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Who Decided We Needed to Take Vitamins? WHO DECIDED WE NEEDED TO TAKE VITAMINS?

video

Dec 13, 2018

Today, vitamins and supplements have grown to a $68 billion dollar global industry, a $13 billion market in the United States alone, and while we’ve made leaps and bounds in understanding the effect vitamins have on our systems, consumers still...

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Ingestible capsule controlled wirelessly could treat diseases INGESTIBLE CAPSULE CONTROLLED WIRELESSLY COULD TREAT DISEASES

blog article

Dec 13, 2018

Researchers at MIT, Draper, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. The capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, ...

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Lessons learned and best practices from the Polio Eradication Programme in Nigeria LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES FROM THE POLIO ERADICATION PROGRAMME IN NIGERIA

blog article

Dec 13, 2018

A new supplement from the World Health Organization published in BMC Public Health explores the Polio Eradication Programme in Nigeria. Because Nigeria accounts for almost half of the global burden of wild poliovirus (WPV), this important supplement ...

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Red meat raises heart disease risk through gut bacteria RED MEAT RAISES HEART DISEASE RISK THROUGH GUT BACTERIA

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

Scientists have uncovered further evidence of how a diet rich in red meat interacts with gut bacteria to raise the risk of heart disease. They found that people who ate red meat as their main source of protein for 1 month had levels of trimethyl...

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Artificial Intelligence And The Future Of Medicine ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

Washington University researchers are working to develop artificial intelligence (AI) systems for health care, which have the potential to transform the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, helping to ensure that patients get the right treatment at t...

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Disease Risk Seen In Disrupted Biological Clock DISEASE RISK SEEN IN DISRUPTED BIOLOGICAL CLOCK

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

USC scientists report that a novel time-keeping mechanism within liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. This dual function of the nuclear receptor protein HNF4A offers a potenti...

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Tackling societal inequalities and institutional discrimination in mental health systems TACKLING SOCIETAL INEQUALITIES AND INSTITUTIONAL DISCRIMINATION IN MENTAL HEALTH SYSTEMS

blog article

Dec 12, 2018

A recently published BMC Medicine article investigates the inherent inequality in the mental health service care received by patients from minority ethnic groups. Here, Dr. Kamaldeep Bhui discusses his team's findings. Health systems exist w...

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Harmful sugar pills? HARMFUL SUGAR PILLS?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Research published today in Trials explores the negative effects that can be caused by participants being administered placebos in clinical trials, finding that half of the people taking placebos reported side effects from the trial intervention. Her...

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What to know about stage 4 lymphoma WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT STAGE 4 LYMPHOMA

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Stage 4 lymphoma occurs when cancer has spread to a distant part of the body outside of the lymphatic system, such as the spinal cord, lungs, or liver. Lymphoma is cancer that originates in a type of white blood cell called lymphocytes. These cells t...

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Doctors love golf: Fact or fiction? DOCTORS LOVE GOLF: FACT OR FICTION?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

A long-lived stereotype about doctors is that they are avid golf players. In a new study, featured in the Christmas issue of The BMJ, specialists from the Harvard Medical School tackle this common belief head-on. Every year in the holiday season...

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Coffee Compounds Could Team Up to Fight Parkinson’s? COFFEE COMPOUNDS COULD TEAM UP TO FIGHT PARKINSON’S?

blog article

Dec 11, 2018

Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia - two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration. The discovery, recently p...

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Single-tablet regimens for HIV SINGLE-TABLET REGIMENS FOR HIV

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Healthcare providers can treat HIV using antiretroviral therapy. A person may need to take several tablets a day or a single pill that contains multiple drugs. In this article, we look at the benefits of single-tablet regimens (STRs). We also provide...

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What is the link between HPV and HIV? WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN HPV AND HIV?

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

HPV and HIV are both viruses that cause sexually transmitted infections. The viruses cause different conditions, though people with HIV are more susceptible to HPV than others. People with untreated HIV are more likely to have active HPV infections a...

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Future of Alzheimer FUTURE OF ALZHEIMER'S THERAPY: WHAT IS THE BEST APPROACH?

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Millions of people worldwide live with a form of dementia, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Currently, there is no way to halt its progress, but clinical trials of new drugs are underway. What approach will serve specialists best?...

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Tau Should be Pursued as Alzheimer TAU SHOULD BE PURSUED AS ALZHEIMER'S BIOMARKER IN BLOOD, RESEARCHERS SAY

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Today, the only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer's disease in life is through brain scans and tests of cerebrospinal fluid that must be collected via lumbar puncture. Though cumbersome and expensive, such tests provide the most accurate dia...

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Repurposing wasp venom as antibiotic drugs REPURPOSING WASP VENOM AS ANTIBIOTIC DRUGS

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic to humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs. After performing a systematic study of the...

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Parkinson PARKINSON'S: DIETARY COMPOUND MOVES TOXIC PROTEIN FROM GUT TO BRAIN

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

A recent study in rats reveals that a now-banned herbicide and a common food-derived chemical can work together to produce symptoms similar to those present in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition. Brain c...

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Ayurvedic Medicine For Acidity AYURVEDIC MEDICINE FOR ACIDITY

blog article

Dec 10, 2018

Have you ever felt a burning sensation in your chest or nauseous after a meal? Well, you’re not alone. Over 16% of the Indian urban population face the same. Acidity, also known as Acid Reflux, is the culprit behind. It is one of the most commo...

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Who is most likely to experience WHO IS MOST LIKELY TO EXPERIENCE 'HANGXIETY?'

blog article

Dec 09, 2018

New research has found that very shy people are more likely to have anxiety, possibly at debilitating levels, during a hangover. The findings also suggest that for these people, "hangxiety" might signal a higher risk of alcohol dependence.&...

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This form of brain training may help treat severe schizophrenia THIS FORM OF BRAIN TRAINING MAY HELP TREAT SEVERE SCHIZOPHRENIA

blog article

Dec 09, 2018

New research has revealed that targeted cognitive training can successfully reduce cognitive impairment in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is one of the 15 leading causes of disability globally. In the United States, this condition a...

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A new blood test could help diagnose Alzheimer A NEW BLOOD TEST COULD HELP DIAGNOSE ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Dec 08, 2018

Doctors may find it hard to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before the obvious symptoms set in, and many of the current tests for it are expensive and complicated. However, researchers recently devised a blood test that could accurately detect this ...

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Is it possible to reverse IS IT POSSIBLE TO REVERSE 'CHEMO BRAIN?'

blog article

Dec 08, 2018

Chemotherapy can affect a person's brain for years after coming to an end. How does it actually change the brain, and is there anything that scientists can do to reverse these effects? Many people who undergo chemotherapy will notice cogniti...

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What too much sleep can do to your health WHAT TOO MUCH SLEEP CAN DO TO YOUR HEALTH

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

New research finds that both insufficient and excessive sleep may raise the risk of cardiovascular problems and premature death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that a third of the United States population does not get eno...

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Diabetes: Fasting before a blood test might actually be harmful DIABETES: FASTING BEFORE A BLOOD TEST MIGHT ACTUALLY BE HARMFUL

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

Before a blood cholesterol test, doctors typically advise that a person fasts for several hours to get the most accurate results. However, a new study shows that in the case of people with diabetes, this approach could do more harm than good. Pe...

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Maternal filarial infection impacts childhood susceptibility to infection MATERNAL FILARIAL INFECTION IMPACTS CHILDHOOD SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFECTION

blog article

Dec 07, 2018

The WHO’s Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis aims to eliminate this Neglected Tropical Disease through mass drug administration programs. Pregnant women and children under the age of 2 are currently not eligible to be part of this...

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Providing Supervised Medical-Grade Heroin To Heavy Users Can Reduce Harms PROVIDING SUPERVISED MEDICAL-GRADE HEROIN TO HEAVY USERS CAN REDUCE HARMS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Providing supervised access to medical-grade heroin to people whose use continues after trying multiple traditional treatments has been successful in other countries and should be piloted and studied in the United States, according to a new RAND Corp...

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Infections and cancer: The link could be stronger than we think INFECTIONS AND CANCER: THE LINK COULD BE STRONGER THAN WE THINK

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Bacteria could have a bigger involvement in cancer than scientists may have realized, according to recent research. A study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore has uncovered a type of bacterial infection that can disrupt D...

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The psychological impact of intensive care THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF INTENSIVE CARE

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

A period in intensive care is known to negatively affect patients' long-term physical, cognitive and psychiatric health, in what's known as post-intensive care syndrome. Researchers from the University of Oxford sought to reveal the impact of...

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Prenatal Exposure To Chemicals In Personal Care Products May Speed Puberty In Girls PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS IN PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS MAY SPEED PUBERTY IN GIRLS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap, and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study led by researchers at UC Berkeley. The results, which were published D...

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15 Low Glycemic Index Foods Indian Diabetics Can Eat 15 LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX FOODS INDIAN DIABETICS CAN EAT

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

Low Glycemic Index Foods are a great option for the increasing number of diabetics in India. As more and more members of the younger generations are getting affected, it is important to know that though Diabetes does not have a cure it can be well ma...

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Frequent Urination: Causes and Ayurvedic Treatment FREQUENT URINATION: CAUSES AND AYURVEDIC TREATMENT

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

The normal frequency of urination varies from 4-7 times to 6- 10 times a day for each individual. Frequent urination is the condition where you tend to pass urine more frequently than what’s normal for you. It may occur either only during night...

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OCD: Brain mechanism explains symptoms OCD: BRAIN MECHANISM EXPLAINS SYMPTOMS

blog article

Dec 06, 2018

A large review of existing neuroscientific studies unravels the brain circuits and mechanisms that underpin obsessive-compulsive disorder. The researchers hope that the new findings will make existing therapies more effective, "or guide new trea...

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What role do brain lipids play in Parkinson WHAT ROLE DO BRAIN LIPIDS PLAY IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE?

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

New research looks to brain lipids to identify a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects about half a million people in the United States, according to the National Ins...

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Universal 10-minute cancer test in sight UNIVERSAL 10-MINUTE CANCER TEST IN SIGHT

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

Scientists have created an experimental test that can detect cancer in less than 10 minutes. The test uses a DNA feature that seems to be common to all types of cancer and does not occur in healthy tissue. A team at the University of Queensland ...

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Potential Seen For Tailoring Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment POTENTIAL SEEN FOR TAILORING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA TREATMENT

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

Advances in rapid screening of leukemia cells for drug susceptibility and resistance are bringing scientists closer to patient-tailored treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Research on the drug responses of leukemia stem cells may reveal why s...

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New approach turns immune cells into tiny anti-tumour drug factories NEW APPROACH TURNS IMMUNE CELLS INTO TINY ANTI-TUMOUR DRUG FACTORIES

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

In lab and mouse experiments researchers have developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs. Cancer immunotherapy efforts to better arm a patient’s own immune system to attack tumors has show...

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Frazzled receptors could be drug targets for treating major diseases FRAZZLED RECEPTORS COULD BE DRUG TARGETS FOR TREATING MAJOR DISEASES

blog article

Dec 05, 2018

A family of receptors, known as Frizzleds could be used to target numerous disease, including cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Karolinska Institute researchers in Sweden identified how the receptors are activated in cell membranes and a...

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Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities GUT MICROBIOME DIFFERS AMONG ETHNICITIES

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Research increasingly links the gut microbiome to a range of human maladies, including inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, and even cancer. Attempts to manipulate the gut with food rich in healthy bacteria, such as yogurt or kombucha, are in vogue,...

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These 10 essential oils can kill persistent Lyme disease THESE 10 ESSENTIAL OILS CAN KILL PERSISTENT LYME DISEASE

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Research just published in the journal Antibiotics shows that a range of essential oils can effectively kill persistent forms of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is an infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi), which is transm...

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Researchers find new drug combo to challenge cancer RESEARCHERS FIND NEW DRUG COMBO TO CHALLENGE CANCER

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Researchers have discovered that a particular drug combination may have a more significant effect against melanoma, a type of cancer that typically occurs in the skin, than other medications. According to recent studies, one of the best ways of ...

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Are statins overprescribed for cardiovascular disease prevention? ARE STATINS OVERPRESCRIBED FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION?

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

For millions of people who take statins to prevent the onset of cardiovascular disease, the potential harms of the cholesterol-lowering medication may outweigh the benefits. So concludes a recent modeling study from the University of Zurich in S...

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Essential oils from garlic and other herbs kill ‘persister’ Lyme disease bacteria. ESSENTIAL OILS FROM GARLIC AND OTHER HERBS KILL ‘PERSISTER’ LYME DISEASE BACTERIA.

blog article

Dec 04, 2018

Oils from garlic and several other common herbs and medicinal plants show strong activity against the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. These oils may be especi...

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Healthy Breakfast Foods That Have More Sugar Than Donuts HEALTHY BREAKFAST FOODS THAT HAVE MORE SUGAR THAN DONUTS

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Dec 03, 2018

How much sugar is in the averaged glazed donut? How does a donut’s sugar content compare to that of other ‘healthier’ breakfast foods like yogurt or oatmeal?

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What Causes Dry Eyes and How to Manage it With Ayurveda! WHAT CAUSES DRY EYES AND HOW TO MANAGE IT WITH AYURVEDA!

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

Dry eye is a condition where there is an inadequate production of tears in your eyes leading to irritation. Even the decrease in the quality of tears also leads to dry eyes. It is termed as keratoconjunctivitis. Aging and menopause. Certain medicatio...

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How to Break Uric Acid Build Up the Ayurvedic Way! HOW TO BREAK URIC ACID BUILD UP THE AYURVEDIC WAY!

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

Some of the food we eat contains purines and when these purines are broken down in our bodies, uric acid is produced. Though uric acid is helpful in little amounts, the build-up of uric acid leads to gout as the kidneys are unable to flush it out eff...

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App Aims to Encourage At-Home HIV Testing APP AIMS TO ENCOURAGE AT-HOME HIV TESTING

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

HIV self-testing strategies have been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2016, as they empower people to find out HIV their status at their convenience. Home-based testing kits have yet to be approved for sale in Canada. However...

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The Gut - Mixing Pot for Antibiotic Resistance Genes THE GUT - MIXING POT FOR ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES

blog article

Dec 03, 2018

A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut. The human gut is home to trillions of microorgan...

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Alzheimer’s Vaccine Shows Promising Results ALZHEIMER’S VACCINE SHOWS PROMISING RESULTS

video

Dec 02, 2018

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most well-known and most common type of age-related dementia. Amyloid deposition and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein are both pathological hallmarks of the AD. Using a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD) ...

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Shifting the Treatment Paradigm in Blood Cancers: New Insights SHIFTING THE TREATMENT PARADIGM IN BLOOD CANCERS: NEW INSIGHTS

blog article

Dec 01, 2018

For decades, the approach to treating diseases like acute leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma was based on assigning patients to prognostic groups and making uniform treatment decisions within that group. But with comprehensive genomic profiling, we can ...

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Gene Therapy: A Paradigm Shift in Medicine GENE THERAPY: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN MEDICINE

whitepaper

Nov 30, 2018

Gene therapy, the modification of genetic information in living cells to address a mutated gene, has the ability to dramatically change the way diseases are treated, or even cured. First conceptualized in the early 1970s, the seminal paper on the sub...

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Targeting breast cancer cell signaling molecules PI3K and Akt by phytochemicals Cannabidiol, Nimbin and Acetogenin TARGETING BREAST CANCER CELL SIGNALING MOLECULES PI3K AND AKT BY PHYTOCHEMICALS CANNABIDIOL, NIMBIN AND ACETOGENIN

whitepaper

Nov 30, 2018

The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/serine-threonine protein kinase Akt is a vital signaling cascade involved in cell survival, progression and thus causes various types of cancers. Various kinase inhibitors targeting PI3K/Akt have been extensiv...

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Discovering Druggable Targets DISCOVERING DRUGGABLE TARGETS

blog article

Nov 30, 2018

We recently spoke to Dr. Kilian V. M. Huber from the Structural Genomics Consortium & Target Discovery Institute, University of Oxford, to find out – ‘What makes a good target?’. Kilian touches on the research being conducted at...

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Single-Cell DNA Sequencing Platform Weaves a Way Towards Personalized Cancer Treatment SINGLE-CELL DNA SEQUENCING PLATFORM WEAVES A WAY TOWARDS PERSONALIZED CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Nov 30, 2018

High-throughput single-cell analysis has been regularly acclaimed as a transformative technology for sequencing and a huge step towards the goal of personalized medicine. Over the last few years, a series of applications and techniques have been tout...

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Target Identification & Validation in Drug Discovery TARGET IDENTIFICATION & VALIDATION IN DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Nov 29, 2018

The key to good drug design is working out and capturing the clinical spectrum of disease and the exact role a potential therapeutic target plays in the disease. In the words of the German researcher, Paul Ehrlich, known for his countless contributio...

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Low back pain: Pulsed radiofrequency may be the answer LOW BACK PAIN: PULSED RADIOFREQUENCY MAY BE THE ANSWER

blog article

Nov 29, 2018

A new study reveals that pulsed radiofrequency may help patients with low back pain that has not responded to conservative therapy. Low back pain affects millions of people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ...

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Personalized: Lung cancer’s present offers a glimpse at cancer’s future PERSONALIZED: LUNG CANCER’S PRESENT OFFERS A GLIMPSE AT CANCER’S FUTURE

blog article

Nov 28, 2018

The impact of precision medicine on cancer treatment becomes more apparent each day. If you consider the patient experience, you start to see how much has changed already and how much more is possible. When I began caring for patients with non-small ...

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5 Self-Care Gifts for Yourself 5 SELF-CARE GIFTS FOR YOURSELF

blog article

Nov 27, 2018

We take care of our cars, our homes, our jobs, our children, and the many people we love. Why then can it be so difficult to give ourselves the care and attention we also need and deserve? For some, self-care may feel selfish or even frivolous. As we...

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Freeze-dried vaccine may help eradicate polio FREEZE-DRIED VACCINE MAY HELP ERADICATE POLIO

blog article

Nov 27, 2018

USC researchers have developed a polio vaccine that doesn’t require refrigeration, meaning it could someday be used all over the world to deliver the final blow to this longtime foe. The injectable vaccine, which was freeze-dried into a powder,...

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8 Effective Ayurvedic Hair Oils To Prevent Hair Fall and Premature Graying of Hair 8 EFFECTIVE AYURVEDIC HAIR OILS TO PREVENT HAIR FALL AND PREMATURE GRAYING OF HAIR

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

One of these Ayurvedic hair oils is certainly going to prevent hair fall and rescue your hair! Hair fall and thinning hair, baldness, dandruff and scalp problems, split ends and premature graying of hair are common hair problems. If you suffer from a...

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How Telehealth Is Changing the Healthcare Industry HOW TELEHEALTH IS CHANGING THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY

infographic

Nov 26, 2018

The switch to telehealth shows no signs of slowing down. In a recent survey from March 2018, data was collected from 329 behavioral health providers across all 50 states; the survey found that nearly half (48%) of respondents now regularly use telehe...

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'DNA ORIGAMI' TACKLES MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT CANCER CELLS

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

A DNA tool that combines gene therapy with chemotherapy could be a promising new way to defeat multidrug-resistant cancer cells. The tool is a "tailored DNA nanoplatform" that can carry chemotherapy drugs into targeted cancer cells while al...

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One-Pot Reactions: Synthesizing Natural Product Analogs for Drug Discovery ONE-POT REACTIONS: SYNTHESIZING NATURAL PRODUCT ANALOGS FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Scientists, led by Prof. Taleb H. Al-Tel, at the University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates have discovered powerful new reactions for the diastereo- and enantio-selective synthesis of nature-inspired privileged structures – one-pot, mod...

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Breast Tumors Boost Their Growth by Recruiting Cells Formed in the Bone Marrow BREAST TUMORS BOOST THEIR GROWTH BY RECRUITING CELLS FORMED IN THE BONE MARROW

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Researchers in Israel have discovered that breast tumors can boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells originally formed in the bone marrow. The study, which will be published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the...

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Impaired Transmission of Cellular Force - Culprit in Valvular Heart Disease IMPAIRED TRANSMISSION OF CELLULAR FORCE - CULPRIT IN VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

About three percent of the world’s population is affected by valvular heart diseases. It is also the most common cause of heart surgery, as no drug-based treatment is available. Recent research has shed light on the molecular mechanism on the v...

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Do cancer treatments accelerate brain aging? DO CANCER TREATMENTS ACCELERATE BRAIN AGING?

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Cancer treatments can work, but the same factors that help them eradicate tumors may also accelerate aging processes in the body especially the brain. New research explores. Previously on Medical News Today, we covered a study explaining that an...

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Sperm SPERM'S INBUILT HOMING DEVICE

blog article

Nov 26, 2018

Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target o...

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How to Recognize Malaria Symptoms HOW TO RECOGNIZE MALARIA SYMPTOMS

video

Nov 25, 2018

Malaria is a blood-borne disease caused by a parasite, which is transmitted via the bite of infected mosquitoes.1 While malaria is uncommon in developed countries and temperate climates in general, its still prevalent and often deadly in developing t...

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Current Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease CURRENT THERAPEUTIC TARGETS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

whitepaper

Nov 25, 2018

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most common multifactorial diseases, including a range of abnormal cellular/molecular processes occurring in different regions of the brain. This disease is considered to be a major contributor to dementia...

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Vitiligo Treatment in Ayurveda With Bakuchi And Correct Diet VITILIGO TREATMENT IN AYURVEDA WITH BAKUCHI AND CORRECT DIET

blog article

Nov 25, 2018

Learn about Vitiligo treatment in Ayurveda which can help you get back to normal health. Vitiligo (or Leucoderma / white patches / Switra / Safed Daag)  is a skin pigmentation disorder occurring due to the death of melanocytes, resulting in loss...

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UT Researchers Discover Alzheimer UT RESEARCHERS DISCOVER ALZHEIMER'S VACCINE, HOPE TO TEST IN HUMANS SOON

video

Nov 24, 2018

UT Researchers Discover Alzheimer's Vaccine, Hope To Test In Humans Soon. Researchers at the University of Texas (UT) reported Tuesday that they have developed a vaccine that could arm the body to attack Alzheimer's plaques

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23 Easy Home Remedies for Kidney Stones 23 EASY HOME REMEDIES FOR KIDNEY STONES

blog article

Nov 24, 2018

Kidneys perform the important task of removing waste products and excess fluids from our body through urine.  They are instrumental in maintaining the chemical balance of our bodies.  It goes without saying, therefore, that healthy kidneys ...

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Knee Pain: Latest Treatment Options KNEE PAIN: LATEST TREATMENT OPTIONS

video

Nov 23, 2018

Knee osteoarthritis is very common, especially as people age. It happens when the cartilage that cushions the knee joint starts to wear down. That can happen as you get older or because of an old injury or other stresses on the joints.

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Vanderbilt researchers isolate antibody that can neutralize West Nile virus VANDERBILT RESEARCHERS ISOLATE ANTIBODY THAT CAN NEUTRALIZE WEST NILE VIRUS

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have isolated a human monoclonal antibody that can “neutralize” the West Nile virus and potentially prevent a leading cause of viral encephalitis (brain inflammation) in t...

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5 Dangerous Causes and Home Remedies of Diabetic Neuropathy 5 DANGEROUS CAUSES AND HOME REMEDIES OF DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Are you diabetic and need help to fight diabetic neuropathy? Ayurvedic treatment for diabetic neuropathy is one of the most underrated yet powerful treatments available. Do you feel numbness and tingling in your hands and legs often? If these symptom...

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Virtual Tour of GSK Asia House VIRTUAL TOUR OF GSK ASIA HOUSE

video

Nov 23, 2018

GSK is a global leading healthcare company with an extensive presence across the Asia Pacific and the regional headquarters reflects our long-standing commitment to the region. When you explore the different workspaces in GSK Asia House through this ...

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Brain health: Low-protein, high-carb diet just as good as low-calorie diet BRAIN HEALTH: LOW-PROTEIN, HIGH-CARB DIET JUST AS GOOD AS LOW-CALORIE DIET

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

New research, published in the journal Cell Reports, suggests that a low-protein, high-carb diet may be an easier alternative to calorie restriction for people looking to preserve brain health and prevent cognitive decline. As the world's populat...

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New blood test can detect ovarian cancer in its early stages NEW BLOOD TEST CAN DETECT OVARIAN CANCER IN ITS EARLY STAGES

blog article

Nov 23, 2018

Relatively few cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed in their early stages, so many people lose the opportunity for effective treatment. A newly developed blood test, however, could change this situation. The American Cancer Society (ACS) state that ...

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Transforming health services delivery towards people-centered health systems TRANSFORMING HEALTH SERVICES DELIVERY TOWARDS PEOPLE-CENTERED HEALTH SYSTEMS

whitepaper

Nov 22, 2018

The briefing note at hand has been prepared to annotate with further conceptual clarity the structure and organization of the Framework for Action, with the objective of specifying the following: its strategic vision according to the determinants of ...

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4 Future Trends in Medicine 4 FUTURE TRENDS IN MEDICINE

infographic

Nov 22, 2018

The world of medicine is continually impacted by updates in technology, new scientific research, and healthcare reform initiatives, according to a new infographic by docwire. The infographic examines four future trends that are impacting the hea...

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Endometriosis is Treatable – Here’s Your Guide to Ayurvedic Treatment for Endometriosis ENDOMETRIOSIS IS TREATABLE – HERE’S YOUR GUIDE TO AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR ENDOMETRIOSIS

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Endometriosis is a painful gynecological disorder. But it is Treatable. Endometriosis is a disorder in which the tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus grows outside your uterus. In endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues ...

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Obesity: Researchers identify 4 subtypes OBESITY: RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY 4 SUBTYPES

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Researchers have called obesity an epidemic, and many are working hard to develop a solution. But is there a single answer? New research suggests that obesity takes different shapes and that the same approach will not work for everyone. Speciali...

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Why does psoriasis increase diabetes risk? WHY DOES PSORIASIS INCREASE DIABETES RISK?

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Previous research demonstrated that having psoriasis increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A new study has tried to understand why this occurs. Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin condition, affecting an estimated 2.2 percent of peopl...

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Breast Cancer Drug BREAST CANCER DRUG 'TAMOXIFEN' BRINGS HOPE TO MUSCLE DISEASE

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Tamoxifen is currently a drug used in the treatment of breast cancer and has been used in patients for many years. Now, the latest research has indicated that Tamoxifen may hold the potential in treating another disease myotubular myopathy by slowing...

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Could managing cholesterol prevent Alzheimer COULD MANAGING CHOLESTEROL PREVENT ALZHEIMER'S?

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

The largest genetic study of Alzheimer's disease to date finds that a "handful of gene variants" increases some people's risk of both dementia and cardiovascular disease. The findings imply that, in principle, we may be able to repu...

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This is how your brain predicts future events THIS IS HOW YOUR BRAIN PREDICTS FUTURE EVENTS

blog article

Nov 22, 2018

Brains learn how to anticipate future occurrences from patterns. This process is called "anticipatory timing," and it allows us to successfully interact with the world around us. How does it work? Anticipatory timing is, in part, what allow...

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Drug Screening: Cellular proliferation assay performed inside a mouse DRUG SCREENING: CELLULAR PROLIFERATION ASSAY PERFORMED INSIDE A MOUSE

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Although many new cellular assays entered the drug discovery scene over the course of the last decades, we still lack a predictable tool when it comes to selecting compounds or cell lines for xenograft testing. What is lacking? Cellular models d...

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6 Recommended Practices for Strengthening Care Transitions 6 RECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR STRENGTHENING CARE TRANSITIONS

infographic

Nov 21, 2018

Poorly coordinated care transitions from hospitals to other care settings contribute to avoidable healthcare costs, according to a new infographic by Cureatr. The infographic examines six best practices for improving care transitions.

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Alzheimer ALZHEIMER'S VACCINE DRAWS CLOSER

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Building on decades of research, a new paper brings us one step closer to a vaccine that targets the neurological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Prevention may soon be possible. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is a d...

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Melanoma: Keeping these molecules apart could stop cancer spread MELANOMA: KEEPING THESE MOLECULES APART COULD STOP CANCER SPREAD

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

The interaction between two particular molecules may be the reason why melanoma tumors grow and are likely to spread to other parts of the body. This is the conclusion that researchers at the University of Tokyo in Japan reached after studying these ...

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Drug Could Seek New Approach For Autoimmunity DRUG COULD SEEK NEW APPROACH FOR AUTOIMMUNITY

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

From a failed pain drug, a protein called ‘BH4’, was recently discovered to have surprising implications in the treatment of autoimmunity and cancer. It was specifically found that BH4 functions as a kind of “immunological thermosta...

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Expanding Access to Our Medicines EXPANDING ACCESS TO OUR MEDICINES

video

Nov 21, 2018

Every day, 1,000 young women and girls get HIV, 4,000 lives are lost to TB and millions who could be helped suffer from serious mental illnesses. Johnson & Johnson's efforts in tackling these health threats, alongside many others, is why the ...

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How you react to stress may predict brain health HOW YOU REACT TO STRESS MAY PREDICT BRAIN HEALTH

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

New research finds that our response to even minor daily stressors, such as getting stuck in traffic or queuing for too long at the supermarket, can affect how healthy our brain is, particularly into old age. Prolonged chronic stress can lead to...

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New information on the pathological mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease NEW INFORMATION ON THE PATHOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Alzheimer’s disease is associated with two neuropathologies: amyloid plaques and tau aggregates, or tau protein accumulated in neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Brain amyloid plaques are the better-known pathology, but the significance of tau...

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War On Cancer 2018: targeted therapies in oncology WAR ON CANCER 2018: TARGETED THERAPIES IN ONCOLOGY

blog article

Nov 21, 2018

Drug Target Review attended War On Cancer 2018 in London yesterday. Industry representatives, service providers, policymakers, clinicians and patients all took part in the event. During the Breakthrough Therapies and the Technology for Treatment in 2...

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Ebola Outbreak "Far From Over" in DRC EBOLA OUTBREAK "FAR FROM OVER" IN DRC

video

Nov 20, 2018

The current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is the largest ever recorded in that country, and it's proving especially difficult to curtail. Here, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tropical med...

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Anti-vaccine community behind North Carolina chickenpox outbreak ANTI-VACCINE COMMUNITY BEHIND NORTH CAROLINA CHICKENPOX OUTBREAK

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

On Friday 36 students at Asheville Waldorf School were diagnosed with the disease, the Asheville Citizen-Times newspaper reported. The school has one of the state’s highest rates of religious exemption, allowing students to skip vaccination. US...

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One-third of US parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids this season ONE-THIRD OF US PARENTS PLAN TO SKIP FLU SHOTS FOR THEIR KIDS THIS SEASON

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

Thirty-four percent of US parents said their child was unlikely to get the flu vaccine this year, according to a report published Monday by C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. The online poll, which was administered in October, looked at 1,977 paren...

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Muscular paralysis progression could be reduced using tamoxifen MUSCULAR PARALYSIS PROGRESSION COULD BE REDUCED USING TAMOXIFEN

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland – wor...

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What does autism look like in the brain? WHAT DOES AUTISM LOOK LIKE IN THE BRAIN?

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

People on the autism spectrum often dislike exposure to unexpected stimuli, but why is that? New research takes a look at what happens in the brain, and how that relates to a person's ability to tolerate exposure to various stimuli. "Pe...

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A World First in 3D Medical Imaging A WORLD FIRST IN 3D MEDICAL IMAGING

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

EXPLORER, the world’s first medical imaging scanner that can capture a 3D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans. The brainchild of UC Davis scientists Simon Cherry and Ramsey Badawi, EXPLORER is a combined positr...

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'BOOMERANGING' BACK HOME HURTS YOUNG ADULTS' MENTAL HEALTH

blog article

Nov 20, 2018

The number of young adults living in their own household has dropped dramatically in the last decades in the United States for a number of economic and social reasons. In a study that will soon be published in the peer-reviewed journal Society and Me...

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Preeclampsia symptoms alleviated by RNAi therapy PREECLAMPSIA SYMPTOMS ALLEVIATED BY RNAI THERAPY

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

A collaboration of scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Western Sydney University, has shown that an innovative new type of therapy using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) can temper th...

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The long-term outcomes of breast implants studied THE LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF BREAST IMPLANTS STUDIED

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

The largest study of breast implants to date provides women with some important information regarding rare but serious adverse outcomes. A breast implant is a prosthesis used to change the size or shape of a woman's breast. Some women use breast ...

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The new technique to simultaneously target fibroblasts while killing cancer cells THE NEW TECHNIQUE TO SIMULTANEOUSLY TARGET FIBROBLASTS WHILE KILLING CANCER CELLS

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within sol...

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Inflammation inhibitor could be used to treat sepsis INFLAMMATION INHIBITOR COULD BE USED TO TREAT SEPSIS

blog article

Nov 19, 2018

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a new inhibitor which decreases lung inflammation and could hold the key to treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome – a life-threatening disease which affects thousands of people ...

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ISAPP dispels myths about probiotics ISAPP DISPELS MYTHS ABOUT PROBIOTICS

infographic

Nov 18, 2018

Surf the web and you’ll find many claims about probiotics, but many times what’s said isn’t based on fact. Sometimes this is because the author just doesn’t know the science. Sometimes it seems to be intentional, to promote so...

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Why Do Some People Die in Their Sleep? WHY DO SOME PEOPLE DIE IN THEIR SLEEP?

video

Nov 18, 2018

Obstructive sleep apnea may exacerbate other medical conditions that may ultimately be fatal. These include strokes, heart attacks, heart failure, and arrhythmias that can all result in sudden death. It is possible to die from sleep behaviors called ...

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Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal MICROGEL POWDER FIGHTS INFECTION AND HELPS WOUNDS HEAL

blog article

Nov 18, 2018

Hao Meng’s doctoral project focused on biocompatibility testing and pulling a sticky amino acid out of mussels. Glue-like catechol shows promise for smart adhesives a small jolt of electricity can turn the stickiness on and off but that’s...

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Why Eating Too Much Sugar Is Causing Harmful Diseases In Kids WHY EATING TOO MUCH SUGAR IS CAUSING HARMFUL DISEASES IN KIDS

video

Nov 18, 2018

Robert Lustig, who is a professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of California at San Francisco, explains just how much our health has taken a turn for the worse since the '70s and the '80s. He discusses how children who are eat...

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What Goes Into Health Shakes? WHAT GOES INTO HEALTH SHAKES?

infographic

Nov 17, 2018

Want a way to start your day on the right track? Homemade fruit and vegetable juice smoothies could be just the thing to get you starting the day in a healthy way, with a huge range of different tasty and exotic combinations to try. This helpful smoo...

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National Service Framework for Diabetes NATIONAL SERVICE FRAMEWORK FOR DIABETES

whitepaper

Nov 17, 2018

Less than a hundred years ago diabetes was a death warrant. The discovery of insulin in The 1920s was a major breakthrough. Since then, thanks to the dedicated work of scientists, researchers, doctors, and nurses in this country and abroad, there hav...

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Home Remedies and Ayurvedic Treatment for Diabetes HOME REMEDIES AND AYURVEDIC TREATMENT FOR DIABETES

blog article

Nov 17, 2018

Prameha, according to Ayurveda is a group of urinary disorders. There are 20 types of urinary disorders (prameha) based on doshas. Among these 20 urinary disorders (prameha rogas), 4 are due to vata, 6 due to pitta and 10 due to kapha. Diabetes that ...

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Drug candidate offers hope of vocal improvement for ADNP syndrome DRUG CANDIDATE OFFERS HOPE OF VOCAL IMPROVEMENT FOR ADNP SYNDROME

blog article

Nov 16, 2018

Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes developmental delays, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder symptoms in thousands of children worldwide. There is no known remedy for th...

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Do you use music as a sleep aid? DO YOU USE MUSIC AS A SLEEP AID?

blog article

Nov 16, 2018

Sleep disorders are changes in sleep patterns that increase the risk of health problems and can impact a person's everyday quality of life. Symptoms of sleep disorders include difficulty falling asleep, daytime sleepiness, and excessive movement ...

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Inhibiting inflammation by blocking release of TNF alpha INHIBITING INFLAMMATION BY BLOCKING RELEASE OF TNF ALPHA

blog article

Nov 16, 2018

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that t...

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Sanofi Manufacturing System (SMS) SANOFI MANUFACTURING SYSTEM (SMS)

video

Nov 15, 2018

The Sanofi Manufacturing System (SMS) is the backbone that confers consistency and strength to Sanofi's wide network of production and distribution sites. It is a fully integrated ecosystem to manage the performance and cascade our strategy. We a...

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The Biggest Misconception About Lung Cancer THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT LUNG CANCER

video

Nov 15, 2018

Meet Juanita, a lung cancer patient, and non-smoker who dispels the biggest myth about the disease.

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Can multitasking boost rather than hinder performance? CAN MULTITASKING BOOST RATHER THAN HINDER PERFORMANCE?

blog article

Nov 15, 2018

Multitasking might be an illusion, but it is a helpful one. A new study, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that merely perceiving one or several activities as multitasking is enough t...

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Hot baths reduce inflammation, improve glucose metabolism HOT BATHS REDUCE INFLAMMATION, IMPROVE GLUCOSE METABOLISM

blog article

Nov 15, 2018

According to new research, a hot bath could have effects that extend way beyond mental relaxation. According to the authors, regular hot baths might reduce inflammation and improve metabolism. Over recent years, hot baths, saunas, and other so-called...

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Get Your Daily Dose of Vitamin D GET YOUR DAILY DOSE OF VITAMIN D

video

Nov 15, 2018

Vitamin D is absolutely essential for good health. Also known as the sunshine vitamin, it is made in your skin when exposed to sunlight. In spite of that, vitamin D deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the world. Up to 42% of...

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Using anti-malaria drugs to slow tumour growth USING ANTI-MALARIA DRUGS TO SLOW TUMOUR GROWTH

blog article

Nov 15, 2018

Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the Univer...

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A new approach to detecting cancer earlier from blood tests A NEW APPROACH TO DETECTING CANCER EARLIER FROM BLOOD TESTS

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy," epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at it...

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Together we can win the fight against malaria TOGETHER WE CAN WIN THE FIGHT AGAINST MALARIA

video

Nov 14, 2018

Marcel Tanner, Director em. Swiss TPH, President Swiss Academy of Sciences, talks about the big threats and how research and development of new drugs, surveillance and especially partnerships are crucial to reaching the target of ending malaria epide...

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Immune cell enzyme protects against tuberculosis IMMUNE CELL ENZYME PROTECTS AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

Using freshly resected lung tissue from 21 patients and two distinct mouse models, tuberculosis researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the Africa Health Research Institute, or AHRI, have identified a protein that plays an essentia...

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MS: When good brain cells turn bad MS: WHEN GOOD BRAIN CELLS TURN BAD

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

A new study is the first to suggest that the brain cells that multiple sclerosis attacks, called oligodendrocytes, may actually play a significant role in the development of the disease. The researchers behind this discovery are from the Karolin...

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Pancreatic cancer cells are PANCREATIC CANCER CELLS ARE 'ADDICTED' TO KEY PROTEIN

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

New research finds that the cancer cells in a particularly aggressive form of pancreatic cancer rely heavily on a key protein to grow and spread. The findings may soon lead to new treatments and prevention strategies. Pancreatic cancer is partic...

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Parkinson PARKINSON'S DISEASE: SCIENTISTS FIND NEW TARGET TO DESTROY PROTEIN CLUMPS

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

Blocking an enzyme could put a stop to the buildup of toxic protein clumps that occurs in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease. This was the conclusion that scientists at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) in Washington, D.C. re...

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Artificial intelligence decodes cancer pathology images ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE DECODES CANCER PATHOLOGY IMAGES

video

Nov 14, 2018

Novartis researchers are collaborating with tech startup PathAI to search for hidden information in pathology slides. For 150 years, pathologists have been looking through microscopes at tissue samples mounted on slides to diagnose cancer. Each ...

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New cancer drug safely boosts radiation therapy NEW CANCER DRUG SAFELY BOOSTS RADIATION THERAPY

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

A new clinical trial tests a radiotherapy-boosting drug in the fight against various forms of cancer. Cancer continues to be one of the top causes of death in the United States. According to the National Cancer Institute, there will be 1,735,350 new ...

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Combination of imaging techniques views retina in unprecedented detail COMBINATION OF IMAGING TECHNIQUES VIEWS RETINA IN UNPRECEDENTED DETAIL

blog article

Nov 14, 2018

By combining two imaging modalities-adaptive optics and angiography-investigators at the National Eye Institute (NEI) can see live neurons, epithelial cells, and blood vessels deep in the eye’s light-sensing retina. Resolving these tissues and ...

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A LC-MS Approach to Screen Drugs in Drug Consumption Rooms A LC-MS APPROACH TO SCREEN DRUGS IN DRUG CONSUMPTION ROOMS

whitepaper

Nov 13, 2018

In this study, the Toxtyper is used for drug screening in drug consumption rooms which are seen as an important element to minimize drug-related health problems (e.g. infection risk) and promote contact of drug users with employees of drug help progr...

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Innovations in Cancer Screening INNOVATIONS IN CANCER SCREENING

whitepaper

Nov 13, 2018

How advances in imaging technology and the use of artificial intelligence and analytics are improving the accuracy and cost of medical imaging for early cancer diagnosis, and increasing confidence in vital preventive screening programs.

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Lung cancer: An advocate’s perspective LUNG CANCER: AN ADVOCATE’S PERSPECTIVE

video

Nov 13, 2018

After being diagnosed with lung cancer 15 years ago, Tommy Bjork became an advocate for patients, supporting Lung Cancer Europe in their efforts to improve lung cancer care. Here he gives his perspective on lung cancer.

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Cancer and obesity: Clogged immune cells help explain link CANCER AND OBESITY: CLOGGED IMMUNE CELLS HELP EXPLAIN LINK

blog article

Nov 13, 2018

Obesity is a risk factor for cancer, but researchers are only now unfurling the exact mechanisms behind this connection. A new study looks at how obesity might scupper the immune system's ability to attack tumor cells. Obesity is at an all-time h...

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CRISPR used to prevent cancers tied to EBV and KSHV CRISPR USED TO PREVENT CANCERS TIED TO EBV AND KSHV

blog article

Nov 13, 2018

Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis–more commonly known as mono or the “kissing disease”–th...

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Be Immortal BE IMMORTAL

whitepaper

Nov 12, 2018

Immortality has long been treated as a work of fiction - a trait only possessed by mythological Gods and divine creatures. Is there an afterlife or life after death? Each religion or system of belief had its own way to deal with such questions. Certa...

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All about effective hair fall remedies ALL ABOUT EFFECTIVE HAIR FALL REMEDIES

blog article

Nov 12, 2018

Consistent and uncontrollable hair fall can be a nightmare for anybody. Experts say that normally we lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair quite imperceptibly every day. So that’s nothing to be worried about. But if you continue to lose large...

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WHAT HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE GDPR WHAT HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE GDPR

whitepaper

Nov 12, 2018

Data protection regulations define how an individual’s personal information can be used by organizations, businesses, and government. These regulations also contain safeguards that seek to ensure healthcare data is not susceptible to attack, mi...

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The Accenture Digital Health Technology Vision 2017 THE ACCENTURE DIGITAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY VISION 2017

whitepaper

Nov 12, 2018

Technology for People shows the way to an exciting future where healthcare technology is designed by humans, for humans, to create positive change that can transform healthcare organizations and society. Digital breakthroughs are enabling health...

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Vitamin D, fish oil supplements of little benefit to heart health VITAMIN D, FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTS OF LITTLE BENEFIT TO HEART HEALTH

blog article

Nov 12, 2018

Two new randomized trials challenge the view that vitamin D and fish oil supplements hold any real benefit in the fight against chronic conditions, such as cancer and heart disease. The results of the first and second trial were presented at Scientif...

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New way to manipulate immune cells may treat cancer, autoimmune disease NEW WAY TO MANIPULATE IMMUNE CELLS MAY TREAT CANCER, AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE

blog article

Nov 12, 2018

Scientists have uncovered a new way to curb autoimmunity and stimulate the body to fight cancer. The method uses a previously unknown druggable pathway to manipulate immune cells. The discovery concerns a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), wh...

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RIP1 kinase as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer RIP1 KINASE AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

blog article

Nov 12, 2018

Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have found that an experimental drug could be effective against a deadly form of pancreatic cancer when used in combination with immune-boosting therapies. Using mouse models and lab-grown human cells, the resear...

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Impedance Based Microfluidic Device for Measuring Drug Response of Cancer Cells IMPEDANCE BASED MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR MEASURING DRUG RESPONSE OF CANCER CELLS

infographic

Nov 11, 2018

Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the motion of polarizable particles that are suspended in an ionic solution and subjected to a spatially non-uniform electric field. Polarizability of a particle relative to the suspending medium determines the basic direct...

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Analysis and Compliance in Pharmaceuticals ANALYSIS AND COMPLIANCE IN PHARMACEUTICALS

whitepaper

Nov 10, 2018

Pharmaceuticals play a prominent role worldwide. This widespread presence is met with regulatory requirements at each phase of pharmaceutical development and manufacturing—from inspection of raw materials to quality control of final products. C...

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How to build and sustain a ‘capable’ healthcare system HOW TO BUILD AND SUSTAIN A ‘CAPABLE’ HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

whitepaper

Nov 10, 2018

What matters most when building and sustaining a healthcare organization? What are the precise levers to pull to promote physician well being, financial success, and better outcomes at lower cost? To answer these questions, Athena health launched an ...

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Scalpel-Free Surgery Enhances Quality Of Life For Parkinson’s Patients SCALPEL-FREE SURGERY ENHANCES QUALITY OF LIFE FOR PARKINSON’S PATIENTS

blog article

Nov 10, 2018

A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson’s disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found. Further, the University of Virginia School...

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2017 Clinical Trials Roundup The Evolution Continues 2017 CLINICAL TRIALS ROUNDUP THE EVOLUTION CONTINUES

whitepaper

Nov 08, 2018

The landscape of clinical trials continues to evolve over time as scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations emerge, which continue to be tracked by assessing recently initiated trials through Trialtrove’s annual Clinical Trials Rou...

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New Single-Dose Antibiotic Safe And Effective For Uncomplicated Gonorrhea NEW SINGLE-DOSE ANTIBIOTIC SAFE AND EFFECTIVE FOR UNCOMPLICATED GONORRHEA

blog article

Nov 08, 2018

A phase 2 clinical trial led by Stephanie N. Taylor, MD, Professor of Medicine and Microbiology in the Section of Infectious Diseases at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that a new antibiotic effectively treats uncomplicated uroge...

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BROADENING THE DEFINITION OF TOLERABILITY IN CANCER CLINICAL TRIALS TO BETTER MEASURE THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE BROADENING THE DEFINITION OF TOLERABILITY IN CANCER CLINICAL TRIALS TO BETTER MEASURE THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

whitepaper

Nov 07, 2018

Robust safety and tolerability data are essential in cancer therapeutic studies, and some trials are specifically designed with a key objective of demonstrating improved safety and tolerability. The development of a clinical trial framework and data ...

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What Is the Difference Between Teen and Adult Brains? WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TEEN AND ADULT BRAINS?

video

Nov 07, 2018

Teens are often characterized as angsty, impulsive, socially inept citizens without fully formed brains, straddling the worlds of being a child and an adult but how much of that is true?

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P2K system could resolve bottlenecks in drug research P2K SYSTEM COULD RESOLVE BOTTLENECKS IN DRUG RESEARCH

blog article

Nov 07, 2018

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests. The new technology called Pattern to Knowledge (P2K...

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Simple Method For Linking Molecules Could Help Overcome Drug Resistant Infections SIMPLE METHOD FOR LINKING MOLECULES COULD HELP OVERCOME DRUG RESISTANT INFECTIONS

blog article

Nov 07, 2018

Using a novel type of chemical reaction, MIT researchers have shown that they can modify antibiotics in a way that could potentially make them more effective against drug-resistant infections. By chemically linking the antibiotic vancomycin to an ant...

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Tracking Down MicroRNA Candidates That Can Contribute To Disease TRACKING DOWN MICRORNA CANDIDATES THAT CAN CONTRIBUTE TO DISEASE

blog article

Nov 07, 2018

What started as Ninad Oak’s side project turned out into something much larger, his doctorate thesis. “The project started as the qualifying exam that I proposed at the end of my first year of graduate school,” said Oak, a graduate ...

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Improving Sepsis Care IMPROVING SEPSIS CARE

blog article

Nov 07, 2018

Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room. Sepsis is o...

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Parasitic worm study predicts potential drug targets and drugs PARASITIC WORM STUDY PREDICTS POTENTIAL DRUG TARGETS AND DRUGS

blog article

Nov 06, 2018

Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Edinburgh, and other collaborators have conducted the largest genomic study on parasitic worms. They identified numerous drug targets, potential dru...

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Why Do Scientists Keep Finding New Organs? WHY DO SCIENTISTS KEEP FINDING NEW ORGANS?

video

Nov 06, 2018

This long ignored connective tissue now serves a more important role and may act as a shock absorber, keeps our organs in place, and even plays a major role in the spread of cancer. But is it an organ?

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Depression New Insights Shifting the Treatment Paradigm Whitepaper DEPRESSION NEW INSIGHTS SHIFTING THE TREATMENT PARADIGM WHITEPAPER

whitepaper

Nov 05, 2018

Depression affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans, with 10 – 30% of depression patients becoming treatment-resistant. Find out what the pipeline looks like for depression and what the emerging strategies in this area are in Depression: New Insi...

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Let LET'S TALK ABOUT FERTILITY. LET'S TALK ABOUT THE FUTURE.

video

Nov 05, 2018

When is the right time to have children? Have you ever wondered about your fertility? What is ovarian reserve testing? These are all questions more and more women are asking themselves when thinking about starting a family. Listen to women sharing th...

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A Digital Health Intelligence white paper supported by Samsung A DIGITAL HEALTH INTELLIGENCE WHITE PAPER SUPPORTED BY SAMSUNG

whitepaper

Nov 05, 2018

This white paper represents a key piece of research into the potential benefits of mobile working in healthcare and considers the obstacles that will have to be surmounted along the way. Given our research was conducted in the aftermath of last May&r...

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Heat-resistant enzymes for cost-effective drugs HEAT-RESISTANT ENZYMES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE DRUGS

blog article

Nov 05, 2018

A recent study looked to one of the most essential enzymes in medicine to aid better, and more cost-effective design of drugs. The research was co-authored by Dr. Nitin Jain, UT Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Associate Professor, and...

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STATE TELEHEALTH LAWS & REIMBURSEMENT POLICIES STATE TELEHEALTH LAWS & REIMBURSEMENT POLICIES

whitepaper

Nov 02, 2018

The Center for Connected Health Policy’s (CCHP) Fall 2018 release of its report on “State Telehealth Laws and Reimbursement Policies” offers policymakers, health advocates, and other interested health care professionals a freshly re...

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Unlocking digital health: Opportunities for the mobile value chain UNLOCKING DIGITAL HEALTH: OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE MOBILE VALUE CHAIN

whitepaper

Nov 02, 2018

Mobile value chain revenues in the US grew 10 percent per annum from 2009 to 2014, and profits rose by as much as 15 percent. The year 2015 is expected to see 3 percent growth in revenues and 6 percent growth in profits.

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Utilizing External Collaboration To Accelerate Vaccine Development UTILIZING EXTERNAL COLLABORATION TO ACCELERATE VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

whitepaper

Nov 02, 2018

As the pharmaceutical industry continues to look for new and innovative ways to treat disease, some companies are putting more focus on how to prevent them. Vaccine development, while a long and complex process, has the potential to save millions of ...

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Transforming Healthcare IT with Enterprise Cloud TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE IT WITH ENTERPRISE CLOUD

whitepaper

Nov 02, 2018

A Nutanix enterprise cloud reduces the cost and complexity of IT infrastructure for healthcare while improving scaling, availability, and data protection. Conventional infrastructure is no longer able to address healthcare challenges, such as regulat...

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Researchers may stop Parkinson RESEARCHERS MAY STOP PARKINSON'S BY 'COOLING OFF' BRAIN

blog article

Nov 02, 2018

Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative condition, has no cure. However, specialists are hard at work to remedy that situation. A new study conducted in mice suggests that one way to treat this condition may be by "cooling off&q...

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Could the appendix trigger Parkinson COULD THE APPENDIX TRIGGER PARKINSON'S?

blog article

Nov 02, 2018

A new study concludes that for some people, having had their appendix removed decades earlier reduced the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by almost 20 percent. Parkinson's disease is a long-term degenerative condition that affects the ...

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New Statistical Tool Helps Makes Sense of Brainwaves NEW STATISTICAL TOOL HELPS MAKES SENSE OF BRAINWAVES

blog article

Nov 02, 2018

A new statistical tool for collectively analyzing large sets of brainwaves promises to accelerate neurofunctional research. The lack of tools to be able to pinpoint anomalies in large datasets that vary through time sparked a search by KAUST scientis...

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A genomic DNA library A GENOMIC DNA LIBRARY

infographic

Nov 01, 2018

A genomic DNA library is a collection of DNA fragments that make up the full-length genome of an organism. A genomic library is created by isolating DNA from cells and then amplifying it using DNA cloning technology.

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MS: How too much salt can cause inflammation MS: HOW TOO MUCH SALT CAN CAUSE INFLAMMATION

blog article

Nov 01, 2018

New research, published in the journal Nature Immunology, now shows how a high intake of salt may cause inflammation in multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys the protectiv...

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Can fermented dairy shield you against heart disease? CAN FERMENTED DAIRY SHIELD YOU AGAINST HEART DISEASE?

blog article

Nov 01, 2018

Many experts have debated the effect of dairy on cardiovascular health. A recent study in Finland has shown that consuming a particular type of dairy, namely fermented dairy, may actually have a protective effect against heart disease. Coronary ...

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Dodgy Heart? There DODGY HEART? THERE'S AN APP FOR THAT

blog article

Nov 01, 2018

A clinical trial to determine whether a smartwatch app that analyzes pulse-rate data can screen for a heart-rhythm disorder has enrolled more than 400,000 participants. Researchers at Stanford Medicine, in collaboration with Apple, launched the Apple...

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Loneliness tied to a higher risk of dementia LONELINESS TIED TO A HIGHER RISK OF DEMENTIA

blog article

Oct 31, 2018

Recent research into older adults confirms that loneliness is tied to a raised risk of developing dementia. The study also reveals that the effect ranges across a diversity of people and is independent of how much social contact they have. Scien...

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Novel Conjugates: Flexible, Stable & Potent Against Cancer NOVEL CONJUGATES: FLEXIBLE, STABLE & POTENT AGAINST CANCER

blog article

Oct 31, 2018

Linking therapeutically active molecules to specific antibodies can help to pilot them to their designated targets and minimize side effects--especially when treating tumors. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now described novel conju...

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Boosting Tumor Cell Drug Sensitivity BOOSTING TUMOR CELL DRUG SENSITIVITY

blog article

Oct 31, 2018

Pancreatic cancer cells deficient in the expression of the human gene known as Schlafen 11 and resistant to chemotherapy (left panels) were re-sensitized to chemotherapeutic treatment (middle and right panels) by inhibiting the expression of the tran...

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Eye scan may detect Alzheimer EYE SCAN MAY DETECT ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE IN SECONDS

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

Two new studies now suggest that a noninvasive eye scan could soon be used to catch Alzheimer's disease early. The world's population is aging rapidly and the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is on the rise. For this reason, the need for...

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How does income actually affect life expectancy? HOW DOES INCOME ACTUALLY AFFECT LIFE EXPECTANCY?

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

The current notion about income and health status is that the wealthier a person is, the longer they can expect to live because they will have easier access to appropriate healthcare. A new study, however, takes a more complex approach and suggests t...

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'NATURAL PROTEIN' COULD REVERSE OBESITY-RELATED DIABETES, FATTY LIVER

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

A chance finds in cancer research has revealed that a protein that occurs naturally in the body plays an important role in regulating metabolism. Further investigation led to the suggestion that raising levels of the protein could reverse fatty liver...

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Water as a biomarker against cancer? WATER AS A BIOMARKER AGAINST CANCER?

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

A study by researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country and the Biofísika Institute has found that The team of researchers found that the Tn antigen appears in around 90 percent of cancers, and is also associated with metastasis...

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Nature NATURE'S 'KILL CODE' MAY DESTROY CANCER

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

Two recent studies detail a natural mechanism that, if harnessed properly, may be able to destroy cancer cells and their ability to become resistant to treatment without any of the side effects of chemotherapy. In a study published last year, sc...

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Intriguing egg protein behavior may shape fertility and cancer treatment INTRIGUING EGG PROTEIN BEHAVIOR MAY SHAPE FERTILITY AND CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Oct 30, 2018

Researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have discovered the complicated mechanisms with which three proteins regulate each other in female mouse eggs, or ova ­– indicating that the finding may play an important role in female fertil...

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The Need For Non-Invasive Diagnosis And Monitoring Of NASH THE NEED FOR NON-INVASIVE DIAGNOSIS AND MONITORING OF NASH

blog article

Oct 29, 2018

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a chronic liver disease and is increasing in prevalence as an etiology for end-stage liver disease and also hepatocellular carcinoma. NASH is often a silent disease and many patients have undiagnosed NASH for se...

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Surgeons carry out spine surgery in the womb SURGEONS CARRY OUT SPINE SURGERY IN THE WOMB

blog article

Oct 28, 2018

In a condition known as spina bifida, children are born with an exposed spinal cord, which causes numerous physical and developmental issues. Usually, surgeons will operate on spina bifida after birth, but a complex in utero surgery can allow the bab...

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New drug kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria in clinical trial NEW DRUG KILLS ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BACTERIA IN CLINICAL TRIAL

blog article

Oct 27, 2018

Antibiotic resistance is a major obstacle that modern medicine is currently grappling with. It has created crisis situations around the world, and researchers are trying to find solutions. One clinical trial is now breaking the superbug barrier. Bact...

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Why American Sunscreens Suck WHY AMERICAN SUNSCREENS SUCK

video

Oct 26, 2018

Not all sunscreens are created equal, and American sunscreens may not be protecting you as much as other sunscreens you could find in other countries. We spoke with dermatologist Dr. Seemal Desai for more information.

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MRI tool to cure digestive disorders MRI TOOL TO CURE DIGESTIVE DISORDERS

blog article

Oct 26, 2018

More than 60 million people in the US suffer from disorders in the gastrointestinal tract that could be cured by electrical stimulation, but scientists don’t fully understand the therapy’s effects on a critical organ: the stomach. Purdue ...

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Cluster Of Factors Could Help Predict C. Diff CLUSTER OF FACTORS COULD HELP PREDICT C. DIFF

blog article

Oct 25, 2018

A cluster of factors may help predict which patients are likely to develop Clostridioides difficult, a potentially life-threatening disease commonly known as C. difficile or C. diff, a new study has found. And that could help in efforts to prevent in...

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Infant Diet Important for Healthy Gut Long-term INFANT DIET IMPORTANT FOR HEALTHY GUT LONG-TERM

blog article

Oct 25, 2018

A child has until the age of two-and-a-half to establish healthy gut bacteria with little change after this point, new research has revealed. The study also reinforced the important role breastfeeding plays in providing good gut bacteria to babies du...

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Summary of All Known Human Genes Involved in Human Cancer SUMMARY OF ALL KNOWN HUMAN GENES INVOLVED IN HUMAN CANCER

blog article

Oct 25, 2018

Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute have created the first comprehensive summary of all genes known to be involved in human cancer, the "Cancer Gene Census". Describing all genes strongly implicated in causing cancer, the Census al...

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Scientists image antibodies working together against malaria SCIENTISTS IMAGE ANTIBODIES WORKING TOGETHER AGAINST MALARIA

blog article

Oct 24, 2018

Researchers investigating how the human immune system defends against malaria have uncovered a rare phenomenon: antibodies working together to bind to a vulnerable spot on the parasite. The new research shows that antibodies working together can resu...

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Antiphospholipid antibodies linked to heart attacks ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES LINKED TO HEART ATTACKS

blog article

Oct 23, 2018

Levels of antiphospholipid antibodies, which are associated with rheumatic diseases, are also elevated in myocardial infarction without any autoimmune co-morbidity. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are a group of antibodies that target endogenous ti...

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Protein adhesion complex cell structure identified PROTEIN ADHESION COMPLEX CELL STRUCTURE IDENTIFIED

blog article

Oct 23, 2018

A new structure in human cells has been discovered by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with colleagues in the UK. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and prove...

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Post-heart Attack Antibody Levels May Guide Treatment POST-HEART ATTACK ANTIBODY LEVELS MAY GUIDE TREATMENT

blog article

Oct 23, 2018

Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are a group of antibodies that target endogenous tissue, including the fat molecule cardiolipin and the plasma protein β2glycoprotein-I. Cardiolipin is found in the membranes of blood vessel and blood platelet c...

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How the Brain HOW THE BRAIN'S EPIGENETIC FACTORS CHANGE IN ALZHEIMER'S

blog article

Oct 23, 2018

Pioneering research into the mechanisms controlling gene activity in the brain could hold the key to understanding Alzheimer’s disease and might help identify effective treatments in the future. An international research team led by scientists ...

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Pharmaceutical Challenges Aided by a Laboratory Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) System PHARMACEUTICAL CHALLENGES AIDED BY A LABORATORY POWDER X-RAY DIFFRACTION (PXRD) SYSTEM

whitepaper

Oct 22, 2018

This white paper explores a number of ways that today’s modern, laboratory-based  PXRD instrumentation and advanced software can greatly assist pharmaceutical scientists in their quest to develop high quality, stable products and accelerat...

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New Treatment Approach For Advanced Anal Cancer NEW TREATMENT APPROACH FOR ADVANCED ANAL CANCER

blog article

Oct 22, 2018

Around 1,300 people are diagnosed with anal cancer each year in the UK and this number is rising by around three percent per year. Due to small patient populations, there is very limited evidence to guide treatment decisions, and international consen...

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Clearing Senescent Cells From The Brain In Mice Preserves Cognition CLEARING SENESCENT CELLS FROM THE BRAIN IN MICE PRESERVES COGNITION

blog article

Oct 22, 2018

Out-of-commission cells that clutter the brain may accelerate dementia, according to researchers who found that getting rid of such cells preserved cognitive function in mice. The NIA-funded research suggests that senescent cells that are alive but n...

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Math6 gene dysfunction may lead to miscarriages MATH6 GENE DYSFUNCTION MAY LEAD TO MISCARRIAGES

blog article

Oct 22, 2018

A single gene of the mother plays such a crucial role in the development of the placenta that its dysfunction leads to miscarriages. Researchers from the Medical Faculty of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have observed this in so-called knockout m...

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Hospital Pharmacies Offer an Untapped Source of Powerful Cost Savings HOSPITAL PHARMACIES OFFER AN UNTAPPED SOURCE OF POWERFUL COST SAVINGS

whitepaper

Oct 19, 2018

Facing increasing margin pressures—and having already implemented many proven cost reduction and revenue-increasing measures—hospitals and health systems have to find new ways of reducing their costs without compromising quality or patien...

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Better drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier BETTER DRUG DELIVERY THROUGH THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER

blog article

Oct 19, 2018

Research on the delivery of therapeutics to the brain could have implications for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, ALS, brain cancer and Parkinson’s. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Centre ...

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Protein mTOR regulated by Src in cancer growth PROTEIN MTOR REGULATED BY SRC IN CANCER GROWTH

blog article

Oct 19, 2018

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital have revealed a connection between mTORC1 and Src, two proteins known to be hyperactive in cancer. The study shows that Src is necessary and sufficient to activate mTORC1 a...

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2017 Completed Trials 2017 COMPLETED TRIALS

whitepaper

Oct 18, 2018

As Informa Pharma Intelligence has done for the past three years, this analysis examines the landscape of industry-sponsored clinical trials completed during 2017, of which there were a total of 3,534 Phase I through Phase III/IV. The nearly 700 tria...

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Exploiting Epigenetics in Cancer Treatment EXPLOITING EPIGENETICS IN CANCER TREATMENT

blog article

Oct 18, 2018

Changes to the complex of DNA and the proteins that form chromatin are important drivers in many cancers. We explore the challenges and progress in the development of new therapies targeting epigenetic regulators. “Epigenetics was originally de...

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Scottish Cow Confirmed To Have Mad Cow Disease SCOTTISH COW CONFIRMED TO HAVE MAD COW DISEASE

video

Oct 18, 2018

According to a spokesman for the authorities in Edinburgh, the incidence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy was identified "as a result of strict control measures we have in place. It has been described as an "isolated case." a spokes...

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The study uses brain cells in a dish to understand polygenic origins of schizophrenia THE STUDY USES BRAIN CELLS IN A DISH TO UNDERSTAND POLYGENIC ORIGINS OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

blog article

Oct 18, 2018

A recent study has established a new analytical method for investigating the complex genetic origins of mental illnesses using brain cells that are grown in a dish from human embryonic stem cells. The polygenic factors associated with psychiatric dis...

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Use of stem cells improves the efficacy of immunotherapy in brain tumor model USE OF STEM CELLS IMPROVES THE EFFICACY OF IMMUNOTHERAPY IN BRAIN TUMOR MODEL

video

Oct 17, 2018

University of Florida Health brain cancer researchers have discovered a new use of stem cells that could clear a revolutionary pathway to making immunotherapy effective in brain cancer.

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Key genomic differences in breast cancers of women of different ethnicity KEY GENOMIC DIFFERENCES IN BREAST CANCERS OF WOMEN OF DIFFERENT ETHNICITY

blog article

Oct 17, 2018

A study comparing DNA and RNA data from Nigerian breast cancer patients to patients in a United States database found that certain aggressive molecular features were far more prevalent in tumors from Nigerian women than in black or white American wom...

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Investigating tumour microenvironments for more effective treatments INVESTIGATING TUMOUR MICROENVIRONMENTS FOR MORE EFFECTIVE TREATMENTS

blog article

Oct 17, 2018

Researchers have gained insights into the microenvironment of different types of lung tumors, describing how the cell ecosystems may affect response to treatment. The microenvironment of a cell impact how it grows behaves and communicates with other ...

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Using Facebook to predict depression USING FACEBOOK TO PREDICT DEPRESSION

blog article

Oct 17, 2018

New research uses over half a million Facebook status updates to predict depression diagnoses in people at risk. Depression is one of the most widespread mental health problems in the United States, with over 16 million adults have experienced at lea...

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Keto diet may protect against cognitive decline KETO DIET MAY PROTECT AGAINST COGNITIVE DECLINE

blog article

Oct 16, 2018

Ketogenic, or keto, diets are low-carb and fat-rich, and many people who follow such regimens do it to shed excess weight. However, a keto diet may bring other benefits, too. In particular, it may help keep the brain healthy and young, as new researc...

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Diabetes: Surprising new role of fat revealed DIABETES: SURPRISING NEW ROLE OF FAT REVEALED

blog article

Oct 16, 2018

A new study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, challenges the current understanding of what causes diabetes. The findings may lead to new therapies. More than two decades ago, researchers suggested that the action of an enzyme called protein ...

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Neutrophil NEUTROPHIL'S ROLE DURING TUMOR PROGRESSION UNRAVELED

blog article

Oct 16, 2018

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have characterized the function of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, during early stages of tumor progression, showing that they migrate from the bone marrow to distant sites and facilitate tumor cell seedi...

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Virtual Reality Shows We Eat with Our Eyes VIRTUAL REALITY SHOWS WE EAT WITH OUR EYES

blog article

Oct 16, 2018

Humans not only relish the sweet, savory and saltiness of foods, but they are influenced by the environment in which they eat. Cornell food scientists used virtual reality to show how people’s perception of real food can be altered by their sur...

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Benefits of hard X-radiation BENEFITS OF HARD X-RADIATION

whitepaper

Oct 15, 2018

This white paper outlines the main benefits of using hard radiation for material analysis studies. X-ray powder diffractometers are generally equipped with X-ray sources using Cu anodes. For specific applications, however, switching to shorter wavele...

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Why Your Elbow Hurts When You Bump It The Wrong Way WHY YOUR ELBOW HURTS WHEN YOU BUMP IT THE WRONG WAY

video

Oct 15, 2018

Everyone knows that painful sensation when the "funny bone" in your elbow is bumped. It turns out, that pinching and numbing sensation have nothing to do with the bone.

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Lassa fever vaccine reveals new test for immunity LASSA FEVER VACCINE REVEALS NEW TEST FOR IMMUNITY

blog article

Oct 15, 2018

Lassa fever belongs to the same class of hemorrhagic fevers like Ebola. Like Ebola, it has been a major health threat in Western Africa, infecting 100,000-300,000 people and killing 5,000 per year. A new vaccine against both rabies and Lassa has demo...

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Cancer stem cells use normal genes in abnormal ways CANCER STEM CELLS USE NORMAL GENES IN ABNORMAL WAYS

blog article

Oct 15, 2018

CDK1 is a “normal” protein – its presence drives cells through the cycle of replication. And MHC Class I molecules are “normal” as well – they present bits of proteins on the surfaces of cells for examination by th...

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Why Do Wisdom Teeth Suck? WHY DO WISDOM TEETH SUCK?

video

Oct 14, 2018

Every year, 5 million Americans have their wisdom teeth removed. These pesky molars can cause infections tooth decay and even tumors. The problem? Wisdom teeth often can’t fit in our mouths. But that wasn’t always the case. Early human an...

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ADHD overdiagnosis in younger students, says global study ADHD OVERDIAGNOSIS IN YOUNGER STUDENTS, SAYS GLOBAL STUDY

video

Oct 14, 2018

Researchers are warning teachers and clinicians are mistaking immaturity in the classroom for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD. A global study shows the youngest children in a classroom are often compared with their older and more mat...

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A cure for Alzheimer’s? Yes, a cure for Alzheimer’s! A CURE FOR ALZHEIMER’S? YES, A CURE FOR ALZHEIMER’S!

blog article

Oct 14, 2018

This is the most important column I’ve ever written.  The message is quite complex–dozens of new health parameters to test for and to optimize, all of them interacting in ways that will require new training for MDs.  The message...

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Developing and maintaining a quality management system for IVDs DEVELOPING AND MAINTAINING A QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR IVDS

whitepaper

Oct 12, 2018

There are many different requirements with which in vitro diagnostic manufacturers must comply in order to place the product on the market. At the core of most of these requirements is a fundamental need to have a good quality management system (QMS)...

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Tomodachi J&J Disaster Nursing Training Program TOMODACHI J&J DISASTER NURSING TRAINING PROGRAM

video

Oct 12, 2018

Meet students from the Tomodachi J&J Disaster Nursing Training Program in this video—and learn why, after the disaster, they decided to become nurses.

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Food Microbiology FOOD MICROBIOLOGY

infographic

Oct 12, 2018

Microorganisms inevitably inhabit our food as they do every other corner of the Earth. Many exist there harmlessly, and some can even be beneficial. However, there is also a subsection that can make us ill or even kill. Consequently, food microbiolog...

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Healthcare Interoperability Woes: Three Solutions that Create Optimism HEALTHCARE INTEROPERABILITY WOES: THREE SOLUTIONS THAT CREATE OPTIMISM

blog article

Oct 12, 2018

Let’s face it: healthcare interoperability remains an intractable problem, and discussion about it continues without signs of settling down. Both healthcare providers and patients feel unease about limited access to medical data, which results ...

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Hospital Labs Focus On Staffing, Automation, Cost Control HOSPITAL LABS FOCUS ON STAFFING, AUTOMATION, COST CONTROL

infographic

Oct 12, 2018

Hospital labs say staffing will be their leading challenge over the next year, and that inadequate staffing is having a significant impact on their staff operations. Declining reimbursement levels have made cost-control a leading priority. Many labs ...

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Drug target identified in oestrogen receptors DRUG TARGET IDENTIFIED IN OESTROGEN RECEPTORS

blog article

Oct 12, 2018

A team of scientists has described a strategy to disrupt the estrogen receptor in order to access a therapeutic drug target. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered a previously uncharacterized, bridge-like ...

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Novel Genetic Study Sheds New Light On Risk Of Heart Attack NOVEL GENETIC STUDY SHEDS NEW LIGHT ON RISK OF HEART ATTACK

blog article

Oct 12, 2018

Loss of a protein that regulates mitochondrial function can greatly increase the risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack), Vanderbilt scientists reported Oct. 3 in the journal eLife. The study illustrates how “integrative genomics,” a...

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Breast cancer: Omega-3-rich diet may stop tumors from spreading BREAST CANCER: OMEGA-3-RICH DIET MAY STOP TUMORS FROM SPREADING

blog article

Oct 11, 2018

New research shows that a diet rich in marine omega-3 fatty acids slows the growth and spread of breast cancer cells in female mice. The diet enriched with omega-3 also improved the rodents' survival. A vast body of research hails the benefi...

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Lung Cancer Deaths 28 Percent Lower In California Due To Long-Term, Aggressive Tobacco Control Programs LUNG CANCER DEATHS 28 PERCENT LOWER IN CALIFORNIA DUE TO LONG-TERM, AGGRESSIVE TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAMS

blog article

Oct 11, 2018

Early adoption of tobacco control efforts in California led to fewer people ever smoking, reduced the amount used by those who do smoke and helped smokers quit at a younger age when their risk of developing lung cancer is lowest. As a result, say the...

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Wired for Life: Study links infants WIRED FOR LIFE: STUDY LINKS INFANTS' BRAIN CIRCUITRY TO FUTURE HEALTH

blog article

Oct 11, 2018

Growth rates of brain circuits in infancy may help experts predict what a child's intelligence and emotional health could be when the child turns 4, a new study has found. Along with prior research, these findings could help future physicians ide...

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Lassa Fever Vaccine Shows Promise and Reveals New Test for Immunity LASSA FEVER VACCINE SHOWS PROMISE AND REVEALS NEW TEST FOR IMMUNITY

blog article

Oct 11, 2018

Lassa fever belongs to the same class of hemorrhagic fevers like Ebola. Like Ebola, it has been a major health threat in Western Africa, infecting 100,000-300,000 people and killing 5,000 per year. A new vaccine against both rabies and Lassa has demo...

Read More

Unlocking the Secrets of Brain Organization -in the Fruit Fly UNLOCKING THE SECRETS OF BRAIN ORGANIZATION -IN THE FRUIT FLY

blog article

Oct 10, 2018

We’re on the cusp of solving how all the neurons in the fruit fly brain are connected. This represents a huge milestone for the field of neuroscience and a giant leap forward in the understanding of human brains, but how? As many people spent t...

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Micropeptide molecule restores heart function MICROPEPTIDE MOLECULE RESTORES HEART FUNCTION

blog article

Oct 10, 2018

Researchers have discovered a micro peptide molecule that can restore normal heart function in mice. The micropeptide works by preventing calcium dysregulation and remodeling of the heart and could be a promising new gene therapy target to treat hear...

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The Value of Medical Attachments THE VALUE OF MEDICAL ATTACHMENTS

infographic

Oct 09, 2018

The health care industry still has a big paper problem. According to one report, faxes account for almost 75 percent of all medical communication. One way to address this problem is to make it easier for providers to electronically attach supporting ...

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Existing drug may treat triple-negative breast cancer EXISTING DRUG MAY TREAT TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER

blog article

Oct 09, 2018

The existing drug estradiol can inhibit tumor growth in a subtype of triple-negative breast cancer. The researchers may soon test the repurposed drug in phase II clinical trial. Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer whe...

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Paralysis from Rare Disorder: Stem Cell Therapy Trial Brings Hope PARALYSIS FROM RARE DISORDER: STEM CELL THERAPY TRIAL BRINGS HOPE

blog article

Oct 09, 2018

By injecting patients with stem cells engineered to repair the central nervous system – called progenitor cells – scientists are working to establish the first treatment that can repair spinal cords inflamed by transverse myelitis. If suc...

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Decoding Cancer: What Is Breast Cancer? DECODING CANCER: WHAT IS BREAST CANCER?

video

Oct 08, 2018

Breast cancer can happen to nearly any woman or man, but certain factors can increase a person’s risk for the disease. On The Doctors, our Dr. Freda Lewis-Hall explains why not all risk factors are created equal.

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Researchers develop the medical device that dissolves in the body RESEARCHERS DEVELOP THE MEDICAL DEVICE THAT DISSOLVES IN THE BODY

video

Oct 08, 2018

Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves healing of a dama...

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What Can Happen to the Human Heart After Months of Swimming? | The Swim WHAT CAN HAPPEN TO THE HUMAN HEART AFTER MONTHS OF SWIMMING? | THE SWIM

video

Oct 08, 2018

Using ultrasound and a prototype waterproof monitor, medics and researchers are watching Ben Lecomte's heart closely. Can the way we examine his EKG waves in ocean waves help us prevent fatal heart disease?

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Inflammatory Marker Tied To Kidney Decline In Healthy Adults INFLAMMATORY MARKER TIED TO KIDNEY DECLINE IN HEALTHY ADULTS

blog article

Oct 08, 2018

A large, multiethnic study of healthy individuals found that high blood levels of an inflammatory marker are linked with the long-term decline of kidney function. The results may shed light on biological mechanisms that spur chronic kidney disease. T...

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Researchers develop a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy RESEARCHERS DEVELOP A POTENTIAL TOOL FOR EFFICACIOUS TARGETED CANCER THERAPY

blog article

Oct 08, 2018

Researchers at the Faculty of Pharmacy have developed PeptiENV, a cancer vaccine platform, which can be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic enveloped viruses currently in clinical use. With the help of this new cancer vaccine platfo...

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Efficacy of PET imaging in managing chronic liver diseases EFFICACY OF PET IMAGING IN MANAGING CHRONIC LIVER DISEASES

blog article

Oct 08, 2018

Despite liver biopsies being powerful and reliable, they are also invasive, painful, limited and subject to complications. These effects may soon be a thing of the past for some patients. Research showing PET imaging with the 18F-FAC radiotracer can ...

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What your Blood says about your Health WHAT YOUR BLOOD SAYS ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

video

Oct 07, 2018

For most of us, this is probably our least favorite part of our doctor’s visit. “You will be amazed at what the blood can tell about the body,” said Shaka Terrell, a lab assistant with Lee Health. For a healthy adult, health experts...

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AI algorithm accurately predicts Alzheimer’s disease onset AI ALGORITHM ACCURATELY PREDICTS ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE ONSET

blog article

Oct 05, 2018

Dr. Mallar Chakravarty, a computational neuroscientist at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, and his colleagues from the University of Toronto and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, designed an algorithm that learns signatures f...

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Viruses In Blood Lead To Digestive Problems VIRUSES IN BLOOD LEAD TO DIGESTIVE PROBLEMS

blog article

Oct 04, 2018

While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people po...

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Ovarian cancer: Taking regular low-dose aspirin can lower risk OVARIAN CANCER: TAKING REGULAR LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN CAN LOWER RISK

blog article

Oct 04, 2018

An analysis of data from hundreds of thousands of women in the United States has found that regularly taking low-dose aspirin is linked to a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer. The team found a 23 percent lower risk of ovarian cancer in wom...

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Study Links Individual HPV Types To HIV Infection STUDY LINKS INDIVIDUAL HPV TYPES TO HIV INFECTION

blog article

Oct 04, 2018

An international research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has for the first time identified individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to HIV infection. The study, published ...

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Nuclear tracer helps to study the aging brain NUCLEAR TRACER HELPS TO STUDY THE AGING BRAIN

blog article

Oct 04, 2018

A PET imaging radiotracer could help researchers understand the neurodegenerative disease and the aging brain. Researchers from John Hopkins University found that the radiotracer rapidly entered the brain, and was distributed quickly. Previous studie...

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Allen Cell Methods: Thawing human iPS cells ALLEN CELL METHODS: THAWING HUMAN IPS CELLS

video

Oct 03, 2018

To ensure researchers have success working with our human induced pluripotent stem cell lines in their lab, our Jacqueline Smith highlights nuanced techniques and helpful tips while demonstrating how to thaw a vial of hiPS cells.

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PSD-95 molecule reveal potential treatment for stroke patients PSD-95 MOLECULE REVEAL POTENTIAL TREATMENT FOR STROKE PATIENTS

blog article

Oct 03, 2018

A novel hybrid approach has revealed a 3D structure of a protein fragment that could serve as a drug target in treating stroke patients. The protein called “postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa (PSD-95)” is positioned on neurons in the ...

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Why sudden cardiac arrests no longer peak in the morning WHY SUDDEN CARDIAC ARRESTS NO LONGER PEAK IN THE MORNING

blog article

Oct 03, 2018

New research, published in the journal Heart Rhythm, discovers that due to recent cultural shifts in our work schedules and daily stressors, sudden cardiac arrests no longer tend to occur in the mornings. Until now, the consensus has been that a...

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Pipeline Management and Forecasting Are Key to Improving the Sales Experience PIPELINE MANAGEMENT AND FORECASTING ARE KEY TO IMPROVING THE SALES EXPERIENCE

whitepaper

Oct 03, 2018

Let’s explore some of the current processes around pipeline management and forecasting and how they can be improved.

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Change the sales rep experience, improve the customer experience CHANGE THE SALES REP EXPERIENCE, IMPROVE THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

whitepaper

Oct 03, 2018

The first CRM launch truly changed the way sales were managed. We went from tracking customers on spreadsheets (and even in rolodexes) to tracking them and their attendant opportunities with software. It wasn’t long before reps started to feel ...

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Driving Sales Behavior With Non-Cash Rewards DRIVING SALES BEHAVIOR WITH NON-CASH REWARDS

whitepaper

Oct 03, 2018

In the end, you need to be rewarding your sales reps with more than just money if you want to keep them motivated and if you want your sales compensation plan to deliver on its promises.

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Targets for chronic kidney disease treatment TARGETS FOR CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE TREATMENT

blog article

Oct 02, 2018

DAB2 could be a target for chronic kidney disease treatments after researchers investigated how genetic variations drive the expression of genes within the cells of the kidney. The kidney works harder than any other organ in the body, tasked with ext...

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What are the risks of having too much amniotic fluid? WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF HAVING TOO MUCH AMNIOTIC FLUID?

blog article

Oct 02, 2018

Women experience polyhydramnios when too much amniotic fluid surrounds the fetus in the womb. This excess fluid can slightly increase the risk of complications during pregnancy and delivery. As a result, doctors usually monitor fluid levels regularly...

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How to identify psoriasis and ringworm HOW TO IDENTIFY PSORIASIS AND RINGWORM

blog article

Oct 02, 2018

Both psoriasis and ringworm cause red, scaly patches on the skin. Knowing the symptoms of each condition can help people to identify their rash. Psoriasis and ringworm are very different conditions. Ringworm is a fungal infection that will go away wi...

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Amazonian plant provides antitumour activity AMAZONIAN PLANT PROVIDES ANTITUMOUR ACTIVITY

blog article

Oct 01, 2018

Research conducted by scientists at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country shows the amazonian Vismia baccifera plant causing oxidative stress in hepatic tumor cells. The Free Radicals and Oxidative Stress Group in the Faculty of Medicine and N...

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Cybersecurity in the Age of Medical Devices CYBERSECURITY IN THE AGE OF MEDICAL DEVICES

whitepaper

Sep 28, 2018

Countless studies and articles have confirmed that connected medical devices from implantable products like pacemakers to diagnostic devices such as CT scanners and more are indeed vulnerable to malicious exploitation. This paper offers both technica...

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Kidney disease biomarker could help detect COPD KIDNEY DISEASE BIOMARKER COULD HELP DETECT COPD

blog article

Sep 28, 2018

A biomarker commonly used with kidney disease could also indicate lung problems, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Researchers reported a link between COPD and levels of albuminuria, the amount of albumin in urine. The researche...

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KCNB1 may be a root cause of Alzheimer’s disease KCNB1 MAY BE A ROOT CAUSE OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

blog article

Sep 27, 2018

A new mechanism has been developed that could contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury. Researchers from Rutgers University in New Jersey aim to launch a clinical trial to test this treatment in humans. Scientists have long ...

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Sugar specific molecules show promising results for new allergy vaccine SUGAR SPECIFIC MOLECULES SHOW PROMISING RESULTS FOR NEW ALLERGY VACCINE

blog article

Sep 27, 2018

Using sugar molecules researchers have developed a new vaccine for hay fever that may reduce treatment times and increase the effectiveness of treatments. The vaccine, which is still at the earliest research stage, has been tested on mice. The method...

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Overview of brain diseases OVERVIEW OF BRAIN DISEASES

infographic

Sep 26, 2018

Disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system are very severe in nature. They may lead to the complete degeneration of the neurological system and permanently incapacitate an individual. These disorders are observed mainly after the age of 6...

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Overview of food poisoning OVERVIEW OF FOOD POISONING

infographic

Sep 26, 2018

Global mortality rates are exponentially increasing every year due to lack of minimum hygiene conditions in the low and middle-income countries. World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that 3,51,000 death cases worldwide are documented each year...

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Advancing human genetics research with nanopore sequencing ADVANCING HUMAN GENETICS RESEARCH WITH NANOPORE SEQUENCING

whitepaper

Sep 26, 2018

High-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of human genetics, allowing researchers to more easily investigate and understand biological processes and their impact. Using these technologies, researchers can analyze entire ge...

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It May Be Possible To Detect Mental, Neurological Disorders With Brain Scan Technology IT MAY BE POSSIBLE TO DETECT MENTAL, NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS WITH BRAIN SCAN TECHNOLOGY

video

Sep 26, 2018

Autism is a growing concern not only for parents and children but healthcare providers as well as researchers and public health officials. The latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the prevalence of autism has i...

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What is Mesothelioma? WHAT IS MESOTHELIOMA?

infographic

Sep 26, 2018

Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer that can affect various organs in the body. Almost all mesothelioma cases are directly linked to asbestos exposure.

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Raising Awareness About Brain Aneurysms RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT BRAIN ANEURYSMS

video

Sep 25, 2018

Christine Buckley, the executive director of the Brain Aneurysm Foundation, talks about efforts to raise awareness of the health problem, advance research, and help families affected. Interview for BNN News. Aired September 25, 2018.

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Breast tissue simulations address enhanced MRI delays BREAST TISSUE SIMULATIONS ADDRESS ENHANCED MRI DELAYS

blog article

Sep 25, 2018

Researchers from Purdue University argue that as no two women have the same breast tissue, MRI’s detecting and monitoring breast cancer should not treat all women the same way. As methods of ensuring the safety of new MRIs, clinical MRIs have n...

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Cryo-EM shows structure of TRPM2 CRYO-EM SHOWS STRUCTURE OF TRPM2

blog article

Sep 25, 2018

The atomic-level structure of TRPM2 has been revealed for the first time. Researchers at the Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) revealed the structure as a promising drug target for Alzheimer’s and bipolar disorder. The protein, TRPM2 is found...

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New drug Metavert blocks the growth of pancreatic cancer in mice NEW DRUG METAVERT BLOCKS THE GROWTH OF PANCREATIC CANCER IN MICE

blog article

Sep 25, 2018

The study, led by non-profit health science center Cedars-Sinai, also demonstrated in mice that the drug, called Metavert, may prevent patients from developing a resistance to currently used pancreatic cancer chemotherapies. Commenting on the potenti...

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Battling Superbugs: New Compounds Could Make Old Antibiotics New BATTLING SUPERBUGS: NEW COMPOUNDS COULD MAKE OLD ANTIBIOTICS NEW

blog article

Sep 25, 2018

With antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” now infecting 2 million people per year and a dearth of new medications in the pipeline to treat them, CU Boulder researchers are taking a novel approach to address the looming public health crisis: T...

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Lung Inflammation From Childhood Asthma Linked With Later Anxiety LUNG INFLAMMATION FROM CHILDHOOD ASTHMA LINKED WITH LATER ANXIETY

blog article

Sep 25, 2018

Persistent lung inflammation may be one possible explanation for why having asthma during childhood increases your risk of developing anxiety later in life, according to Penn State researchers. In a study with mice, researchers found that childhood e...

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Mitochondrial diseases could be treated with gene therapy MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES COULD BE TREATED WITH GENE THERAPY

blog article

Sep 24, 2018

Researchers have developed a genome-editing tool for the potential treatment of mitochondrial diseases: serious and often fatal conditions which affect 1 in 5,000 people. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, applied an experimental ge...

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Psoriasis and lupus: What PSORIASIS AND LUPUS: WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE?

blog article

Sep 24, 2018

Psoriasis and lupus are both autoimmune conditions that can affect people's skin. Although they share some symptoms, they are separate disorders. It is possible for a person to have both lupus and psoriasis, or psoriatic arthritis. The treatments...

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Throughput: Optimizing patient flow THROUGHPUT: OPTIMIZING PATIENT FLOW

infographic

Sep 22, 2018

As healthcare moves from fee for service to fee for value, health systems need to help their physicians maintain relationships with a broad range of patients. This means getting patients through the door and helping providers work efficiently.

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Medical devices 2030 MEDICAL DEVICES 2030

whitepaper

Sep 21, 2018

While the outlook for medical device companies appears positive, unsustainable health care costs and new competitive forces threaten to alter the future industry landscape. If today’s manufacturers fail to stake their claim in the evolving valu...

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The Future Of Brain Hacking THE FUTURE OF BRAIN HACKING

video

Sep 21, 2018

Advancements in neurotechnology are blurring the line between biology and technology. There is an emerging push to implant electronic devices inside the human body, hardwire them to our brains, and allow us to not only overcome disadvantages or injur...

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Cell Programming Kit CELL PROGRAMMING KIT

video

Sep 21, 2018

Researchers at Caltech have developed a kind of biological toolkit of parts that can be assembled to create custom circuits for cells. Researchers at Caltech have taken an interesting approach to synthetic biology. They’ve engineered a Leg...

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Chemical tags make differences in cell fate and gene expression CHEMICAL TAGS MAKE DIFFERENCES IN CELL FATE AND GENE EXPRESSION

blog article

Sep 21, 2018

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Spain have uncovered the role of chemical ‘tags’ in controlling genes involved in mammalian development. The research was led by Professor Luciano Di Croce and Professor Marc Marti-Renom,...

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Addiction Treatment and Rehabilitation ADDICTION TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION

infographic

Sep 20, 2018

This infographic created by a Non-Profit Addiction Rehab Directory, FindRehabCenters. aims to provide information on addiction treatment and rehabilitation. Addiction is a disease that drug and alcohol rehab can help you overcome. According to the Na...

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Synthetic organelle shows how tiny puddle-organs in our cells work SYNTHETIC ORGANELLE SHOWS HOW TINY PUDDLE-ORGANS IN OUR CELLS WORK

blog article

Sep 20, 2018

An illustration of part of a synthetic organelle without a membrane. Here we see two layers that phase separate like oil and water, but both layers are water. There is no oil. Each layer contains a different solute that gives it its own chemical ther...

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Can a heart treatment lower depression and anxiety? CAN A HEART TREATMENT LOWER DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY?

blog article

Sep 20, 2018

Many people who have atrial fibrillation experience symptoms of mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. Do particular treatments for this condition help resolve such symptoms? A new study suggests they might. Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) ...

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Top 4 Network Security Challenges in Healthcare TOP 4 NETWORK SECURITY CHALLENGES IN HEALTHCARE

whitepaper

Sep 19, 2018

CIO’s and IT professionals in healthcare organizations are tasked with achieving a balance between the demand for universal access to information and the need to ensure security. In particular, four critical challenges these organizations face ...

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Why the anti-vaccination movement is wrong WHY THE ANTI-VACCINATION MOVEMENT IS WRONG

video

Sep 19, 2018

Experts say the impact of the fall in vaccinations for measles, mumps, and rubella is already playing out - 876 cases of measles confirmed in England this year, three times the number for the whole of last year. Here we explore why we have this curio...

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Biomarkers: Embracing a Holistic View Is Key to the Future of Precision Medicine BIOMARKERS: EMBRACING A HOLISTIC VIEW IS KEY TO THE FUTURE OF PRECISION MEDICINE

blog article

Sep 19, 2018

We are entering an era where healthcare as we know it is going to be revolutionized.  We’re beginning to realize the potential that biomarkers hold for the world of medicine. By enabling medical scientists to stratify patients into clear, ...

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Do low vitamin D levels increase breast cancer risk? DO LOW VITAMIN D LEVELS INCREASE BREAST CANCER RISK?

blog article

Sep 19, 2018

A new study from Brazil corroborates the evidence gathered by previous research, suggesting that women with low levels of vitamin D after menopause onset have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) notes t...

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What are the stages of Crohn WHAT ARE THE STAGES OF CROHN'S DISEASE?

blog article

Sep 19, 2018

Crohn's disease is a long-term condition that causes inflammation in the digestive tract. Doctors do not categorize Crohn's into different stages because symptoms can vary considerably over time, which can make it unpredictable. Crohn's d...

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Scientists develop means to manipulate nuclear pore numbers SCIENTISTS DEVELOP MEANS TO MANIPULATE NUCLEAR PORE NUMBERS

blog article

Sep 19, 2018

If you consider the cell nucleus as a bank for DNA, nuclear pores are the security doors around its perimeter. However, more security doors aren’t necessarily desirable, evidenced by the fact that some cancer cells contain a dramatic excess of ...

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Young Children’s Oral Bacteria May Predict Obesity YOUNG CHILDREN’S ORAL BACTERIA MAY PREDICT OBESITY

blog article

Sep 19, 2018

Weight gain trajectories in early childhood are related to the composition of oral bacteria of two-year-old children, suggesting that this understudied aspect of a child’s microbiota the collection of microorganisms, including beneficial bacter...

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Targeting This Key Bacterial Molecule Could Reduce The Need For Antibiotics TARGETING THIS KEY BACTERIAL MOLECULE COULD REDUCE THE NEED FOR ANTIBIOTICS

blog article

Sep 18, 2018

Stanford researchers have shown that bacteria involved in urinary tract infections (UTI) rely on a novel chemical form of the molecule cellulose to stick to bladder cells. The finding, published in the journal of the Proceedings of the National Acade...

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Quick And Easy Test For Viral Infections Reduces Hospital Admissions And Antibiotic Use QUICK AND EASY TEST FOR VIRAL INFECTIONS REDUCES HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS AND ANTIBIOTIC USE

blog article

Sep 17, 2018

A quick and easy test for viral infections can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use and hospital admissions, according to new research presented to the European Respiratory Society International Congress Monday. The test, which takes just 50 minutes to ...

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Paracetamol Use In Infancy Is Linked To Increased Risk Of Asthma In Some Teenagers PARACETAMOL USE IN INFANCY IS LINKED TO INCREASED RISK OF ASTHMA IN SOME TEENAGERS

blog article

Sep 17, 2018

Children who take paracetamol during their first two years of life may be at a higher risk of developing asthma by the age of 18, especially if they have a particular genetic makeup, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Soc...

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Injuries Associated With Infant Walkers Still Sending Children To ER INJURIES ASSOCIATED WITH INFANT WALKERS STILL SENDING CHILDREN TO ER

blog article

Sep 17, 2018

Although infant walkers provide no benefit to children and pose the significant injury risk, many are still being used in US homes. A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital exam...

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Gut Bacteria’s Shocking Secret: They Produce Electricity GUT BACTERIA’S SHOCKING SECRET: THEY PRODUCE ELECTRICITY

blog article

Sep 17, 2018

While bacteria that produce electricity have been found in exotic environments like mines and the bottoms of lakes, scientists have missed a source closer to home: the human gut. UC Berkeley scientists discovered that a common diarrhea-causing bacter...

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Brain cell identified as BRAIN CELL IDENTIFIED AS 'MEDIATOR OF DISEASE'

blog article

Sep 17, 2018

Brain inflammation is a marker of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's, and some psychiatric disorders. A new study finds a subtype of brain cell that is key in neuroinflammation, bringing us closer to new treatments for multiple central nervous syste...

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Disease Diagnosis in Smart Healthcare: Innovation,
Technologies and Applications DISEASE DIAGNOSIS IN SMART HEALTHCARE: INNOVATION, TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS

whitepaper

Sep 16, 2018

To promote sustainable development, the smart city implies a global vision that merges artificial intelligence, big data, decision making, information and communication technology (ICT), and the internet-of-things (IoT). The aging issue is an aspect ...

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Daily low-dose aspirin found to have no effect on healthy life span in older people DAILY LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN FOUND TO HAVE NO EFFECT ON HEALTHY LIFE SPAN IN OLDER PEOPLE

blog article

Sep 16, 2018

ASPREE is an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled 19,114 older people (16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States). The study began in 2010 and enrolled participants aged 70 and older; 65 was the min...

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Study finds benefits of probiotics to be STUDY FINDS BENEFITS OF PROBIOTICS TO BE 'QUESTIONABLE'

video

Sep 16, 2018

TomoNews is your best source for real news. We cover the funniest, craziest and most-talked-about stories on the internet. If you’re laughing, we’re laughing. If you’re outraged, we’re outraged. We tell it like it is. And beca...

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Chronic pain and the power of placebo CHRONIC PAIN AND THE POWER OF PLACEBO

blog article

Sep 16, 2018

A new study has asked whether certain people with chronic pain should be given sugar pills to manage their symptoms. Scientists tap into the individual differences that make some people more susceptible to a placebo. A placebo is a medical interventi...

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Illness or its symptoms treated in a new way ILLNESS OR ITS SYMPTOMS TREATED IN A NEW WAY

infographic

Sep 15, 2018

What does it take to develop a new medicine? To start with, you need a dedicated team of top scientists and other professionals. The journey might take up to fifteen years. Take a look!

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The European Medical Devices Regulations THE EUROPEAN MEDICAL DEVICES REGULATIONS

whitepaper

Sep 15, 2018

The publication of the stable text of the European Union (EU) Medical Devices Regulation (MDR), and the In Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices Regulation (IVDR), in June 2016 documented political agreement between the three EU Institutions – the C...

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What Drugs Do You Need to Survive in Space? WHAT DRUGS DO YOU NEED TO SURVIVE IN SPACE?

video

Sep 15, 2018

When traveling to a faraway place, we are likely to pack some medicines in the bag. For the astronauts on board of the International Space Station (ISS), whose bodies are hurtling at the speed of 7.6 km (5 miles) per second, 408 km (254 miles) above ...

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The Journey of Your Child’s Vaccine THE JOURNEY OF YOUR CHILD’S VACCINE

video

Sep 14, 2018

This video describes the journey of a vaccine from development through post-licensure monitoring.  Learn about the three phases of clinical trials, vaccine licensing and manufacturing, how a vaccine is added to the U.S. Recommended Immunization ...

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Timing could be crucial when taking medication TIMING COULD BE CRUCIAL WHEN TAKING MEDICATION

blog article

Sep 14, 2018

Researchers used bioinformatics tools to analyze thousands of human tissue samples, creating a new database of daily circadian rhythms in human gene activity. The scientists, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre, mention that thei...

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Does a Bigger Brain Make You Smarter? DOES A BIGGER BRAIN MAKE YOU SMARTER?

video

Sep 13, 2018

Bigger is better, right? If you’re trying to insult someone you might call them a “pea brain” or tell them they have a “bird brain,” but as it turns out, brain size does not correlate with intelligence. The human brain, ...

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Developing RNA Medicines for Rare Genetic Diseases DEVELOPING RNA MEDICINES FOR RARE GENETIC DISEASES

blog article

Sep 11, 2018

There are approximately 7,000 known rare diseases, however, less than 6% of these have a treatment. It is estimated that between 25–35 million Americans live with a rare disease. The company ProQR is dedicated to developing new therapeutics for...

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Rapid and affordable antimicrobial resistance profiling of tuberculosis samples RAPID AND AFFORDABLE ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PROFILING OF TUBERCULOSIS SAMPLES

whitepaper

Sep 10, 2018

With over 10 million new cases worldwide each year and approximately 1.7 million deaths, tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading global threats to human health. While disease detection and control methods have yielded a steady decline in the number o...

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6 Ways to Keep Patients Coming Back 6 WAYS TO KEEP PATIENTS COMING BACK

infographic

Sep 10, 2018

We've all heard it. Around one in three patients expect to switch providers in the next few years. This can be really costly to practices. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to keep those patients coming back to your office for years t...

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How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the elbow? HOW DOES RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AFFECT THE ELBOW?

blog article

Sep 10, 2018

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect any of the joints in the body, including the elbow joint. This long-term condition causes inflammation, stiffness, and pain around affected joints. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the elbow can be very uncomfortable, and ...

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New cancer vaccine is 100 percent successful in mouse model NEW CANCER VACCINE IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL IN MOUSE MODEL

blog article

Sep 10, 2018

Scientists have developed a new vaccine that — in conjunction with existing therapies — cannot only treat aggressive melanoma but also prevent its recurrence. Researchers from the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, CA, recently work...

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These supplements may actually harm your health THESE SUPPLEMENTS MAY ACTUALLY HARM YOUR HEALTH

blog article

Sep 09, 2018

New research warns that a number of weight loss and workout supplements contain — without accurately listing — potentially harmful doses of a substance that has been ruled as unsafe. Recently, scientists looked into whether a range of sup...

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A New Pill to Cure Hangovers Is Coming, Here’s How It Works A NEW PILL TO CURE HANGOVERS IS COMING, HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

video

Sep 07, 2018

Inspired by the body’s approach to breaking down alcohol, we chose three natural enzymes that convert alcohol into harmless molecules that are then excreted. That might sound simple because these enzymes were not new, but the tricky part was to...

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Black BLACK 'HAIR' ON TONGUE: HERE'S WHAT CAUSES IT - TOMONEWS

video

Sep 07, 2018

TomoNews is your best source for real news. We cover the funniest, craziest and most-talked-about stories on the internet. If you’re laughing, we’re laughing. If you’re outraged, we’re outraged. We tell it like it is. And beca...

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Single-Dose Drug Shortens Flu Symptoms by ~1 Day SINGLE-DOSE DRUG SHORTENS FLU SYMPTOMS BY ~1 DAY

blog article

Sep 07, 2018

A single dose of a new influenza drug can significantly shorten the duration of the illness in teens and adults, according to a study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. The article reports the results of two multicenter, do...

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Building a Better Brain-in-a-Dish, Faster and Cheaper BUILDING A BETTER BRAIN-IN-A-DISH, FASTER AND CHEAPER

blog article

Sep 07, 2018

The development of a rapid, cost-effective method to create human cortical organoids directly from primary cells has been described by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in a paper published in Stem Cells and De...

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Novel Cancer Vaccine Against Melanoma Tested NOVEL CANCER VACCINE AGAINST MELANOMA TESTED

blog article

Sep 07, 2018

An experimental cancer vaccine that boosts the immune system’s ability to fight cancers could work in tandem with other cancer therapies to fight aggressive tumors, scientists reported recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scie...

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Enabling Data Integrity from Drug Discovery through Manufacturing ENABLING DATA INTEGRITY FROM DRUG DISCOVERY THROUGH MANUFACTURING

whitepaper

Sep 06, 2018

When discussing the success of a drug therapy, a common topic amongst biopharmaceutical companies is data quality and data integrity; what the challenges are and what the key elements are to ensuring that the latest discovery is patentable, does not ...

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How uncontrolled inflammation leads to brain cell loss HOW UNCONTROLLED INFLAMMATION LEADS TO BRAIN CELL LOSS

blog article

Sep 06, 2018

In a study of inflammation mechanisms in the brain, researchers from the University of Bonn in Germany have identified how, as we get older, a vicious cycle of poorly regulated inflammatory responses leads to the loss of brain cells. Recently, t...

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The alchemy of healing: Researchers turn open wounds into the skin THE ALCHEMY OF HEALING: RESEARCHERS TURN OPEN WOUNDS INTO THE SKIN

blog article

Sep 05, 2018

Plastic surgery to treat large cutaneous ulcers, including those seen in people with severe burns, bedsores or chronic diseases such as diabetes, may someday be a thing of the past. Scientists at the Salk Institute have developed a technique to direc...

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DNA of early medieval Alemannic warriors and their entourage decoded DNA OF EARLY MEDIEVAL ALEMANNIC WARRIORS AND THEIR ENTOURAGE DECODED

blog article

Sep 05, 2018

In 1962, an Alemannic burial site containing human skeletal remains was discovered in Niederstotzingen (Baden-Württemberg, Germany). Researchers at the Eurac Research Centre in Bozen-Bolzano, Italy, and at the Max Planck Institute for the Scienc...

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Applications of high content screening in autophagy APPLICATIONS OF HIGH CONTENT SCREENING IN AUTOPHAGY

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

Autophagy is an important process to maintain cellular homeostasis and function. Basal levels of autophagy are essential for most cells to remove unwanted protein aggregates and damaged organelles in order to prevent diseases. However, sometimes cell...

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Complex biology for the precision medicine era: re-thinking the drug discovery process COMPLEX BIOLOGY FOR THE PRECISION MEDICINE ERA: RE-THINKING THE DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

Complex biology is a discipline acknowledging that performing biological experiments in vitro should take account of the complexity of the biological context. While this may be a noble aim, it has proven difficult to incorporate these elements into t...

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New clues found to understanding relapse in breast cancer NEW CLUES FOUND TO UNDERSTANDING RELAPSE IN BREAST CANCER

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

A large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of...

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Computational analysis identifies a new clinical phenotype of severe malaria COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES A NEW CLINICAL PHENOTYPE OF SEVERE MALARIA

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

There are more clinical phenotypes of severe malaria than those defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by “la Caixa” Foundation. The results indicate that heart failu...

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A step closer to preventing autoimmune response to gene therapy A STEP CLOSER TO PREVENTING AUTOIMMUNE RESPONSE TO GENE THERAPY

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

Stanford University School of Medicine researchers used a mouse model in an effort to counter the body’s autoimmune reaction to the normal protein that it’s encountering for the first time. The model they used accurately recapitulates Duc...

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10-Year Risk Estimates For Dementia May Help Early Targeted Prevention 10-YEAR RISK ESTIMATES FOR DEMENTIA MAY HELP EARLY TARGETED PREVENTION

blog article

Sep 04, 2018

A Danish study provides 10-year absolute risk estimates for dementia specific to age, sex and common variation in the APOE gene, which may help identify high-risk individuals who potentially could benefit from early targeted prevention. The study is ...

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Is it time to dismiss the myths and fears about psoriasis? IS IT TIME TO DISMISS THE MYTHS AND FEARS ABOUT PSORIASIS?

blog article

Sep 03, 2018

Psoriasis is a long-lasting noncontagious skin condition that can cause much discomfort. Because of its unpleasing appearance, psoriasis is often accompanied by stigma. A new study reveals that myths surrounding the skin condition still persist in th...

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Deadly venoms may drive medical advances DEADLY VENOMS MAY DRIVE MEDICAL ADVANCES

blog article

Sep 02, 2018

Despite the fast pace of research, there are still many diseases that defy treatment. A paper, recently published in the journal Science, asks whether venom might help design innovative treatments. Venomous plants and animals are incredibly common 15...

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Cardiovascular disease: Study finds the best drugs for prevention CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: STUDY FINDS THE BEST DRUGS FOR PREVENTION

blog article

Sep 01, 2018

A large cohort study has identified which treatment combinations work best for people with high blood pressure who are at risk for heart disease. Taking both blood pressure drugs and statins might be the best choice, the researchers find. Researchers...

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A Brand New Type of Brain Cell A BRAND NEW TYPE OF BRAIN CELL

video

Aug 31, 2018

Two teams of scientists in two different parts of the world discovered a previously unknown neuron, which might have a lot to do with what makes humans, human.

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West Nile virus kills 17 in Greece WEST NILE VIRUS KILLS 17 IN GREECE

video

Aug 31, 2018

West Nile virus can cause severe neurological symptoms and can even result in death. It’s common in horses and birds are natural hosts, but don’t become infected. For horses, there is a vaccine available, but no vaccine to prevent the dis...

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Matcha green tea kills cancer stem cells MATCHA GREEN TEA KILLS CANCER STEM CELLS

blog article

Aug 31, 2018

Scientists from the University of Salford used breast cancer stem cells to test Matcha green tea. Matcha is a stone-ground powder made from green tea leaves and has often been hailed as a ‘miracle food’ containing properties to treat and ...

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Scientists decode opium poppy genome SCIENTISTS DECODE OPIUM POPPY GENOME

blog article

Aug 30, 2018

Scientists have determined the DNA code of the opium poppy genome, uncovering key steps in how the plant evolved to produce the pharmaceutical compounds used to make vital medicines. The discovery may pave the way for scientists to improve yields and...

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Potential drug to cure ciliopathies POTENTIAL DRUG TO CURE CILIOPATHIES

blog article

Aug 30, 2018

Ciliopathies are rare disorders involving functional and structural abnormalities of cilia. Although they are rare, they may reach 1 in 1,000 births. Unfortunately, there are no small-molecule drugs for treating ciliary defects. A KAIST research team...

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Scientists discover compound for a non-addictive painkiller SCIENTISTS DISCOVER COMPOUND FOR A NON-ADDICTIVE PAINKILLER

blog article

Aug 30, 2018

Scientists have developed a chemical compound which could potentially lead to becoming an effective non-addictive painkiller. Researchers from the Wake Forest School of Medicine, along with support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse developed ...

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Electronic Device Planted in Brain Could Stop Seizures ELECTRONIC DEVICE PLANTED IN BRAIN COULD STOP SEIZURES

blog article

Aug 30, 2018

Researchers have successfully demonstrated how an electronic device implanted directly into the brain can detect, stop and even prevent epileptic seizures. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, the École Nationale Supérieur...

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Tapping Into Diagnostics to Harness the Microbiome TAPPING INTO DIAGNOSTICS TO HARNESS THE MICROBIOME

infographic

Aug 29, 2018

It is becoming clear that the microbes which reside in and on us play a significant role in maintaining health and disease. It will be fascinating to see how knowledge of this complex world can be used to aid medical decision-making in the future.

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Novel imaging biomarker to help predict coronary inflammation NOVEL IMAGING BIOMARKER TO HELP PREDICT CORONARY INFLAMMATION

blog article

Aug 29, 2018

Researchers have identified a novel imaging biomarker, which has been found to be able to predict all-cause and cardiac mortality by measuring inflammation of fatty tissue surrounding the coronary arteries. Coronary artery inflammation inhibits fatty...

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Scientists develop TSA-Seq technique for precise 3D mapping of the human genome SCIENTISTS DEVELOP TSA-SEQ TECHNIQUE FOR PRECISE 3D MAPPING OF THE HUMAN GENOME

blog article

Aug 29, 2018

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have reported a new technique that can measure the position of every single gene in the nucleus to build a 3D picture of the genome’s layout, called tyramide signal amplification s...

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Understanding Type 2 Diabetes UNDERSTANDING TYPE 2 DIABETES

video

Aug 28, 2018

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar level is too high. The causes of type 2 diabetes and why it is important to keep it under control, are explained.

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Brain-heart link points at potential biomarker for trauma-induced epilepsy BRAIN-HEART LINK POINTS AT POTENTIAL BIOMARKER FOR TRAUMA-INDUCED EPILEPSY

blog article

Aug 28, 2018

Concentrating on subjects who suffered physical or infectious brain insults, Penn State researchers studied mouse models of cerebral malaria, which often causes epilepsy in those who survive. Results of their study indicate a possible biomarker that ...

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Scientists show combined immunotherapy treatment effective against advanced melanoma SCIENTISTS SHOW COMBINED IMMUNOTHERAPY TREATMENT EFFECTIVE AGAINST ADVANCED MELANOMA

blog article

Aug 28, 2018

The UCLA-led research showed that using the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab and the experimental agent SD-101 a sequence of nucleic acids that mimics a bacterial infection altered the microenvironment surrounding the tumor in a way that enabled the ...

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Researchers Reveal Cause Of Aggressive Skin Cancer In Patients With Butterfly Syndrome RESEARCHERS REVEAL CAUSE OF AGGRESSIVE SKIN CANCER IN PATIENTS WITH BUTTERFLY SYNDROME

blog article

Aug 28, 2018

Patients with a rare skin disease, commonly called Butterfly Syndrome, that causes chronic blistering and extensive scarring also develop an aggressive and fatal form of cancer early in life. Now an international team of scientists led by researchers...

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FHIR FINALLY BRINGS THE INTERNET TO BEAR ON HEALTHCARE’S BIG DATA FHIR FINALLY BRINGS THE INTERNET TO BEAR ON HEALTHCARE’S BIG DATA

whitepaper

Aug 27, 2018

Pervading every facet of daily life, the information superhighway that society has come to know and love – and occasionally loathe – has enabled a level of communication, collaboration, insight, and analysis that has rendered the current ...

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Scientists identify a new kind of human brain cell SCIENTISTS IDENTIFY A NEW KIND OF HUMAN BRAIN CELL

blog article

Aug 27, 2018

One of the most intriguing questions about the human brain is also one of the most difficult for neuroscientists to answer: What sets our brains apart from those of other animals? "We really don't understand what makes the human brain specia...

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Jury Still Out On Aspirin A Day To Prevent Heart Attack And Stroke JURY STILL OUT ON ASPIRIN A DAY TO PREVENT HEART ATTACK AND STROKE

blog article

Aug 26, 2018

The jury is still out on whether people at moderate risk of a first heart attack or stroke should take the daily aspirin to lower their risk, according to late-breaking results from the ARRIVE study1 presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congr...

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Why Polluted Air May Be A Threat To Your Kidneys WHY POLLUTED AIR MAY BE A THREAT TO YOUR KIDNEYS

blog article

Aug 26, 2018

There is good evidence that polluted air increases the risk of respiratory problems such as asthma as well as organ inflammation, worsening of diabetes and other life-threatening conditions. But new research suggests air pollution can also fuel somet...

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Scientists Have Developed An Effective Marker For Cancer Diagnosis And Therapy SCIENTISTS HAVE DEVELOPED AN EFFECTIVE MARKER FOR CANCER DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY

blog article

Aug 26, 2018

A research group consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS, the Technical University of Munich, Helmholtz Zentrum München, the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the University of Oldenburg has developed a system that allows doctors to both improv...

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HPLC vs UHPLC HPLC VS UHPLC

whitepaper

Aug 24, 2018

Liquid chromatography is a technique of key importance for many areas of chemical analysis and one that has evolved with the progression of technology and instrumentation over time. Here we highlight some of the key similarities and differences betwe...

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CTE: Why this brain disease is more common than you think CTE: WHY THIS BRAIN DISEASE IS MORE COMMON THAN YOU THINK

video

Aug 24, 2018

We explain Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE, a neurodegenerative brain disease found in people who have experienced repetitive hits to the head. It can affect anyone, As kids head back to school, you may want to rethink whether your child should...

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NanoMIPs efficiently target and eliminate cancer cells NANOMIPS EFFICIENTLY TARGET AND ELIMINATE CANCER CELLS

blog article

Aug 24, 2018

A joint research team from Russia and the UK has demonstrated the possibility of developing a new type of anti-neoplastic drugs based on nanoMIPs, or “plastic antibodies.” NanoMIPs are synthetic polymers that can function as antibodies, s...

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Alzheimer’s One Day May Be Predicted During Eye Exam ALZHEIMER’S ONE DAY MAY BE PREDICTED DURING EYE EXAM

blog article

Aug 24, 2018

It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using an eye exam. Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors’ offices, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis ha...

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Coconut oil has "undeserved health halo," dietitian says COCONUT OIL HAS "UNDESERVED HEALTH HALO," DIETITIAN SAYS

video

Aug 23, 2018

A controversial lecture on nutrition calls into question the health claims for coconut oil. A Harvard adjunct professor called the oil "pure poison." Coconut oil's superfood status was challenged last year when the American Heart Associ...

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Handheld probe images photoreceptors in children HANDHELD PROBE IMAGES PHOTORECEPTORS IN CHILDREN

blog article

Aug 23, 2018

The technology, based on adaptive optics, will make it easier for physicians and scientists to observe these cells to diagnose eye diseases and make early detection of brain-related diseases and trauma. Photoreceptors are specialized neurons that com...

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AI system detects cancer tumours missed by conventional diagnostics AI SYSTEM DETECTS CANCER TUMOURS MISSED BY CONVENTIONAL DIAGNOSTICS

blog article

Aug 23, 2018

Computer engineers have ‘taught’ a computer to identify tiny specs of lung cancer in CT scan images, often missed by radiologists. Engineers have used machine learning to ‘teach’ a computer how to detect tiny specs of lung can...

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What are gastric and duodenal ulcers? WHAT ARE GASTRIC AND DUODENAL ULCERS?

blog article

Aug 23, 2018

Gastric and duodenal ulcers are types of peptic ulcer. The main distinction is that they affect different parts of the digestive tract. A person could have both at the same time. Some causes of peptic ulcers include an excess of stomach acid, bacteri...

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Contact Centers in Healthcare: A Report for Hospital Leaders CONTACT CENTERS IN HEALTHCARE: A REPORT FOR HOSPITAL LEADERS

whitepaper

Aug 22, 2018

Fifty-one percent of national survey respondents say they’ve had a contact center strategy in place 3 – 5 years, and 48 percent call their strategy an enterprise transformation initiative. Can maximizing this resource take your hospital i...

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Modified-RNA vaccine elicits protective response against influenza MODIFIED-RNA VACCINE ELICITS PROTECTIVE RESPONSE AGAINST INFLUENZA

blog article

Aug 22, 2018

A universal flu vaccine that protects people against most influenza strains is one step closer to reality, with a study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The candidate vaccine elicited a strong antibody response ...

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Blood test may identify cancer patients who won’t respond to immunotherapy BLOOD TEST MAY IDENTIFY CANCER PATIENTS WHO WON’T RESPOND TO IMMUNOTHERAPY

blog article

Aug 22, 2018

Patients who are unlikely to benefit from a commonly used immunotherapy for bladder cancer could be identified by a simple blood test, according to researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). This could potentially save months of unnece...

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Can You Take Expired Drugs? CAN YOU TAKE EXPIRED DRUGS?

video

Aug 21, 2018

Description: Every medicine you buy has an expiration date printed on it somewhere, but does it actually go bad? This week on Reactions, we explain the chemistry of drug expiration dates.

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Making a microscopic swarm move through a maze MAKING A MICROSCOPIC SWARM MOVE THROUGH A MAZE

video

Aug 21, 2018

A microscopic swarm, just a few millimeters in length, can move through a maze with a just few clicks of a mouse. The swarm is formed from millions of magnetic nanoparticles suspended in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field. Researchers in China have...

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EpiPen (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injector 0.3 mg August 2018 Update EPIPEN (EPINEPHRINE INJECTION, USP) AUTO-INJECTOR 0.3 MG AUGUST 2018 UPDATE

video

Aug 21, 2018

Currently, the supply of EpiPen (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injector 0.3 mg and the authorized generic version in the United States varies from pharmacy to pharmacy. Our Dr. Freda Lewis-Hall comments on the situation. For more information about...

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Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer | Prostate Cancer Staging Guide ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE FOR PROSTATE CANCER | PROSTATE CANCER STAGING GUIDE

video

Aug 21, 2018

PCRI’s Executive Director, Mark Scholz, MD, gives an overview of active surveillance, a monitoring strategy for men with low-grade prostate cancer. He talks about why it is done, who is eligible and how it is performed.

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Research team develops predictor for immunotherapy response in melanoma RESEARCH TEAM DEVELOPS PREDICTOR FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY RESPONSE IN MELANOMA

blog article

Aug 21, 2018

In a new study, researchers developed a gene expression predictor that can indicate whether melanoma in a specific patient is likely to respond to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, a novel type of immunotherapy. The predictor was developed...

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The Agricultural Perspective on Water Contamination by Pharmaceuticals THE AGRICULTURAL PERSPECTIVE ON WATER CONTAMINATION BY PHARMACEUTICALS

blog article

Aug 21, 2018

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has recognized pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) [1] to be part of a class of materials known as “emerging contaminants”. Emerging contaminants [2] can be either manmade o...

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Can gut bacteria help us achieve a CAN GUT BACTERIA HELP US ACHIEVE A 'UNIVERSAL' BLOOD TYPE?

blog article

Aug 21, 2018

In light of the global relief efforts required after natural disasters, which have often called for blood transfusions, researchers are looking for effective ways of turning other blood types into the "universal. Researchers press on with their ...

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Vitamin B-3 may treat and prevent acute kidney injury VITAMIN B-3 MAY TREAT AND PREVENT ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

blog article

Aug 21, 2018

New research suggests that taking vitamin B-3 orally might soon become an effective way to treat or even prevent acute kidney injury. In acute kidney injury, the kidneys suddenly stop functioning usually as a result of complications during hospitaliz...

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How much protein is too much? HOW MUCH PROTEIN IS TOO MUCH?

blog article

Aug 20, 2018

Proteins are the most versatile molecules for the human body and are key to almost all biological processes. The average recommended dietary allowance for protein is calculated using the ratio of 1 gram of protein for every 1 kilogram of a person'...

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Maple Leaf Extract Could Nip Skin Wrinkles In The Bud MAPLE LEAF EXTRACT COULD NIP SKIN WRINKLES IN THE BUD

blog article

Aug 20, 2018

Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep and that’s a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles...

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Largest Oral HPV Study In England Shows Infection Rates Lower Than Expected LARGEST ORAL HPV STUDY IN ENGLAND SHOWS INFECTION RATES LOWER THAN EXPECTED

blog article

Aug 20, 2018

Infection rates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) oral infection in England are lower than expected, compared to previous US studies. The research, conducted by the University of Sheffield, also strengthens the evidence that smoking and sexu...

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4 Top Trends in Healthcare Data Analysis to Adopt Today 4 TOP TRENDS IN HEALTHCARE DATA ANALYSIS TO ADOPT TODAY

whitepaper

Aug 18, 2018

The healthcare industry has never been more focused on data its promise and its pitfalls as it is today. From slashing health care spending to detecting fraud or coordinating care across multiple providers improved the use of healthcare data has been...

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To Find And Disarm: Scientists Develop Platform To Kill Cancer Cells TO FIND AND DISARM: SCIENTISTS DEVELOP PLATFORM TO KILL CANCER CELLS

blog article

Aug 17, 2018

The new treatment will serve as both the diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. This breakthrough in the technologies of cancer diagnosis and treatment was made by an interdisciplinary Russian-German collaboration of chemists, physicists, and b...

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Developing Neuroprotective Therapies: Defending the Nervous System from Damage DEVELOPING NEUROPROTECTIVE THERAPIES: DEFENDING THE NERVOUS SYSTEM FROM DAMAGE

blog article

Aug 17, 2018

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Accelerator Life Science Partners recently announced the launch of Magnolia Neurosciences Corporation – a biopharmaceutical company advancing a new class of neuroprotective medicines. To lea...

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Cancer by stage: Breast and prostate CANCER BY STAGE: BREAST AND PROSTATE

infographic

Aug 16, 2018

Doctors often use survival rates as a standard way of discussing a person's outlook (prognosis). These numbers can’t tell you how long you will live, but they might help you better understand your prognosis. Some people want to know the sur...

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Is it safe to mix aspirin and ibuprofen? IS IT SAFE TO MIX ASPIRIN AND IBUPROFEN?

blog article

Aug 16, 2018

Taking aspirin and ibuprofen at the same time can cause side effects. The safety of mixing these drugs depends on the reasons why people are taking them. Aspirin and ibuprofen are both pain relievers from the same family of medicines known as non-ste...