Reduces Belly Fat In Humans HOW EXERCISE REDUCES BELLY FAT IN HUMANS

blog article

Dec 27, 2018

Some of you may have made a New Year’s resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat. But have you ever wondered how physical activity produces this desired effect? A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 plays a critical role in this process, researchers report December 27 in ...

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Better Mouse Model Built To Enable Precision-Medicine Research For Alzheimer’s BETTER MOUSE MODEL BUILT TO ENABLE PRECISION-MEDICINE RESEARCH FOR ALZHEIMER’S

blog article

Dec 27, 2018

Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Heal...

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Highly Effective Ayurvedic Treatment for Cholesterol HIGHLY EFFECTIVE AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR CHOLESTEROL

blog article

Dec 25, 2018

Cholesterol and triglycerides represent the fats or lipids in the human body. A high level of lipids, in the blood, is known as hyperlipidemia. If blood or serum cholesterol is on the higher side, this condition is known as hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia. Cholesterol resembles with fat, but th...

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Ayurvedic Remedy for Hair Fall and Hair Thinning AYURVEDIC REMEDY FOR HAIR FALL AND HAIR THINNING

blog article

Dec 24, 2018

What is the Ayurvedic Remedy for Hair Fall? In Ayurveda, hair fall has been addressed by various names like Khalitya or Indralupta. This disease is classified under Shiro-roga. This disease is caused by the biological fire, pitta. In common language, it is known as baldness. In medical science, it i...

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Tachycardia treatment at home. How to Naturally Lower Rapid Heart Rate ? TACHYCARDIA TREATMENT AT HOME. HOW TO NATURALLY LOWER RAPID HEART RATE ?

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

Tachycardia also called tachyarrhythmia, is a condition where your heartbeat exceeds more than 100 beats per minute. The average rate is usually between 60 and 100 beats per minute for adults. This puts pressure on the heart muscles that the upper and lower chambers of the heart. However, tachycardi...

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Super-Drug for Pediatric Leukemia? SUPER-DRUG FOR PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA?

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

In a final study published in Genes & Development, researchers at Northwestern University School of Medicine concluded their discoveries on two successful therapeutics that were seen to slow the progression of pediatric leukemia in model mice through the targeting of a key protein called MLL. &q...

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Reversing hearing loss by regrowing hairs REVERSING HEARING LOSS BY REGROWING HAIRS

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

Humans are unable to reverse the effects of hearing loss, but a biological process found in other animal species may hold the key to reversing this widespread problem. How the brain interprets sounds is a relatively simple process. First, a sound enters the ear via soundwaves. It then moves down the...

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Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Treat Heart Failure Syndrome TYPE 2 DIABETES DRUG MAY TREAT HEART FAILURE SYNDROME

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

A drug used in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes, by the name of Metformin, may soon be used to treat heart failure syndrome with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a diagnosis that by the year 2020 is predicted to affect 8% of people 65 or older. The study was carried out by the University of Ariz...

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Preventive Drug Decreases Cases of Leprosy in Morocco PREVENTIVE DRUG DECREASES CASES OF LEPROSY IN MOROCCO

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

Leprosy, also known as Hansen disease, is a disabling chronic and infectious disease that affects the skin and the peripheral nerves. It has a huge effect on public health of communities and nations as a whole. Since 1981, the introduction of antibacterial multidrug therapy has significantly decreas...

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Buruli ulcer: promising drug for a forgotten disease BURULI ULCER: PROMISING DRUG FOR A FORGOTTEN DISEASE

blog article

Dec 23, 2018

One of the most forgotten and neglected diseases is Buruli ulcer, a debilitating and stigmatized condition affecting primarily children in West and Central Africa. Buruli ulcer is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans and results in devastating skin lesions leading to permanent disfiguremen...

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Natural and Ayurvedic Treatment for No or Low Sperm Count, Premature Ejaculation or Erectile Dysfunction NATURAL AND AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR NO OR LOW SPERM COUNT, PREMATURE EJACULATION OR ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

blog article

Dec 22, 2018

Male fertility can be evaluated by semen analysis. Semen analysis determines the quality and quantity of semen and sperm. The normal sperm count varies from 20 to 150 million sperms per millimeter. Among them, at least 60% of sperm should have normal morphology and forward motility to achieve succes...

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Home Remedies and Ayurvedic Treatment for Knee Pain HOME REMEDIES AND AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR KNEE PAIN

blog article

Dec 21, 2018

Knee pain is the most common joint problem seen in most people. Knee pain may be temporary due to strain or physical exertion or due to injuries like ligament/cartilage tear or chronic conditions like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout/pseudogout, septic arthritis, bursitis or infection.

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Mediterranean diet nutrients tied with healthy brain aging MEDITERRANEAN DIET NUTRIENTS TIED WITH HEALTHY BRAIN AGING

blog article

Dec 21, 2018

A recent study has uncovered further evidence of an association between diet and healthy brain aging. It found links between blood markers of certain nutrients in the Mediterranean diet and mental performance and brain connectivity in older adults. Previous research suggested that older adults who m...

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What were the most intriguing medical studies of 2018? WHAT WERE THE MOST INTRIGUING MEDICAL STUDIES OF 2018?

blog article

Dec 21, 2018

With just 11 days left until another new year of medical advances and health research, we take a look at some of the most influential studies that we reported on in 2018. We are about to leave another busy year behind us. It saw important sports events, natural disasters, and the sad loss of more re...

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Bacteria Aids Anti-cancer Drug Delivery BACTERIA AIDS ANTI-CANCER DRUG DELIVERY

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

An interdisciplinary team of three Virginia Tech faculty members affiliated with the Macromolecules Innovation Institute has created a drug delivery system that could radically expand cancer treatment options. The conventional cancer treatment method of injecting nanoparticle drugs into the bloodstr...

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Proofreading Mistakes Drive Autoimmune Disease Involving Key Protein PROOFREADING MISTAKES DRIVE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE INVOLVING KEY PROTEIN

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

A team from Scripps Research has found a molecular cause of a group of rare autoimmune disorders in which the immune system attacks the body’s own healthy cells. The discovery, published Dec. 18 in Nature Communications, improves understanding of a protein’s role in several autoimmune di...

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Combating Neurodegenerative & Age-related Diseases COMBATING NEURODEGENERATIVE & AGE-RELATED DISEASES

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

We recently spoke to Karoly Nikolich, chairman and chief executive officer of Alkahest, a clinical-stage biotechnology company, to learn more about their approach to developing therapeutics for both neurodegenerative and age-related diseases. Karoly touches on the company's mission and highlight...

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6 months of exercise may reverse mild cognitive impairment 6 MONTHS OF EXERCISE MAY REVERSE MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

New research finds that a 6-month regimen of aerobic exercise can reverse symptoms of mild cognitive impairment in older adults. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is characterized by a mild loss of cognitive abilities, such as memory and reasoning skills. A person with MCI may find it hard to remember...

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MS: Disease impact is greater in those with food allergies MS: DISEASE IMPACT IS GREATER IN THOSE WITH FOOD ALLERGIES

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Individuals with multiple sclerosis are more likely to experience higher levels of disease activity if they also have food allergies, according to recent research. Previous studies have proposed that allergy could have a role in multiple sclerosis (MS).

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Ebola – Tools for the new outbreak response EBOLA – TOOLS FOR THE NEW OUTBREAK RESPONSE

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a cause for concern. What can we learn from the 2014 outbreak in West Africa and what tools do we have to fight it. While the Ebola outbreak across West Africa only hit the headlines in 2014, when it caused a two-year epidemic, the disease wa...

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Occasional Use of Antibiotics is a Bigger Problem Than Repeated Use OCCASIONAL USE OF ANTIBIOTICS IS A BIGGER PROBLEM THAN REPEATED USE

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Antibiotic-resistant pathogens are becoming more widespread in the United States. New research reported in eLife by a team at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has determined that many people who occasionally use antibiotics are having a more significant contribution to the problem than ...

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Tingling and Numbness: Causes and Ayurvedic Remedies TINGLING AND NUMBNESS: CAUSES AND AYURVEDIC REMEDIES

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Tingling sensation or stiffness or numbness can be caused by a lot of issues: Burn (heat or fire): Burns that are caused by heat is called a thermal burn. They cause pain, swelling, skin changes, blisters and more. Cauda equina syndrome: Cauda equina syndrome occurs when a bundle of nerves at the lo...

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Daily Milk Cereal Drinks Increases Obesity Risk Later in Childhood DAILY MILK CEREAL DRINKS INCREASES OBESITY RISK LATER IN CHILDHOOD

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

In five-year-old children, the risk of being overweight is almost twice as high if they at 12 months had consumed milk cereal drinks every day, a study in the journal Acta Paediatrica shows. “Milk cereal drinks are not bad as such; how it’s used is the problem. That is when it’s se...

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Is This Why Our Sense of Smell Declines in Old Age? IS THIS WHY OUR SENSE OF SMELL DECLINES IN OLD AGE?

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

As mammals age, their sense of smell deteriorates. In a study published in the journal ‘Cell Reports’, an interdisciplinary research team at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Medical Centre Mainz investigated why this is the case. For their study, the researchers tracked ...

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S: STUDY ZEROES IN ON BRAIN'S WEAKEST LINK

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Alzheimer's disease is a form of neurocognitive decline that affects millions across the world. The exact cause is unclear, but new research is uncovering the mechanisms that allow Alzheimer's to become established in the brain. In Alzheimer's disease, as in other forms of dementia,...

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Why green leafy vegetables can protect liver health WHY GREEN LEAFY VEGETABLES CAN PROTECT LIVER HEALTH

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

New research that features in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) discovers that a compound present in green leafy vegetables helps prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), or liver steatosis, is a condition in wh...

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A New Way To Cut The Power Of Tumors A NEW WAY TO CUT THE POWER OF TUMORS

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Instead of tackling tumors head-on, an international team of researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc in Amsterdam has chosen to regulate their vascularization by intervening with the cellular receptor that is overexpressed specifically in cancer blood v...

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New Study Reveals ‘Startling’ Risk Of Stroke NEW STUDY REVEALS ‘STARTLING’ RISK OF STROKE

blog article

Dec 20, 2018

Globally, one in four people over age 25 is at risk for stroke during their lifetime, according to a new scientific study. Researchers found a nearly 5-fold difference in lifetime stroke risk worldwide, with the highest risk in East Asia and Central and Eastern Europe, and lowest in sub-Saharan Afri...

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Scientists Synthesize Molecule Capable Of Eliminating Hepatitis C Virus SCIENTISTS SYNTHESIZE MOLECULE CAPABLE OF ELIMINATING HEPATITIS C VIRUS

blog article

Dec 19, 2018

A new compound that inhibits the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in several stages of its lifecycle – and is also capable of acting on bacteria, fungi, and cancer cells has been synthesized by researchers at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil. The study was supported by...

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Multiple sclerosis: Could this be why myelin fails to regenerate? MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: COULD THIS BE WHY MYELIN FAILS TO REGENERATE?

blog article

Dec 19, 2018

Recent stem cell research could lead to a new way of treating inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes loss of myelin, which is the fatty coating that insulates the fibers that carry electrical signals in the brain and the rest of the central nervous sys...

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Radiation treatment timing in head and neck cancers RADIATION TREATMENT TIMING IN HEAD AND NECK CANCERS

blog article

Dec 19, 2018

Time is precious, as is human life. Head and neck cancer (HNC) is a fatal disease and if not managed promptly, can lead to disastrous outcomes. A contemporary review published in Cancers of the Head and Neck discusses the importance of overall radiation treatment time in the management of head and n...

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8 Beneficial Yoga Asanas for Treating Kidney Stones – Home Remedies 8 BENEFICIAL YOGA ASANAS FOR TREATING KIDNEY STONES – HOME REMEDIES

blog article

Dec 19, 2018

Having kidney stones is a painful condition to live with. It can happen to anyone at any age. Men are at a higher risk of developing kidney stones than women. Yoga asanas help in stretching the body and stimulate the vital organs including your kidneys and it is, therefore, important to perform yoga...

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Commuters on the London Underground are more likely to catch the flu COMMUTERS ON THE LONDON UNDERGROUND ARE MORE LIKELY TO CATCH THE FLU

blog article

Dec 18, 2018

The London Underground is a crowded and closed environment with frequent visitors - this type of environment can act as a hot-spot for spreading disease. In this Q&A, Dr. Lara Goscé discusses her recent study published in Environmental Health, which suggests a link between public transpor...

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How to prevent festive weight gain without exercising HOW TO PREVENT FESTIVE WEIGHT GAIN WITHOUT EXERCISING

blog article

Dec 17, 2018

During the holiday season, it is difficult to avoid putting on a couple of extra pounds. A recent study investigated a simple, low-impact way to reduce the seasonal swell. During the festive season, people's waistlines tend to expand as their self-control contracts.

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One Type Of Brain Cell May Invite Alzheimer’s ONE TYPE OF BRAIN CELL MAY INVITE ALZHEIMER’S

blog article

Dec 17, 2018

Better tactics for detecting, preventing and treating Alzheimer’s disease depend on a clearer understanding of cellular-level changes in the minds of patients, and a new study has uncovered novel details about the vulnerability of one type of brain cell. Researchers found that excitatory neuro...

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Genetic Cause Of ALS And Frontotemporal Dementia Blocked By RNA-Binding Compound GENETIC CAUSE OF ALS AND FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA BLOCKED BY RNA-BINDING COMPOUND

blog article

Dec 17, 2018

Since the ice bucket challenge went viral in 2014, raising awareness and funding for ALS research, scientists have learned much about a disease that disconnects muscles from nerves, leading to muscle atrophy and eventual death. Their ultimate goal is to create medications capable of stopping ALS in ...

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How to make kefir more healthful using sound HOW TO MAKE KEFIR MORE HEALTHFUL USING SOUND

blog article

Dec 16, 2018

Kefir has shot to fame over recent years for its potential health benefits. Using sound technology, Russian scientists believe they have found a way to increase some of these benefits. Kefir, which is a fermented milk-based drink, is made using kefir grains. Originating in the Caucasus Mountains cen...

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Internet-based CBT effective for treating severe depression INTERNET-BASED CBT EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING SEVERE DEPRESSION

blog article

Dec 16, 2018

New research finds that cognitive behavioral therapy sessions delivered via an app can effectively treat various forms of depression, including a severe form of the condition. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a short-term form of therapy that helps change people's thought patterns.

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How meditation impacts the way we learn HOW MEDITATION IMPACTS THE WAY WE LEARN

blog article

Dec 15, 2018

Many anecdotes and some studies suggest that meditation can be a powerful tool for mental and physical health. New research shows that it may have yet another benefit: to help us learn faster from past experiences. In a new study, researchers from the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom ...

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Diabetes and hypertension drug combo kills cancer cells DIABETES AND HYPERTENSION DRUG COMBO KILLS CANCER CELLS

blog article

Dec 15, 2018

New research, published in the journal Cell Reports, finds a drug combination that kills cancer cells by depleting them of energy. Metformin is a common drug in the fight against type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood sugar by slowing the release of glucose from the liver and the absorption of sugar from ...

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Spray gel could reduce cancer spread after surgery SPRAY GEL COULD REDUCE CANCER SPREAD AFTER SURGERY

blog article

Dec 14, 2018

A sprayable anticancer gel that rouses the immune system could help stop tumor recurrence and spread after surgery. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) are leading the team that is developing the gel, which comes in the form of a sprayable solution. Their aim is that one ...

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IBD increases prostate cancer risk by fivefold IBD INCREASES PROSTATE CANCER RISK BY FIVEFOLD

blog article

Dec 14, 2018

According to the latest research, men with inflammatory bowel disease have a significantly higher risk of developing prostate cancer. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a range of gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, bloating, and cramps. Two of the most common forms of I...

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Vaccine could combat opioid addiction and reduce deaths VACCINE COULD COMBAT OPIOID ADDICTION AND REDUCE DEATHS

blog article

Dec 14, 2018

Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyl, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, of...

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Portable and Speedy Test Detects Ebola in 30 Minutes PORTABLE AND SPEEDY TEST DETECTS EBOLA IN 30 MINUTES

blog article

Dec 14, 2018

Researchers have created a portable and fast-acting test that can distinguish Ebola infections from other fever-causing infectious diseases such as Lassa fever and malaria in around 30 minutes. The study detailing their new device was published in the 12 December issue of Science Translational Medic...

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Mediterranean diet reduces cardiovascular risk by a quarter MEDITERRANEAN DIET REDUCES CARDIOVASCULAR RISK BY A QUARTER

blog article

Dec 14, 2018

A recent study has put the Mediterranean diet to the test once more, attempting to unpick the molecular mechanisms that produce its benefits. Inspired by the traditional eating patterns of people from Greece, Italy, and Spain, the Mediterranean diet can seemingly do no wrong. In a nutshell, the diet...

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Ebola-fighting protein found in the human body EBOLA-FIGHTING PROTEIN FOUND IN THE HUMAN BODY

blog article

Dec 13, 2018

Researchers have discovered a human protein that helps fight the Ebola virus and could one day lead to an effective therapy against the deadly disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. The newly discovered ability of the human protein RBBP6 to interfere with Ebola virus replication su...

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Ingestible capsule controlled wirelessly could treat diseases INGESTIBLE CAPSULE CONTROLLED WIRELESSLY COULD TREAT DISEASES

blog article

Dec 13, 2018

Researchers at MIT, Draper, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. The capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or both, can reside in the stomach for at least a ...

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Lessons learned and best practices from the Polio Eradication Programme in Nigeria LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES FROM THE POLIO ERADICATION PROGRAMME IN NIGERIA

blog article

Dec 13, 2018

A new supplement from the World Health Organization published in BMC Public Health explores the Polio Eradication Programme in Nigeria. Because Nigeria accounts for almost half of the global burden of wild poliovirus (WPV), this important supplement presents innovations, lessons learned and best pra...

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Tackling societal inequalities and institutional discrimination in mental health systems TACKLING SOCIETAL INEQUALITIES AND INSTITUTIONAL DISCRIMINATION IN MENTAL HEALTH SYSTEMS

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

A recently published BMC Medicine article investigates the inherent inequality in the mental health service care received by patients from minority ethnic groups. Here, Dr. Kamaldeep Bhui discusses his team's findings. Health systems exist within specific political and societal contexts, an...

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Disease Risk Seen In Disrupted Biological Clock DISEASE RISK SEEN IN DISRUPTED BIOLOGICAL CLOCK

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

USC scientists report that a novel time-keeping mechanism within liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. This dual function of the nuclear receptor protein HNF4A offers a potential explanation for diseases such as diabetes and c...

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Artificial Intelligence And The Future Of Medicine ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

Washington University researchers are working to develop artificial intelligence (AI) systems for health care, which have the potential to transform the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, helping to ensure that patients get the right treatment at the right time. In a new Viewpoint article publishe...

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Red meat raises heart disease risk through gut bacteria RED MEAT RAISES HEART DISEASE RISK THROUGH GUT BACTERIA

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

Scientists have uncovered further evidence of how a diet rich in red meat interacts with gut bacteria to raise the risk of heart disease. They found that people who ate red meat as their main source of protein for 1 month had levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) that were two to three times ...

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Harmful sugar pills? HARMFUL SUGAR PILLS?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Research published today in Trials explores the negative effects that can be caused by participants being administered placebos in clinical trials, finding that half of the people taking placebos reported side effects from the trial intervention. Here talk about these findings is Dr. Jeremy Howick, ...

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Doctors love golf: Fact or fiction? DOCTORS LOVE GOLF: FACT OR FICTION?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

A long-lived stereotype about doctors is that they are avid golf players. In a new study, featured in the Christmas issue of The BMJ, specialists from the Harvard Medical School tackle this common belief head-on. Every year in the holiday season, the prestigious medical journal The BMJ publishe...

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What to know about stage 4 lymphoma WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT STAGE 4 LYMPHOMA

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Stage 4 lymphoma occurs when cancer has spread to a distant part of the body outside of the lymphatic system, such as the spinal cord, lungs, or liver. Lymphoma is cancer that originates in a type of white blood cell called lymphocytes. These cells travel through the lymphatic system, which is part ...

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Coffee Compounds Could Team Up to Fight Parkinson’s? COFFEE COMPOUNDS COULD TEAM UP TO FIGHT PARKINSON’S?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia - two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration. The discovery, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academ...

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Tau Should be Pursued as Alzheimer TAU SHOULD BE PURSUED AS ALZHEIMER'S BIOMARKER IN BLOOD, RESEARCHERS SAY

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Today, the only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer's disease in life is through brain scans and tests of cerebrospinal fluid that must be collected via lumbar puncture. Though cumbersome and expensive, such tests provide the most accurate diagnoses for patients. Investigators at Brigham and ...

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Ayurvedic Medicine For Acidity AYURVEDIC MEDICINE FOR ACIDITY

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Have you ever felt a burning sensation in your chest or nauseous after a meal? Well, you’re not alone. Over 16% of the Indian urban population face the same. Acidity, also known as Acid Reflux, is the culprit behind. It is one of the most common health conditions worldwide and most of us exper...

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Parkinson PARKINSON'S: DIETARY COMPOUND MOVES TOXIC PROTEIN FROM GUT TO BRAIN

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

A recent study in rats reveals that a now-banned herbicide and a common food-derived chemical can work together to produce symptoms similar to those present in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition. Brain cells in the substantia nigra a region vital for mo...

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Future of Alzheimer FUTURE OF ALZHEIMER'S THERAPY: WHAT IS THE BEST APPROACH?

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Millions of people worldwide live with a form of dementia, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Currently, there is no way to halt its progress, but clinical trials of new drugs are underway. What approach will serve specialists best? According to the World Health Organization (...

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What is the link between HPV and HIV? WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN HPV AND HIV?

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

HPV and HIV are both viruses that cause sexually transmitted infections. The viruses cause different conditions, though people with HIV are more susceptible to HPV than others. People with untreated HIV are more likely to have active HPV infections and may experience worse symptoms of HPV. HPV preve...

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Single-tablet regimens for HIV SINGLE-TABLET REGIMENS FOR HIV

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Healthcare providers can treat HIV using antiretroviral therapy. A person may need to take several tablets a day or a single pill that contains multiple drugs. In this article, we look at the benefits of single-tablet regimens (STRs). We also provide a list of drugs that doctors commonly prescribe i...

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Repurposing wasp venom as antibiotic drugs REPURPOSING WASP VENOM AS ANTIBIOTIC DRUGS

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic to humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs. After performing a systematic study of the antimicrobial properties of a toxin normally foun...

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This form of brain training may help treat severe schizophrenia THIS FORM OF BRAIN TRAINING MAY HELP TREAT SEVERE SCHIZOPHRENIA

blog article

Dec 09, 2018

New research has revealed that targeted cognitive training can successfully reduce cognitive impairment in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is one of the 15 leading causes of disability globally. In the United States, this condition affects more than 3 million people. Symptoms of sch...

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Who is most likely to experience WHO IS MOST LIKELY TO EXPERIENCE 'HANGXIETY?'

blog article

Dec 09, 2018

New research has found that very shy people are more likely to have anxiety, possibly at debilitating levels, during a hangover. The findings also suggest that for these people, "hangxiety" might signal a higher risk of alcohol dependence. Alcohol use disorder (AUD), a chronic conditi...

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Is it possible to reverse IS IT POSSIBLE TO REVERSE 'CHEMO BRAIN?'

blog article

Dec 08, 2018

Chemotherapy can affect a person's brain for years after coming to an end. How does it actually change the brain, and is there anything that scientists can do to reverse these effects? Many people who undergo chemotherapy will notice cognitive impairment and behavioral changes. This might i...

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A new blood test could help diagnose Alzheimer A NEW BLOOD TEST COULD HELP DIAGNOSE ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Dec 08, 2018

Doctors may find it hard to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before the obvious symptoms set in, and many of the current tests for it are expensive and complicated. However, researchers recently devised a blood test that could accurately detect this condition. According to the Alzheimer's A...

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Maternal filarial infection impacts childhood susceptibility to infection MATERNAL FILARIAL INFECTION IMPACTS CHILDHOOD SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFECTION

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

The WHO’s Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis aims to eliminate this Neglected Tropical Disease through mass drug administration programs. Pregnant women and children under the age of 2 are currently not eligible to be part of this program. Yet Madhusmita Bal and colleagues show t...

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Diabetes: Fasting before a blood test might actually be harmful DIABETES: FASTING BEFORE A BLOOD TEST MIGHT ACTUALLY BE HARMFUL

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

Before a blood cholesterol test, doctors typically advise that a person fasts for several hours to get the most accurate results. However, a new study shows that in the case of people with diabetes, this approach could do more harm than good. People with diabetes tend to have higher levels of l...

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What too much sleep can do to your health WHAT TOO MUCH SLEEP CAN DO TO YOUR HEALTH

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

New research finds that both insufficient and excessive sleep may raise the risk of cardiovascular problems and premature death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that a third of the United States population does not get enough sleep. The CDC also warned that sleep deprivat...

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Infections and cancer: The link could be stronger than we think INFECTIONS AND CANCER: THE LINK COULD BE STRONGER THAN WE THINK

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Bacteria could have a bigger involvement in cancer than scientists may have realized, according to recent research. A study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore has uncovered a type of bacterial infection that can disrupt DNA repair in cells, which is a known cause of canc...

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Providing Supervised Medical-Grade Heroin To Heavy Users Can Reduce Harms PROVIDING SUPERVISED MEDICAL-GRADE HEROIN TO HEAVY USERS CAN REDUCE HARMS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Providing supervised access to medical-grade heroin to people whose use continues after trying multiple traditional treatments has been successful in other countries and should be piloted and studied in the United States, according to a new RAND Corporation study. Evidence from other nations suggest...

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OCD: Brain mechanism explains symptoms OCD: BRAIN MECHANISM EXPLAINS SYMPTOMS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

A large review of existing neuroscientific studies unravels the brain circuits and mechanisms that underpin obsessive-compulsive disorder. The researchers hope that the new findings will make existing therapies more effective, "or guide new treatments."

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Frequent Urination: Causes and Ayurvedic Treatment FREQUENT URINATION: CAUSES AND AYURVEDIC TREATMENT

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

The normal frequency of urination varies from 4-7 times to 6- 10 times a day for each individual. Frequent urination is the condition where you tend to pass urine more frequently than what’s normal for you. It may occur either only during night time for some individuals or maybe both morning a...

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15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat 15 LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX FOODS INDIAN DIABETICS CAN EAT

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Low Glycemic Index Foods are a great option for the increasing number of diabetics in India. As more and more members of the younger generations are getting affected, it is important to know that though Diabetes does not have a cure it can be well managed. One major change diabetics can make in thei...

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Prenatal Exposure To Chemicals In Personal Care Products May Speed Puberty In Girls PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS IN PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS MAY SPEED PUBERTY IN GIRLS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap, and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at UC Berkeley. The results, which were published Dec. 4 in the journal Human Reproduction, came from...

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The psychological impact of intensive care THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF INTENSIVE CARE

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

A period in intensive care is known to negatively affect patients' long-term physical, cognitive and psychiatric health, in what's known as post-intensive care syndrome. Researchers from the University of Oxford sought to reveal the impact of an ICU stay on patients' mental health by sur...

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Warming Herbal Chai Recipes for Each Dosha WARMING HERBAL CHAI RECIPES FOR EACH DOSHA

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Brrr...it’s cold outside! Gray days are calling for some inside time preferably on the couch, curled up with a soft blanket, watching a classic film. Add a toasty fire to this story and we’re visualizing a lovely Sunday. During this cold month, being dormant (like the plants) sounds perf...

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Universal 10-minute cancer test in sight UNIVERSAL 10-MINUTE CANCER TEST IN SIGHT

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

Scientists have created an experimental test that can detect cancer in less than 10 minutes. The test uses a DNA feature that seems to be common to all types of cancer and does not occur in healthy tissue. A team at the University of Queensland in Australia has discovered that DNA fragments fro...

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What role do brain lipids play in Parkinson WHAT ROLE DO BRAIN LIPIDS PLAY IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE?

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

New research looks to brain lipids to identify a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects about half a million people in the United States, according to the National Institutes of Health. One of the main characteristics...

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Frazzled receptors could be drug targets for treating major diseases FRAZZLED RECEPTORS COULD BE DRUG TARGETS FOR TREATING MAJOR DISEASES

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

A family of receptors, known as Frizzleds could be used to target numerous disease, including cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Karolinska Institute researchers in Sweden identified how the receptors are activated in cell membranes and are used within processes that are triggered in the...

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New approach turns immune cells into tiny anti-tumour drug factories NEW APPROACH TURNS IMMUNE CELLS INTO TINY ANTI-TUMOUR DRUG FACTORIES

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

In lab and mouse experiments researchers have developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs. Cancer immunotherapy efforts to better arm a patient’s own immune system to attack tumors has shown great potential for treating some cancers. Yet i...

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Potential Seen For Tailoring Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment POTENTIAL SEEN FOR TAILORING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA TREATMENT

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

Advances in rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Research on the drug responses of leukemia stem cells may reveal why some attempts to treat are not successful or why in...

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Investigating Somatic Mutations in Cancer Development INVESTIGATING SOMATIC MUTATIONS IN CANCER DEVELOPMENT

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

All sporadic cancer is caused by acquired somatic mutations (mutations that take place within cells of the body that are not passed down/inherited). Mutations often occur by incorrect repair of DNA damage by impaired DNA pathways such as the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and the DNA misma...

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30 Pharma Companies Using Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery 30 PHARMA COMPANIES USING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

If you read my list of startups using artificial intelligence to drug discovery, you may have wondered: how much traction do these companies actually have? And perhaps, if you work for a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company, a related question: are any of my competitors working with them? To help...

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Are statins overprescribed for cardiovascular disease prevention? ARE STATINS OVERPRESCRIBED FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION?

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

For millions of people who take statins to prevent the onset of cardiovascular disease, the potential harms of the cholesterol-lowering medication may outweigh the benefits. So concludes a recent modeling study from the University of Zurich in Switzerland that questions whether statins are &quo...

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Researchers find new drug combo to challenge cancer RESEARCHERS FIND NEW DRUG COMBO TO CHALLENGE CANCER

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Researchers have discovered that a particular drug combination may have a more significant effect against melanoma, a type of cancer that typically occurs in the skin, than other medications. According to recent studies, one of the best ways of blocking melanoma is by administering protein kina...

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These 10 essential oils can kill persistent Lyme disease THESE 10 ESSENTIAL OILS CAN KILL PERSISTENT LYME DISEASE

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Research just published in the journal Antibiotics shows that a range of essential oils can effectively kill persistent forms of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is an infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), which is transmitted to humans by ticks. In the United States, Ly...

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Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities GUT MICROBIOME DIFFERS AMONG ETHNICITIES

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Research increasingly links the gut microbiome to a range of human maladies, including inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, and even cancer. Attempts to manipulate the gut with food rich in healthy bacteria, such as yogurt or kombucha, are in vogue, along with buying commercial probiotics that prom...

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Essential oils from garlic and other herbs kill ‘persister’ Lyme disease bacteria. ESSENTIAL OILS FROM GARLIC AND OTHER HERBS KILL ‘PERSISTER’ LYME DISEASE BACTERIA.

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Oils from garlic and several other common herbs and medicinal plants show strong activity against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. These oils may be especially useful in alleviating Lyme symptoms that pers...

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The Gut - Mixing Pot for Antibiotic Resistance Genes THE GUT - MIXING POT FOR ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut. The human gut is home to trillions of microorganisms, mainly bacteria. Most of these are sensitive...

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App Aims to Encourage At-Home HIV Testing APP AIMS TO ENCOURAGE AT-HOME HIV TESTING

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. Home-based testing kits have yet to be approved for sale in Canada. However, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill...

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How to Break Uric Acid Build Up the Ayurvedic Way! HOW TO BREAK URIC ACID BUILD UP THE AYURVEDIC WAY!

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

Some of the food we eat contains purines and when these purines are broken down in our bodies, uric acid is produced. Though uric acid is helpful in little amounts, the build-up of uric acid leads to gout as the kidneys are unable to flush it out effectively. If your body has a high concentration of...

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What Causes Dry Eyes and How to Manage it With Ayurveda! WHAT CAUSES DRY EYES AND HOW TO MANAGE IT WITH AYURVEDA!

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

Dry eye is a condition where there is an inadequate production of tears in your eyes leading to irritation. Even the decrease in the quality of tears also leads to dry eyes. It is termed as keratoconjunctivitis. Aging and menopause. Certain medications like antihistamines, decongestants, antihyperte...

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Shifting the Treatment Paradigm in Blood Cancers: New Insights SHIFTING THE TREATMENT PARADIGM IN BLOOD CANCERS: NEW INSIGHTS

blog article

Dec 01, 2018

For decades, the approach to treating diseases like acute leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma was based on assigning patients to prognostic groups and making uniform treatment decisions within that group. But with comprehensive genomic profiling, we can begin to unravel the heterogeneity within each gro...

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Single-Cell DNA Sequencing Platform Weaves a Way Towards Personalized Cancer Treatment SINGLE-CELL DNA SEQUENCING PLATFORM WEAVES A WAY TOWARDS PERSONALIZED CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Nov 30, 2018

High-throughput single-cell analysis has been regularly acclaimed as a transformative technology for sequencing and a huge step towards the goal of personalized medicine. Over the last few years, a series of applications and techniques have been touted as a Big Step Forward. Tapestri, a sequencing p...

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Discovering Druggable Targets DISCOVERING DRUGGABLE TARGETS

blog article

Nov 30, 2018

We recently spoke to Dr. Kilian V. M. Huber from the Structural Genomics Consortium & Target Discovery Institute, University of Oxford, to find out – ‘What makes a good target?’. Kilian touches on the research being conducted at the Target Discovery Institute, the methods used ...

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Target Identification & Validation in Drug Discovery TARGET IDENTIFICATION & VALIDATION IN DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Nov 29, 2018

The key to good drug design is working out and capturing the clinical spectrum of disease and the exact role a potential therapeutic target plays in the disease. In the words of the German researcher, Paul Ehrlich, known for his countless contributions to the field of pharmacology, “corpora no...

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Low back pain: Pulsed radiofrequency may be the answer LOW BACK PAIN: PULSED RADIOFREQUENCY MAY BE THE ANSWER

blog article

Nov 29, 2018

A new study reveals that pulsed radiofrequency may help patients with low back pain that has not responded to conservative therapy. Low back pain affects millions of people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in the United States, about 80 percent of a...

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Artificial Intelligence in the Pharmaceutical Industry – An Overview of Innovations ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY – AN OVERVIEW OF INNOVATIONS

blog article

Nov 29, 2018

Several factors have contributed to the advancement of AI in the pharmaceutical industry. These factors include the increase in the size of and the greater variety of types of biomedical datasets, as a result of the increased usage of electronic health records. We researched the use of AI in the pha...

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Personalized: Lung cancer’s present offers a glimpse at cancer’s future PERSONALIZED: LUNG CANCER’S PRESENT OFFERS A GLIMPSE AT CANCER’S FUTURE

blog article

Nov 28, 2018

The impact of precision medicine on cancer treatment becomes more apparent each day. If you consider the patient experience, you start to see how much has changed already and how much more is possible. When I began caring for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) about 30 years ago, the m...

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5 Self-Care Gifts for Yourself 5 SELF-CARE GIFTS FOR YOURSELF

blog article

Nov 27, 2018

We take care of our cars, our homes, our jobs, our children, and the many people we love. Why then can it be so difficult to give ourselves the care and attention we also need and deserve? For some, self-care may feel selfish or even frivolous. As we are an ever-productive culture, some may even fee...

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Freeze-dried vaccine may help eradicate polio FREEZE-DRIED VACCINE MAY HELP ERADICATE POLIO

blog article

Nov 27, 2018

USC researchers have developed a polio vaccine that doesn’t require refrigeration, meaning it could someday be used all over the world to deliver the final blow to this longtime foe. The injectable vaccine, which was freeze-dried into a powder, kept at room temperature for four weeks and then ...

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One-Pot Reactions: Synthesizing Natural Product Analogs for Drug Discovery ONE-POT REACTIONS: SYNTHESIZING NATURAL PRODUCT ANALOGS FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Scientists, led by Prof. Taleb H. Al-Tel, at the University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates have discovered powerful new reactions for the diastereo- and enantio-selective synthesis of nature-inspired privileged structures – one-pot, modular, elegantly designed chemical reactions that c...

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Sperm SPERM'S INBUILT HOMING DEVICE

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery. Sperm are excellent navigators. ...

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Do cancer treatments accelerate brain aging? DO CANCER TREATMENTS ACCELERATE BRAIN AGING?

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Cancer treatments can work, but the same factors that help them eradicate tumors may also accelerate aging processes in the body especially the brain. New research explores. Previously on Medical News Today, we covered a study explaining that an experience called chemo brain affects many people...

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Impaired Transmission of Cellular Force - Culprit in Valvular Heart Disease IMPAIRED TRANSMISSION OF CELLULAR FORCE - CULPRIT IN VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

About three percent of the world’s population is affected by valvular heart diseases. It is also the most common cause of heart surgery, as no drug-based treatment is available. Recent research has shed light on the molecular mechanism on the valvular disease that is caused by a genetic mutati...

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Breast Tumors Boost Their Growth by Recruiting Cells Formed in the Bone Marrow BREAST TUMORS BOOST THEIR GROWTH BY RECRUITING CELLS FORMED IN THE BONE MARROW

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Researchers in Israel have discovered that breast tumors can boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells originally formed in the bone marrow. The study, which will be published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the recruitment of bone marrow-derived fibroblasts lo...

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'DNA ORIGAMI' TACKLES MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT CANCER CELLS

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

A DNA tool that combines gene therapy with chemotherapy could be a promising new way to defeat multidrug-resistant cancer cells. The tool is a "tailored DNA nanoplatform" that can carry chemotherapy drugs into targeted cancer cells while also silencing the cells' drug-resistance genes....

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8 Effective Ayurvedic Hair Oils To Prevent Hair Fall and Premature Graying of Hair 8 EFFECTIVE AYURVEDIC HAIR OILS TO PREVENT HAIR FALL AND PREMATURE GRAYING OF HAIR

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

One of these Ayurvedic hair oils is certainly going to prevent hair fall and rescue your hair! Hair fall and thinning hair, baldness, dandruff and scalp problems, split ends and premature graying of hair are common hair problems. If you suffer from any of these woes, then it is time to consider repl...

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Vitiligo Treatment in Ayurveda With Bakuchi And Correct Diet VITILIGO TREATMENT IN AYURVEDA WITH BAKUCHI AND CORRECT DIET

blog article

Nov 25, 2018

Learn about Vitiligo treatment in Ayurveda which can help you get back to normal health. Vitiligo (or Leucoderma / white patches / Switra / Safed Daag)  is a skin pigmentation disorder occurring due to the death of melanocytes, resulting in loss of skin color, the formation of patches. It can a...

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23 Easy Home Remedies for Kidney Stones 23 EASY HOME REMEDIES FOR KIDNEY STONES

blog article

Nov 24, 2018

Kidneys perform the important task of removing waste products and excess fluids from our body through urine.  They are instrumental in maintaining the chemical balance of our bodies.  It goes without saying, therefore, that healthy kidneys equal to a healthy body. Kidney stones form when t...

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5 Dangerous Causes and Home Remedies of Diabetic Neuropathy 5 DANGEROUS CAUSES AND HOME REMEDIES OF DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Are you diabetic and need help to fight diabetic neuropathy? Ayurvedic treatment for diabetic neuropathy is one of the most underrated yet powerful treatments available. Do you feel numbness and tingling in your hands and legs often? If these symptoms are followed by tiredness, muscular cramps, and ...

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Vanderbilt researchers isolate antibody that can neutralize West Nile virus VANDERBILT RESEARCHERS ISOLATE ANTIBODY THAT CAN NEUTRALIZE WEST NILE VIRUS

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have isolated a human monoclonal antibody that can “neutralize” the West Nile virus and potentially prevent a leading cause of viral encephalitis (brain inflammation) in the United States. Their findings, reported this we...

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New blood test can detect ovarian cancer in its early stages NEW BLOOD TEST CAN DETECT OVARIAN CANCER IN ITS EARLY STAGES

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Relatively few cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed in their early stages, so many people lose the opportunity for effective treatment. A newly developed blood test, however, could change this situation. The American Cancer Society (ACS) state that "only about 20 percent of ovarian cancers are...

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Brain health: Low-protein, high-carb diet just as good as low-calorie diet BRAIN HEALTH: LOW-PROTEIN, HIGH-CARB DIET JUST AS GOOD AS LOW-CALORIE DIET

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

New research, published in the journal Cell Reports, suggests that a low-protein, high-carb diet may be an easier alternative to calorie restriction for people looking to preserve brain health and prevent cognitive decline. As the world's population ages, protecting against a cognitive decline i...

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Why does psoriasis increase diabetes risk? WHY DOES PSORIASIS INCREASE DIABETES RISK?

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Previous research demonstrated that having psoriasis increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A new study has tried to understand why this occurs. Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin condition, affecting an estimated 2.2 percent of people in the United States. For decades, we have known...

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Obesity: Researchers identify 4 subtypes OBESITY: RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY 4 SUBTYPES

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Researchers have called obesity an epidemic, and many are working hard to develop a solution. But is there a single answer? New research suggests that obesity takes different shapes and that the same approach will not work for everyone. Specialists from the World Health Organization (WHO) refer...

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This is how your brain predicts future events THIS IS HOW YOUR BRAIN PREDICTS FUTURE EVENTS

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Brains learn how to anticipate future occurrences from patterns. This process is called "anticipatory timing," and it allows us to successfully interact with the world around us. How does it work? Anticipatory timing is, in part, what allows us to make the most appropriate decisions in a v...

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Could managing cholesterol prevent Alzheimer COULD MANAGING CHOLESTEROL PREVENT ALZHEIMER'S?

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

The largest genetic study of Alzheimer's disease to date finds that a "handful of gene variants" increases some people's risk of both dementia and cardiovascular disease. The findings imply that, in principle, we may be able to repurpose some cardiovascular drugs to prevent or trea...

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Endometriosis is Treatable – Here’s Your Guide to Ayurvedic Treatment for Endometriosis ENDOMETRIOSIS IS TREATABLE – HERE’S YOUR GUIDE TO AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR ENDOMETRIOSIS

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Endometriosis is a painful gynecological disorder. But it is Treatable. Endometriosis is a disorder in which the tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus grows outside your uterus. In endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would- it thickens, breaks d...

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Breast Cancer Drug BREAST CANCER DRUG 'TAMOXIFEN' BRINGS HOPE TO MUSCLE DISEASE

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Tamoxifen is currently a drug used in the treatment of breast cancer and has been used in patients for many years. Now, the latest research has indicated that Tamoxifen may hold the potential in treating another disease myotubular myopathy by slowing its progression. A severe genetic disease af...

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Melanoma: Keeping these molecules apart could stop cancer spread MELANOMA: KEEPING THESE MOLECULES APART COULD STOP CANCER SPREAD

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

The interaction between two particular molecules may be the reason why melanoma tumors grow and are likely to spread to other parts of the body. This is the conclusion that researchers at the University of Tokyo in Japan reached after studying these molecules in cells and mice. One of the molecules ...

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S VACCINE DRAWS CLOSER

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Building on decades of research, a new paper brings us one step closer to a vaccine that targets the neurological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Prevention may soon be possible. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is a degenerative neurological disease. Memory issues ar...

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Drug Screening: Cellular proliferation assay performed inside a mouse DRUG SCREENING: CELLULAR PROLIFERATION ASSAY PERFORMED INSIDE A MOUSE

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Although many new cellular assays entered the drug discovery scene over the course of the last decades, we still lack a predictable tool when it comes to selecting compounds or cell lines for xenograft testing. What is lacking? Cellular models do not account for the challenges the compounds fac...

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War On Cancer 2018: targeted therapies in oncology WAR ON CANCER 2018: TARGETED THERAPIES IN ONCOLOGY

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Drug Target Review attended War On Cancer 2018 in London yesterday. Industry representatives, service providers, policymakers, clinicians and patients all took part in the event. During the Breakthrough Therapies and the Technology for Treatment in 2020 strategy session, the panel spoke of the futur...

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New information on the pathological mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease NEW INFORMATION ON THE PATHOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Alzheimer’s disease is associated with two neuropathologies: amyloid plaques and tau aggregates, or tau protein accumulated in neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Brain amyloid plaques are the better-known pathology, but the significance of tau to disease progression is equally important.

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How you react to stress may predict brain health HOW YOU REACT TO STRESS MAY PREDICT BRAIN HEALTH

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

New research finds that our response to even minor daily stressors, such as getting stuck in traffic or queuing for too long at the supermarket, can affect how healthy our brain is, particularly into old age. Prolonged chronic stress can lead to a wide range of adverse health consequences, from...

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Drug Could Seek New Approach For Autoimmunity DRUG COULD SEEK NEW APPROACH FOR AUTOIMMUNITY

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

From a failed pain drug, a protein called ‘BH4’, was recently discovered to have surprising implications in the treatment of autoimmunity and cancer. It was specifically found that BH4 functions as a kind of “immunological thermostat” capable of raising and lowering the activ...

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'BOOMERANGING' BACK HOME HURTS YOUNG ADULTS' MENTAL HEALTH

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

The number of young adults living in their own household has dropped dramatically in the last decades in the United States for a number of economic and social reasons. In a study that will soon be published in the peer-reviewed journal Society and Mental Health, MPIDR researcher Jennifer Caputo inve...

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A World First in 3D Medical Imaging A WORLD FIRST IN 3D MEDICAL IMAGING

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

EXPLORER, the world’s first medical imaging scanner that can capture a 3D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans. The brainchild of UC Davis scientists Simon Cherry and Ramsey Badawi, EXPLORER is a combined positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed to...

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What does autism look like in the brain? WHAT DOES AUTISM LOOK LIKE IN THE BRAIN?

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

People on the autism spectrum often dislike exposure to unexpected stimuli, but why is that? New research takes a look at what happens in the brain, and how that relates to a person's ability to tolerate exposure to various stimuli. "People with autism do not like unexpected stimuli, a...

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Muscular paralysis progression could be reduced using tamoxifen MUSCULAR PARALYSIS PROGRESSION COULD BE REDUCED USING TAMOXIFEN

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland – working in collaboration with the University of Stras...

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One-third of US parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids this season ONE-THIRD OF US PARENTS PLAN TO SKIP FLU SHOTS FOR THEIR KIDS THIS SEASON

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

Thirty-four percent of US parents said their child was unlikely to get the flu vaccine this year, according to a report published Monday by C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. The online poll, which was administered in October, looked at 1,977 parents who had at least one child, whether parents wou...

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Anti-vaccine community behind North Carolina chickenpox outbreak ANTI-VACCINE COMMUNITY BEHIND NORTH CAROLINA CHICKENPOX OUTBREAK

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

On Friday 36 students at Asheville Waldorf School were diagnosed with the disease, the Asheville Citizen-Times newspaper reported. The school has one of the state’s highest rates of religious exemption, allowing students to skip vaccination. US health officials say vaccinating is far safer tha...

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Inflammation inhibitor could be used to treat sepsis INFLAMMATION INHIBITOR COULD BE USED TO TREAT SEPSIS

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a new inhibitor which decreases lung inflammation and could hold the key to treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome – a life-threatening disease which affects thousands of people in the UK. In the pioneering research, an internat...

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The new technique to simultaneously target fibroblasts while killing cancer cells THE NEW TECHNIQUE TO SIMULTANEOUSLY TARGET FIBROBLASTS WHILE KILLING CANCER CELLS

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumors – healthy cells that are tricked i...

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The long-term outcomes of breast implants studied THE LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF BREAST IMPLANTS STUDIED

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

The largest study of breast implants to date provides women with some important information regarding rare but serious adverse outcomes. A breast implant is a prosthesis used to change the size or shape of a woman's breast. Some women use breast implants to feel more comfortable in their bodies,...

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